Gurney Seed and Nursery Company

Historic, archived Do not assume content scientific knowledge, document reflects current policies, or practices. » GURNEY'S MODEL GLOBE BEET N...

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Historic, archived

Do not assume content scientific

knowledge,

document reflects current

policies, or practices.

»

GURNEY'S MODEL GLOBE BEET No other beet equal to this for uniform size, shape, color, earliness and quality. Foliage, dark red. Very ornamental. Pkt. 10c; oz. 15c; V* lb. 40c; Mt lb. 70c; 1 lb. $1.00. Postpaid.

RNEY'S DAKOTA RED GLOBE ONION The most profitable, highest yielding, best shaped red onion. The kind that pays a dividend. Pkt. 10c; oz. 35c; % lb. $1.00; */2 lb. $1.50; lib. $2.50; 5 tbs. $10.00. Postpaid;

Mi H

GURNEY'S BUGLESS POTATO The highest yielding, best quality, best keeping drouth-resistant and more immune 1 lb. 35c; 5 lbs. postpaid, $1.30; 15 lbs. Vos. $10.00; 600 lbs. $19.00. ,

from bugs than any other potato grown. $1.40; 30 lbs. $1. 75; 60 lbs. $2.50; 300 •

.......

-

:.

Established in Jones County, Iowa, in 1866.

Great Northwest

The House

59 years in the

—1925

of

Gurney

Dear Friends and Customers: Again, I come to you with the annual catalog of the House of Gurney. This is the fifty-ninth and each of the fifty-nine have been written by a “Gurney,” as the business has been continuously in the family. It means that everyone of the Gurneys now connected with the Company were born in and their We have worked strenuously all of these years to create and life’s work has been with this Company. distribute the highest quality goods and those best adapted to your locality, no matter where you may live.

you an idea of the scope of our business, we have received today, November 14th, 1924, orders and trees from every State in the Union but two, and from five foreign countries, and you must understand November is probably the lightest month in the year for seeds and nursery sales. Business results of this kind could only be obtained by giving the customer service and quality goods that would not only secure his own order, but would leave each customer so well pleased that he would urge others to buy from us.

To

give

for seeds

The business and facilities have grown from the first twelve by fourteen foot nursery packing house The catalog edition has increased from an original few hundred to to the present four acre floor space. this edition of more than nine car loads. They have spread from the original local trade, covering possibly •a County in Eastern Iowa to the entire United States, as well as most foreign countries. I

am

today to increase the number of customers as I have ever been and each year hopi the next will, liberal increase in the number of customers and, the total dollars of

just as anxious

has shown and

I

business.

We

are equipped to give you Gurney service on every order that comes to us. This service means a close inspection of the orders sent to us, to determine whether or not you have ordered that which is best adapted to your locality. If you have not, we advise changes, subject of course to your approval.

On all orders for seeds and Seasonable goods that would not be damaged by weather conditions, immediate shipment is made, often closing our business day in a rush Season, with less than twenty-four hours Perishable goods, such as nursery stock, potatoes and greenhouse goods of orders on hand, unshipped. are of necessity held until weather conditions are such that safe shipment can be made, and the ground will be in such condition on their arrival that you may be able to give them the same care that we do. Our service to you does not stop with the receiving and shipping of the order, but we are working in your interest years in advance, originating, producing, experimenting with and eventually distributing to you, proven new varieties that are equal to or better than old ones. I have in mind now many things that may not be offered to you in ten years, because it takes time to prove them. Many that I have in mind and on which we have spent much money and time will never be offered, as they will prove unworthy, in some way.

We

The greater part of our work has been in this immense Central West. have assisted, materially, in originating and distributing varieties of corn, that has made it profitable to grow corn to the extreme North line of the United States. have originated and distributed varieties of fruits that has made it possible to grow all of the fruit a person can use on any piece of ground where there is sufficient moisture to keep it alive and sufficient soil in which to plant and sustain it, and I want to refer you to the many testimonials printed in the catalog, bearing me out in this.

We

Our service does not stop with this originating and distributing, but is carried further in our knowledge and action in the proper packing and shipping, so that the goods will absolutely reach you in the best condition and at the proper time. We have shipped nursery stock to China and other foreign countries and been complimented on the excellent condition of their arrival, due to our careful system of packing.

Our service does not end here, but we write, print and distribute free, more than fifty different bulletins on various Horticultural and Agricultural subjects that you may have the knowledge that we have gained in our half century’s experience to assist you in proper care of the various purchases. The edition of these bulletins run into the millions and you are absolutely welcome to them, whether or not you buy from us. It

is

a part of the Gurney service.

We receive

and answer every day of the year, a great many letters asking for special information, not These are all handled by experts, without cost to yourselves. We are pleased to

given in the bulletins. give

you

this service.

To demonstrate the above

to your own satisfaction, favor us with an inquiry for bulletins or special information, or better yet, send us your order and we will demonstrate to you the value of this service.

thank the immense number of new customers that were added to our list in the want to say now that it was the largest number ever added in one year. We could only by service which means quality goods, as well as the other service that goes with them and it must

I wish, especially, to

year of 1924.

I

do this have been extended over I

thank

all

many

years.

of you.

D.

B GURNEY,

President,

1866— HOUSE OF GURNEY,

2

YANKTON,

S.

D.— 1925

READ CAREFULLY—BUSINESS RULES, INSTRUCTIONS AND GUARANTEE Any business to be successful must have “Rules,” and live up to them. goods after arrival at prepaid stations where there are no No. 1 Never allow any seed to leave our possession until If goods are received at your station or through the agents. it has been tested, and shows a germinating test that would postoffice in bad order, accept them, but in every case, if satisfy us for our own planting.



— —

No. 2 Use every means in our power to know that all Seed and Nursery Stock sent out by us are true to name. No. 3 Never give customers less than they pay for; always give them full amount of the very best goods and then put in

some No. 4

extra.

—We

guarantee safe arrival at your post office or railroad station of any goods purchased from us, provided you send us notice of their failure to arrive within three months from date of shipment. We do not guarantee against loss of

through the postoffice have- a statement made by the postmaster or the carrier of the condition of the package when you receive it; if through the railway or express company, a notation on the freight or express receipt of its exact condition,

noting torn sacks, shortage in weight, or any other damage that may be made to the shipment. Return this to us and we will immediately reimburse you and make our claim against the transportation company. This protects you. No. 5 Never open a book account with any person; cash before shipment.



TRANSPORTATION READ CAREFULLY —

No. 6 At the prices quoted we deliver goods to any Express or Railway Company or postoffice in the city of Yankton, no charge for bags or boxes. All seeds quoted in packages, ounces, one-fourth, one-half or one pound, and all strawberries, will be sent by parcel post or express, all charges paid to your postoffice or railroad station. Transportation charges on all other seeds and nursery stock, machinery, or other goods handled by us are to be paid by the purchaser. No. 7 Follow shipping instructions given by the customer; if none are given, use our best judgment, always securing the lowest possible rate for them. No. 8—When we receive an order for goods without any signature, or one that we cannot read, we use every effort to To avoid this extra trouble and delay in locate the party. tilling orders, please sign your name to your orders; give the P. O. address, Rural Route, County, State and name of railroad. Make them plain so that anyone can read them. No. 9 We guarantee safe arrival of all money paid us by





draft, personal check, express or postoffice money order. accept currency and coin in any amount, but advise against sending it as it is easily lost in the mail. We do not guarantee its safe arrival. We accept postage stamps in payment

bank

We

of goods, and request when you send them, that you make them in 5c and up denominations. We, however, do not guarantee their safe arrival. Y our personal check is the most convenient method for you to use. It is often inconvenient to send to town for draft or money order, and if you have money in the bank to cover your check it is good with us. We make you this offer to save you delay and trouble in obtaining the goods you need. No. 10 If we do not have every item ordered, we do not ,



without your permission. All money sent for goods that we are unable to fill is returned promptly. No. 11 We send out nothing but goods of the best grade. If you want a cheaper, poorer grade, you will have to purchase substitute,



elsewhere.

No. 12 notice.

— Prices of

all

goods subject to change without #

This is a very important paragraph, as in these times of changing prices it is very difficult to determine what prices may be in February, March or April at the time of writing this catalog in November. We use our best judgment and any information we can secure. Remember, we are just as willing to lower as to raise the prices if the market will warrant.

PARCEL POST No. 13—We can deliver to your door packages weighing up to and including 70 lbs., in the first, second and third zones,

50 lbs. outside of those three zones. We can deliver these packages to you at a very low rate, lower than express rate This will undoubtedly mean a readjustment in most cases. of express rates to a lower basis.



No. 14 Orders packed in rotation as received. Notice mailed on day of receipt of order if order cannot be packed that day. All perishable goods ordered will be shipped just as early in the spring as the weather will permit. They will

reach you in time. No. 15 We guarantee that



all .seed ordered from this catalog will prove of satisfactory germinating test to you; that is, on arrival of the seed test it, and if it does not prove satisfactory you may return it to us within fifteen days after receipt of the seed by you, returning at our expense, and your money, together with the transportation charges which you

We

Live

Up

to All of the

have paid, will be refunded. It is so manifestly impossible for a seller of any perishable article to be responsible for what may happen to it after it leaves his hands, especially one like seeds, which are planted under varying conditions of soil and climate, that we and all other American seed houses disclaim responsibility as to the crop that may be raised from seed which we sell. At the same time, in case of failure to secure proper results caused from some inherent fault in the seeds

Gurney Seed and Nursery Company accept responnot for the crop, but to the extent of the amount of for the seed if immediately advised; or, seeds may be returned. We do not warrant in any way, express or implied, the contents or the description, quality, productiveness, or any other matter of any seed and we will not be in any way responsible for the crop. If the purchaser does not accept the goods on these terms they are at once to be returned, and your money and transportation charges paid by you will be cheerfully refunded. themselves, sibility,

money paid

Above— GURNEY SEED & NURSERY CO Roses on the Front Cover We are proud of the We have thousands of

Roses we send to our customers. customers who know the quality Thorup does and acknowledges

of our Roses, just as Mrs. in her fine letter below.

The Rose garden on the front page can be a reality av your own home. Eleven of all of the various colors of the Rose family, the hardiest varieties, all heavy two-year field grown plants, not the kind that are torn out of greenhouse benches, after they have been forced to death, but the kind that has been grown especially to produce beautiful flowers for you; the kind that bloom continuously during the summer and at the extremely low price of 60c each; five, your choice for $2.60 or the whole set of eleven for $5.00.

Mrs. Anna W. Thorup, Wright County, la. Apr. 11, 1924. I want to thank, you and congratulate you on the fine, large roses you send out to your customers. They are so much larger and stronger than from other Companies, and the packing seems to be perfect. These conditions are very satisfying to your customers.

MSE-SIHtim

Jr., McCook County, Mammoth Pumpkins from

Fred W. Lander,

A

couple of

They took

first

These are

my

prize at McCook two boys.

County

S. D,

your seed. Fair.

An Order for one Package of Seed will receive just as Careful Attention as though it was for $100

& Nursery Co.

Gurney Seed

Yankton, South Dakota Date

Gentlemen:

1925

Please send

me

the following goods by

Name Post Office

R. F. D. No.

Shipping Point (Name

Name

of R. R.

Town)

of R. R.

i

-

County Is I

Sheet,

State

there an agent at your R, R, Station?

Bu.

Amount

Miles from R. R. Station.

live.

Lbs,

Oz,

Pkt,

Name

No,

Enclosed

of Goods Ordered

Size

This

on

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Use



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Will you kindly add

names

’.1

of three friends for our catalog.

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To insure prompt answer

write letters on separate sheet.

J

1866— HOUSE OF GURNEY, The Folks

Who

Are Responsible

for

YANKTON,

D

S.

.

—-1925

Your Orders and Something About Them

H.J.GURNEY

CHARLES GURNEY,

'ky\\ COL CW GURNEY MOTHER GTJKNET? fl

,

N

dealing with anyone that you cannot meet personally, seeing their picture and knowing a little about the connection they have in handling your business is more satisfactory. I cannot say very much about any one of them on account A few years ago we showed of lack of space. you a picture of Col. C. W. Gurney and the seven sons. In 1913 Col. Gurney passed The seven sons are to the great beyond. actively connected and have added still the grandsons, Chandler and Charles, sons of D. B.

I

G.W. GURNEY

JDOo



H. J. Is again located in California, taking care of our West Coast business, which has been growing very rapidly and promises to equal that of any other portion of the United

gation at the nursery during the summer months and Superintendent of nursery packing the balance of the season.

States.

Donald Is Superintendent .of the vegetable and flower seed department. Every order that comes to us for these items passes through his hands, and when I tell you that during the busy season we send a good many truck loads of parcel post packages to the postoffice every day containing thousands of packages to the load, you will realize that he has to keep busy

D. B.

and general —President the whole bunch

Responsible for thing of a job sometimes.

A

manager

of

the business.

Somein a business way. mighty good bunch, however,

and we work well together.



P. S. General overseer of the downtown plant. When you consider that our downtown plant consists of about ten large buildings and large grounds, and houses all the departments, you will know that his job is a strenuous one. ,



S. S. Is nursery superintendent. S. S. produces the nursery stock receive'd by. you, and there are hundreds of it, and increasing each year. It requires the best S._ S. possible, knowledge to grow these trees and plants right. has lived on some portion of the nursery practically all his life. acres of

-

_



Geo. W. Is absolute “Monarch of all he surveys” in the nursery department in the office. He has charge of everything in connection with the nursery departmentfromthe office end, and thousands of letters are received by him each day during the busy part of. the season. ,



C. A; His title should be “General Assistant to Everybody.” But he is actually Assistant Superintendent of propa-





Son of D. B. Born in 1895. The first year was J. Cu devoted to the “nursery’’ department. From that time to the present he has been in and through most of the departments and has a rattling good working knowledge in any part

He is secretary-treasurer of the company. During the World War, he spent nearly a year in France, and just after the armistice took a look into the “Great Beof the business.

yond.” place,

J.

and

Charles

C.

is

married, has three peaches of kids out at his me in the grandfather class four times.

this puts

— Son

21 years old,

Married in Oct., 1921. Almost of D. B. “some rustler” that. boy. Mighty fine wife.

Spent his last several summers calling on our merchant customers in a great many of the western states. The new baby is growing up rapidly nearly two years old now, talks nearly as fast and as much as its mother. D. B. GURNEY, Pres.

1866

— HOUSE

OF GURNEY, YANKTON,

S.

D.— 1925

GARDEN SEED FOR

1925

Something Good Packed Free with Each Order

SPECIAL CASH PREMIUMS FOR

1925

Mammoth Pumpkin —Every order that goes from the garden and flower seed department contains a package of these Mammoth Pumpkin seed, producing pumpkins weighing as much as 200 lbs. We pay for the largest pumpkin reported $10=00 in cash. Gurney's Bugless Potatoes— The largest yielding, best quality, most immune from bugs any potato. For the largest potato grown from our seed $10,00 in cash. Table Queen Squash The highest yielding and best quality individual squash. For the greatest number of squash produced on one vine we pay $10.00 in cash. Gurney's Rainbow Flint For the longest ear of this remarkable flint corn we pav $10.00 of





IN CASH.

Ground Almond very interesting novelty as one nut will produce as many as 125 to 150 in a hill. They should be sown in good mellow ground, they have a very fine almond flavor. The nuts are about three-quarters of an inch in length, having a thin brown skin and snow white meat that becomes- sweeter after the- nuts ha;ve been harvested and dried for a time. Our seed of these nuts is graded and will make an excellent crop. The nuts are formed near the surface and Price, pkt., 10c; y4 lb., 25c; lb., 75c, postpaid. will mature in the fall after the first frost. Is a

Asparagus Sow in early spring in drills two inches deep and one foot apart between rows.

After the plants Set them 15 inches apart each are one or two years old transplant them into permanent beds. way and cover four inches deep. Manure plentifully each fall, to be forked in very early in the spring, after which sow on a good dressing of salt, one oz. to 50 ft. of drill. White-— A distinct variety of strong, vigorous growth, producing Columbian Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; y4 lb., 30c; large white shoots that remain white as long as fit for use. lb., 70c, Conover's Colossal— standard sort of large size, tender and excellent quality. Pkt., Sc; oz., 10c; y4 lb., 30c; lb., ?0c B

Mammoth A

Summer Asparagus — Known “Cut and Come Again.” This most delicious vegetable worth a place in all gardens. The plant makes a strong growth, ASPARAGUS like summer crookneck squash. The fruit should be cut at four to six inches long and you should not allow any fruit to mature, as it stops the formation of new. fruit. Cook it just the same as asparagus. Yields wonderfully. Pkf., 10c; as

is

oz., 25c.

Beans, Garden Variety Wax and

string beans can be grown in very large quantities on very small plot of ground and are one of the best vegetables; can be used as green or snap as well as dried beans; is excellent for canning and pickling. The Pole beans are very desirable and can be planted in each hill of sweet corn, or individual stakes can beset for the plants. They yield enormously.

Plant as soon as danger of frost is past, in light, warm soil, in rows two feet apart, three inches apart in the rows. Keep well hoed and draw the earth up to the stems, but do not hoe when wet, as it will cause them to rust and injure the crop. Plant every two weeks One and one-half until about the middle of August for a succession. pounds to 100 feet of drill.

Gurney’s Everbearing

Wax

Bush Bean See colored plate page 33

The great campaign carried on by the for the canning of vegetables applied especially to fresh beans, the wax and green podded beans in the pod. This created a very heavy demand for beans suitable for canning purposes. planted a larger acreage than usual and have a fine crop, and you will find this not only the best for canning purposes, but the best for using fresh as string or snap beans. As its name implies, it is an ever-bearing bean, or a continuous bearer, over a period of six weeks; it is also rust-proof and practically immune from all other bean disThis bean is especially valuable eases, producing always a large crop. It proto the home gardener for all of the reasons named above. duces the most beautiful pod of any of the beans, generally of very beautiful shiny a wax, very length, of brittle and free from even pint, 20c; 1 lb., fiber, being absolutely stringless until ripe. 10 lbs., 30 lbs., 69 lbs., lbs., $3.00; $1.75; $6.00; $11. 40c; 5 * un Curry’s Rust Proof (45

Days to maturity.)

government

We

%

Wa

beans.



An

GURNEY’S RUST PROOF

WAX

This is the earliest of the black wax well-formed pods, tender, absolutely stringless.

against rust. of large,

It is a variety that it

when you sell means a re-

to your customer

order. It is excellent to be used as a string bean when the pods

formed and before the beans full grown. It can be used shelled bean when the beans are full grown but not ripe. 3xcellent. Vz pt., 15 lbs., $3.30; 60

CURRY’S RUST PROOF

WAX

15c;

lbs„

1866-HOUSE OF GURNEY, YANKTON,

S.

D.

— 1925

7

HODSON WAX



Wardwell Kidney Wax (45 days to maturity) An early prolific wax bean; hardy and productive; pods fiat, of a delicate waxy yellow and brittle; seed white, mottled brown around the eye. P*-, 15c; !b., 40c; 15 lbs., $3.30. Pencil Pod Black Wax (45 days to maturity). A most delicious rich dark yellow snap bean, being so tender and brittle that by taking it at either end and bending it, it will fly into several pieces. Abundant bearer. Seed black when ripe. Price: i/ pt., 15c; lb., 35c; 15 lbs., $3.25; 60 lbs., $11.00. 3 Hodson Wax Rust Proof Bush Bean (45 days to maturity). Remarkably strong grower, sturdy and productive. Has been entirely free from rust and blight. The plants are well loaded with long, straight, handsome pods averaging about seven inches in length; the color is a very bright yellow, making them very attractive; the pods are brittle and tender and of the very best flavor. They are free from fibre and stringless, while its fine table quality, its long handsome pods will render it of special value to the private gardener. pt., 15c; lb., 35c; 15 lbs., $3.25; 60 lbs., $11.00.



.

%



%

©avis Wax — (40

White

, makes it extra desirable for cooking purposes m its golden waxy stage. V3 pt., 15c; lb.. 35c; 15 lbs., $3.25; 60 lbs.,

.

DAVIS WHITE

WAX

$ 12 . 00 .

It

,

_



is

excellent for cooking. Personally, I prefer them to any Navy pt., 15c; 8b., 35c; 15 !bs., $3.00; 60 lbs., $11.00. Bean.

%

.

Golden Wax (40 days to maturity). The Golden Wax probably the earliest, and we believe the most generally planted and satisfactory of any of the old varieties. Pods are a bright, waxy yellow, good length, a little flatter than round, It is excellent entirely stringless, and of a fine, buttery flavor. Again, when the for cooking when the pods are just formed. beans are nearly ripe, as a shelled bean. An excellent sort for canning or pickling. A very heavy bearer, and withstands adverse conditions. The seed is white, mottled, red and purple. y3 pt., 15c; lb., 35c; 15 lbs., $3.25; 60 lbs., $11.50.

has outyielded all other varieties of wax beans under adverse conditions and given crops where other varieties plant is exceptionally healthy, compact, upThe failed. have right growth, carrying its pods in the center and well up from It seems to stand wet and dry weather better the ground. than other beans and always gives a large yield of handsome pods, long, flat, clear and waxy white. The dry beans are most all others.

,

,

days to maturity) This bean has taken the place of practically



Green Podded Varieties

Gurney’s Earliest Brittle Wax (40 days to maturity). This remarkably early clear white bean, delicious in quality, sti ingless in all stages of its growth, combined with its extreme earliness, makes it one of the most desirable for the garden, and as its name implies, it is of that degree of brittleness that



Navy Bean A great many people grow what they supis the Navy Bean, but is generally a mixed, uneven

pose

bean that cooks uneven and lacks quality. Our navy Beans are absolutely pure and hand picked. You will not find Per lb., 25c; 15 lbs., $2.25; 60 a bad bean in a bushel. lbs., $7.25.

Burpee’s

Green Pod



Stringless A very desirable dwarf podded snap

green

sort for the home garden and largely grown for the market. Theplants are large, spreading and

productive. The pods are medium green, five to six inches long, cylindiical, larger

than

Red

those of Valentine

but are quite as fleshy, of equally high quality

remain

and crisp

der

and

ten-

longer.

They mature a little later.

of

medium

and

Seed size

length, yel-

lowish

brown.

1/3 pt., 15c; lb., 35c; 15 lbs., $3.00; 60 lbs., $ 11 . 00 .

GURNEY’S BRITTLE

WAX

STRINGLESS GREEN POD

1866

8

— HOUSE

OF GURNEY, YANKTON,

S.

D.

— 1925

Pole or Running Large

— (85

White Lima

Pods broad and Seeds large, broad and white. 15c; lb., 40c; 15 lbs., $3.75. maturity).

days

to

rough.

%

pt„

Kentucky Wonder—-(70 days to This (Old Homestead.) maturity). climbing variety is very vigorous and productive and bears its pods in large The pods are green, very long, clusters. often being nine or ten inches, nearly and very crisp when stringless round, young, and so fleshy that they are greatThe seed is breadth. than er in width This is one long, oval, dun-colored. Beans Snap of the very best early Pole The for the home garden or market. purchases limited and supply of seed is should be made early. V3 pt., 15c; lb., 40c; 15 lbs., $3.75.



Golden Cluster Wax The flat pods Of a rich golden yellow; stringless and excellent in flavx or. White-seeded. /z Pt. 15c; lb., 40c; 15 lbs., $3.75. are 7 to8 inches long.

Bush Lima Improved Henderson Bush

Lima—

This is the very (70 days to maturity). early Sieva or Butter Bean of the South. The pods are ready for use a week earlier than those of Burpee’s Bush Lima and the plants are immensely productive. When gathered young the beans are of excellent flavor. Vs pt*» 15c; lb., 40c; 15 lbs,, $3.75.

Bush Lima large



The true bush form of the old grows vigorously to a height of 18 to

(Burpee’s)

Lima Bean.

It

20 inches, forming a circular bush, 2 or 2Y% feet in diameter, requiring no poles or stakes, yielding from 50 to 150 fine pods, similar in size and quality to those grown on the large white

Lima Beans.

V3 pt-> 15c; lb., 45c; 15 lbs*, $4.00.

week

in

May

and

for the winter use in June.

Long Smooth Blood

—The

standard long sort.



Ford hook Bush Lima (75 days to maturity). The very best large-seeded variety. The plant is vigorous, erect-growbearing well above the ground. The pods, which are produced in large clusters, are medium green, about four and three-fourths inches long, each containing three to five large beans of exceptionally fine quality. Don’t fail to plant some Prices; V 3 pt., 25c; of these in your garden this spring. 1 lb., 45c; 5 lbs., $2.00, ing,



We consider this the best the standard varieties. Best for forcing, best for first outdoor planting, roots very dark red, rounded on top, flat underneath. Small tops, which allow close plantPkt., 5c; oz., 10c; y4 lb., 30c; lb., 80c. ing. Improved Early Egyptian

Table Beets For an early supply sow as early in the spring as ground can be properly cultivated. Lay out the drills for seed about one foot apart and two inches deep. For the main crop, sow first

BUSH LIMA

first

early beet of

all

Pkt,,

Arlington Favorite— A new dark-leaved early blood va-

Detroit Dark Red Turnip grand beet for bunching for market; tops are exceedingly small and uniformly upright; roots are perfect turnip shape, with small tap roots. The principal fault with most Turnip Beets is the occasional appearance of white rings, and this will be found has been overcome by careful selection of the deepest red beets. Quality is the very best, sweet and tender. Gardeners can safely Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; \'4 lb,, 30c,; lb,, 80c. plant it largely.

riety; originated at Arlington, Mass., where it is grown exIt follows the Eclipse tensively for the Boston market. closely in maturing, but is of much darker color and superior in quality; perfectly round in shape, it differs from all other dark blood sorts, in that it has the sweetness of the Bassano, Its small, upright and yet a very dark, deep blood color. growing tops, early maturing, and the splendid shape and color of the roots make it popular with everyone. Pkt., Sc; oz-, 10c; 1/4 !b= ? 30c; ife. 80c.

5c; oz., 10c.;

y4

lb.,

30c; lb., 90c.

—A

1866

— HOUSE

OF GURNEY, YANKTON,

S.

D,— 1925

9

Gurney’s Early Model Globe See Colored Photo, Inside Front Cover One of our lady customers wrote us that the Model Globe Beet should be sold as an ornamental plant as well as a vegetable. I do not blame or wonder at her making this remark. A row of the Model Globe Beft ls ery orn amental. The foliage as well as the root, is purplish red, and would make an ornamental bed even in the best front yard. Tne Model Globe Beet is medium early, always even in size, color

/

and shape.

A number

of

newer varieties have been offered since we

offered the Model Globe, but they have never equaled this beet in the trial grounds or in the field. One of the most satisfactory uses of the Model Globe Beet is for pickling purposes, using them when they are about 1 inches through. They retain their color and are of excellent quality. Pkt., 10c; oz., 15c; lb., 40c; i/2 lb., 70c; 1 lb„,

%

%

GURNEY’S MODEL GLOBE Crosby’s Egyptian



It is large,

dark red, nea’ 'r spherical; one

of

the best for early planting outdoors. It is a most excellent sort, becoming Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; Vi lb., fit for use sooner than any other variety. 30c; 1 lb., 85c. Bassano Extra early pink, globular root, fresh white, circled with brightest pink. The very best extra early. Pkt., Sc; oz., 10c; Vi lb., 30c; 1 !b., 80c. Bastian Half Long An early half long beet, quality excellent and will produce nearly twice the weight in the same time as the early round beets. Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; Vi lb., 30c; 1 lb., 80c. Extra Early Eclipse An excellent sort; about as early as the Egyptian, but we consider it better because it is larger and of much finer quality. Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; Vi lb., 30c; Ob., 80c. Edmand’s Early Blood Turnip The very best sort for general crop. In quality one of the finest; exceedingly dark; shape globular, having one tap root. Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; Vi lb., 30c; 1 lb., 80c. Swiss Chard— For the leaves alone this variety is grown. This gathered young, should be cooked the same as spinach, or later the midribs may be cooked and served the same as asparagus. Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; Vi lb., 30c; 1 lb., 85c.









Root Crops

SWISS

CHARD

—Sugar Beets and Mangels

It is our purpose to give as much advice as possible in this catalog, advice that is worth while, coming as it does from long varied experiences of ourselves and our customers who have been kind enough to report, or where we have visited their

many farms and ranches. One of the best paying crops on a stock farm is the acreage of root crops. Their feeding value is high. The variation of feed to live stock is of nearly as much value as the feed itself. The yield per acre is enormous when proper selection of varieties and proper care is given the growing crop. It is not any more difficult to produce an acre of “root crops” than it is an acre of potatoes and none, of you would think of discontinuing your potato field. Potatoes do not always yield a full crop, even with best care, but you always plant again; other root crops

with good care almost invariably yield a much greater tonnage per acre than potatoes. Of the numerous kinds and varieties we would select the following for stock purposes:

Mangel Wurzel,

Mammoth

Long Red. This produces under good cultivation twenty tons per acre. If fed to milch cows will increase flow of milk about 25 per cent. Mangel Danish Sludstrup. Long reddish yellow root, probably best of all mangels. Sugar Beet These will not produce the tonnage per acre that mangels will, but on account of their greater sugar content they are of greater food value. Sugar beets are especially valuable for syrup purposes, for cooking, as you do any other table beet and for canning. A fair yield under good care would be 13 to 17 tons per acre. A load thrown to the hogs, another fed properly to milch cows, will add a vast addition to your year’s income. Carrots Any variety of table carrot listed except the very short, early varieties, will pay well and are of great value for stock purposes as well as for winter’s house use. An ordinary yield of carrots, table varieties, would be about 15 tons; of the mastodon variety, about 25 tons. Oz., 15c; Y4 lb., 25c; lb., 80c; 5 lbs., $3.50.



.



Mangels In foreign countries a man running a dairy or growing stock any kind for any purpose would be considered a mighty poor manager and in the end would be almost sure to fail, if he failed to grow a quantity of root crops each season. A ration of beet roots with the grain and hay will increase the milk flow at least 25 per cent. The fact that you can produce from 15 to 25 tons of beet roots per acre will, I believe, convince you that it is the greatest and most profitable crop you can grow. An acre of mangel beets can be produced, figuring all of the work from the first plowing of the land until they are harvested, stored, for not to exceed seventeen dollars per acre. of



Mammoth Long Red More generally grown than any Oz,, lOcf other sort; roots large, quality excellent. Vi lb., 20c; lb., 55c; 5 lbs., $2.50.

W. M. Brogan, Chelsea, Iowa. Nov. 13, 1924. With my order last year, you sent me a free package of pumpkin seed. You will note the result from the enclosed This is our boy, Pat Brogan and one of the pumpkins weighing one hundred pounds. Weather conditions were bad or the pumpkin would have been much snapshot.

larger.

YANKTON,

1866— HOUSE OF GURNEY,

10

S.

D.

— 1925

DANISH SLUDSTRUP MANGEL This most wonder* ful Mangel has been awarded a first class certificate several times by the Danish

Government,

which

the highest honor attained in Agricul-

is

tural circles in

Den-

mark. Sludstrup is a long reddish yellow root, but not so long as the Mammoth long red. It

grows more above ground and is

the

very easily harvested. The size of the roots, other varie-

like

all

ties,

depends entirely

upon circumstances. They are frequently grown to a size weighing from 15 to 20 pounds each. The Danish farmers preto grow them fer smaller, viz., 6 to 10 pounds each, which is

accomplished by not

much allowing so space in and between the rows. The smaller roots contain a higher percentage of dry matter, consequently the crop is more valuable than if large roots are Oz., 10c; grown. 40c; lib., 55c; lb., y2 5 lbs., S2.50.

DANISH SLUDSTRUP FOR SEED SELECTION





Giant Half Sugar Rose As its' name implies, this is a half Roots of much greater nutritive value than sugar beet. mangels. Yield nearly as large as the best of the mangels. Roots grow about one-half out of the ground, and are conveniently harvested. Oz.,10c; V2Bh.,35c;lb.,50c;5lbs.,$2.10. Golden Tankard One of the medium sized perfect shaped ones, can be grown closer than other varieties, giving as good Oz., 10c; y2 lb., 35c; 1 lb., 50c; yield as large varieties. 5 lbs., $2.10.

Vilmorene Sugar Beet It unites capacity for a large yield with an exceedingly rich flesh, making it the best for cattle feeding. Tops medium sized; roots above medium size, long top-shaped, growing slightly above the surface; white, washed with red at top; flesh fine grained and very sweet. Oz., 10c; 4 lb., 25c; lb., 60c; 5 lbs., $2.50.



y

White Klein Wanzelben Sugar Beet



This variety has proved to be a very valuable sort, not only in foreign countries, but as well in Colorado and other sections of this country, where it has been thoroughly tested. It has a rather long, slender root, very rich in sugar, and grows deeply sunk in the ground and it is claimed to yield under average conditions about sixteen tons to the acre, containing 12 to 13 per cent

Mrs. Harry Reid Long, Carter County, Mont., Feb. 28, 1924, I received your welcome letter with the check of $10.00, prize money from the largest Mammoth Pumpkin. I was ple.ased to. know that I had the largest and the second largest pumpkin. You ask me how I. handled the plants to grow such iftimense pumpkins. I planted the seed in good, rich ground, watered the plants when they were young and needed it and kept the weeds away and just watched them grow. Everybody can do the same with Gurney seed. I have never received seeds so good from other Companies. I regret I did not have a kodak when my garden was growing, as I know you would like to have a picture of it for your catalog.. I am enclosing $36.24 for my new garden seed order.

Oz., 10c;

y4

lb., 25c; lb.,

60c; 5 lbs., $2.50.

Mixed Table Sugar Beets and Mangels We

have just a few pounds of beet seed that has become mixed in handling. The germination is very high, all fresh and for stock purposes they will be equal to the best named varieties, but will not be all of one type. V2 lb., 25c; seeds,

1

lb.,

40c; 5 lbs., $1.75.

Borecole or Kale



Tall Kale

One of the very best plants known and much planted by German-Americans, but little used by for greens, well

others.

It is much hardier than cabbage frost improves its quality. The

and a good

leaves are very curly. Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; y4 lb., 30c; 1 lb., 95c.



Dwarf Green Hardy, prolific, flavor similar to cabbage; desirable in every garden. Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; y4 lb., 30c.

Broccoli Sow

early in spring. Transplant and cultivate the same as Cabbage. The Broccoli is similar to the Cauliflower. They will produce heads in October and November.

Large White

Mammoth— Pkt.,

10c;

oz., 35c; lb., $2.50.

Brussels Sprouts Cultivated for the small heads that grow in considerable numbers on the main stem, delmacy miicn esteemed by some. Sow in seed bed middle of storing and transplant ^ inte y Cabbage. Pkt,, 12c; cn., ZZf, y4 |fc., 60c; lb,, $2.25.

BRUSSELS SPROUTS

1866— HOUSE OF GURNEY,

YANKTON,

S.

D.

— 19 25

11

Celery Did you know that Northwestern grown celery will bring almost double the price on the market that the fancy Michigan and California celery will bring? Northwestern celery will not compare with these fancy brands in

size or looks, but in quality it is simply perfect. It is easily grown and every family should have some of this nutritious, healthy vegetable.

Sow in April and May and rake seed in lightly; water and shade from strong sun. Prepare trenches from two to four feet apart, a foot wide and a foot deep; dig into the bottom plenty of wellrotted manure, and set the plants when they are three: or four inches high,, six or eight- inches apart in each trench. Keep them shaded until started and gradually earth them up as they grow.

White Plume— Out in the State of California they produce and ship thousands of carloads of White Plume celery each year. We have received letters from some of the largest of the California celery growers, telling of the wonderful results from our White Plume 'seed, and we know that it will give you better results, as it has -them. Celery is one of the most delicious of the vegetables, can be grown easily in any small or large garden, and it you ask for it in placing your order a celery leaflet, giving full instructions, will be placed in your package. This is also true of practically all have bulletins on all of them for your special of the vegetables. Pkt., 10c; oz., 25c; i/4 lb., 70c; 1 lb., $2.00. benefit.

We

Golden Self»B!eachang Celery

Like -the White' Plume, Celery requires very little earthing up, and in many other respects it is similar to that favorite sort, differing, however, in color, which is yellowish, the heart being large and solid and of a beautiful golden hue. Pkt., 15c; oz., 40c; V4 lb., $1.00; l/2 lb., $1.75; 1 lb. $3.00. Giant Pascal Grows about two feet high,- the stalks are very broad, thick and crisp, and entirely stringless; the width this

and thickness of the stalks are distinctive features of this variety. It bleaches with but slight “earthing up,” and very quickly, usually in five or six days. Pkt., 5c; oz., 20c; y4 lb., 50c; lb., $1.50. .

Winter Queen

— Sown in

the roots become well developed. When they are dried, roasted or ground, they become the chicory of commerce, and are used in adulterating coffee. Pkt., 5c; oz., 15c; y4 lb., 40c; lb., $1.50. drills,

5c; oz., 10c;

y4

and well known. —Common 75c.

to

Leaves tender and highly flavored.

Cauliflower For spring crops only the extra early dwarf varieties should be selected and seed sown in hotbeds early in February, transplanting the young plants to the garden early in April, wheq the trees are starting out in leaf. For main or fall crop seed should be sown about June 1st, and young plants set out during the latter part of July. Gurney’s Earliest Market Cauliflower This wonderful new short-stemmed," large-headed, heavy-leafed Cauliflower was offered by us in 1910 for the first time, and we wish to say to all lovers of this delicious, vegetable that you can grow these as easily as you can grow the cabbage. It is a sure heading variety, nearly every plant making a good, solid head. Is desirable for market gardeners on account of earliness and clear white color, which creates an unusual



for

it.

Pkt., 20c; oz., $2.00.



Early Snowball This is a popular extra early strain of dwarf, compact growth. Under favorable circumstances nearly every plant It is valuable for both early will make a fine solid head of good size. and late. Pkt., 10c; y4 oz., 50c; oz., $1.50; y4 lb., $4.50. Extra Early Dwarf Erfurt (Extra Selected) This is the choicest selected strain of the popular Erfurt type and is remarkable -for its



extreme

reliability in heading. 4 lb., $5.00.

y

$1.50;

Vetches,



Plants very dwarf.

Autumn Giant— The

cially desirable for

mixed

pickles.

Pkt., 10c; oz.,

best large late Pkt., 10c; oz..

Mrs. Henry Henle, Sr., Jones County, I have already sent you my order, but I very thankful way for all the profit we g Out of 15c worth of Onion seed, I raised a 30c worth of Tom Watson Watermelon seec in a

worth and had enough left for ourselves and all our neighbors; out .of $1.25 worth of Cossack alfalfa seed, I sold $29.00 worth and have several pounds left for next Spring’s planting, and also, harvested four ton of good hay from it. The above is proof enough that you should get all your seeds from the House of Gurney and I am proud that I have been doing

so.

Mrs. Louis E. Nelson, Lake County, S. D. May 27, 1924. The seeds and plants that I ordered came in excellent condition. Thank you so much for the extras sent, especially the ,

I certainly love them. always have great fun in

Peas. I

Gurney

seeds.

my

late

You ask me

garden, grown

to.

We are now handling your seeds exclusively and are going

Pkt.,

Pkt., 10c.

demand

for

The demand

lb., 35c; lb.,

True Water Cress

by growers

IV! ar. 22, 1924. to tell you why I sell so many of your seeds. for your seeds which this store has established is largely due to the good quality of them as they are indeed what you express in your slogan, “Seeds that Grow and They are doing all of that for everybody we sell Satisfy.”

.

them

Cress Curled or Peppergrass

regarded

-

Meisenholder Department Store, Vermillion, S. D.

ChicoryLarge Rooted, or Coffee

—Highly

keeping, preserving its solidity and tenderness very late in the spring. Vigorous in growth and of attractive appearance. Pkt., 5c; oz., 15c; y4 lb., 50c; lb., $1.75.

push them harder

this

Season than ever.

YANKTON,

1866— HOUSE OF GURNEY,

12

S.

D.— 1925

Celeriac variety of celery having turnip-shaped roots which, when cooked and sliced in vinegar, makes a most excellent salad. Large Smooth Prague This is the largest and best variety !b. f 60c; grown, and grows to a large size. Pkt., 5c; oz., 20c; i lb., $2.00.

A



%

Carrots you have never grown root crop® for stock, do not neglect it any longer. It will be the most profitable acre on your farm. Cultivate with your corn cultivator if you have plenty of it planted. If not, plant them with your Planet Jr., in the spring, rows 12 to 18 inches apart, and cultivate with Planet Jr. Wheel Hoe during the summer. One man with a Planet Jr. Cultivator will handle two acres per day. A wagon load of these thrown into the feeding yard reduces the chance of disease and is a mighty satisfactory change of food. If

20 to 25 tons per acre. Is actually one of the most valuable and health giving vegetables grown. A great many people do not realize that it is the most delicious You can commence using them when they of all the vegetables. are one-half inch through and use them continuously until they are full grown, and then they are excellent all winter.

CELERIAC



Early Chantenay Carrot This carrot is considered by the market gardeners as one of the very best for early use; it grows about six inches long, very uniform in size and shape, stump-rooted, verv smooth, deep red, fine grained, sweet. Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; V4 lb., 30c; 1 lb., 51.00. Gurney’s Pie Carrots We do not suppose you have ever made or eaten a carrot pie; very few people know that carrots are good for pie purposes and probably pone of you have known that any particular variety or kind of carrot would make a better pie than another. Carrots for pie purposes are at least equal to pumpkins, and' the pie resembles in flavor the pumpkin pie, but is much more delicious and on account of your being able to use them long before the pumpkins are ripe you have almost a continuous season of carrot pie, commencing with the carrots when they are about one inch through, and using them Make the carrot pie just as you until the old carrots. are gone in the spring. would pumpkin pie, and you will be surprised at the deliciousness of it. This particular carrot is better than any other variety for that purpose. Pkt., lb., 50c. 10c; oz., 20c; Earliest French Forcing-^Small, almost globular root, maturing in about 40 days, valuable for market gardeners on account of its earliness. Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; i/4 lb., 35c; lb., $1.20. {Rubicon Half Long It has rapidly grown in popularity, until now it is more largely grown than all other varieties combined. It is best in shape, deep redorange colored flesh, finest of all in quality. Earlier than Danvers, about the same length, but heavier and thicker at the shoulders, making it more productive; the leaves shorter, fewer and finer. It. is a wonderfully heavy cropper, producing AND thirty to forty tons to the acre under good field culture. Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; V4 lb., 30c; lb., 90c.



%





Guerende or Ox-Heart A variety with short, thick roots, the diameter often exceeding the length. Color, bright orange. Sweet and fine grained; good for table or stock. Pkt., Sc; oz,, 10c; lb,, 30c; 1 lb,, 90c,

%

EARLY CHANTENAY

Jesse Wheeler, Dixon County, Nebr, June 28, 1924. We are well pleased rwith all of our- purchases from the House of Gurney, tainlyfkave a fine grove of your trees set out five years ago this Spring. Mrs. Wheeler will hardly plant a garden seed ufiless it is from Gurney’s.

Janies Brobin, St, Louis County, Minn. Sept. 24, 1924. You will be interested in the picture of my two boys and the Mammoth Pumpkins, which I grew from seed sent me last Spring. These pumpkins took first prize at the Fair and they were a great curiosity as they looked exactly like watermelons, although they turaed-yellow on the underside. The best of it was that We took the prize away from' a man that has never missed before, sd we are going to keep the record up and grow larger ones next year.

The Sweet Peas from your seed

are

still

blooming,

al-

though we have had several heavy frosts. All the seed w e got from you gave good results. In fact, our garden was better than most people’s. r

Danvers— There grown which

Will

is

no variety

produce as

much

to the acre with a minimum length of root, as this one. Under proper condition of the soil and cultivation it may reasonably be expected to produce, which it has done, 25 to 30

tons per acre. length is

GURNEY'S PIE CARNOT

a

It

is

of

medium

and heavy at the neck;

rich orange.

color

Pkt., 5c; OZ-,

10c; Vi lb,, 3*V; lb.. 90c.

!

1866-HOUSE OF GURNEY, YANKTON,

S.

D.— 1925

13

GURNEY’S GOLD LUMP Improved Long Orange I

j!

I

—A

well-known standard

sort,

roots long, thickest near the crown, tapering regularly to a point; color deep orange; suitable for the table and main field crop. Fkt., 5c; oz., 10c; Vi lb., 30c: lb., 90c.

Mastodon—Giant white, best and largest stock carrot grown, nearly one-half its length will be above ground when mature, which makes it easy to harvest. Will produce as many, tons of green feed per acre as any vegetable grown. Pkt., 5c; oz., 15c; lb., 25c; 1 lb., 80c; 5 lbs., $3.50. Gurhey’s Gold Lump One of our customers sent us this picture. Said he could not resist the temptation Ho just go

%



pull a few and have their “mugs” taken. He tells us it is just a little time after you have planted the seed until you have a full grown carrot. You can grow them mighty thick, and the quality is the very best.

This new carrot is of French origin, is the brightest golden grows about 3 inches long and matures earlier than any other carrot grown. Market gardeners can safely discard It is very all other extra earlier and plant largely of this. uniform in size and color, consequently a money-maker, as there are no culls to throw out. Pkt., 10c; oz., 29c; Vi lb., color,

$ 1 . 00 .

Cabbage The high farmer and

cost of living can be materially reduced the person in town with just a town lot,

by the if

they

plant more gardens. The garden should always contain a quantity of cabbage because it can be used in so many ways and is in demand by the housewife almost every day. They will yield very large quantities of good wholesome food, and are one of the easiest of all the vegetables grown. Can be kept all winter in an ordinary root cellar or basement of the house. We print small booklets of instructions for planting, care, diseases, pests, and how to destroy them for pracIn placing your order do not tically every vegetable listed. They are written by fail to include these free instructions. experts and will often save you a crop with just a few minutes’ work. Sow the seed in the hot-bed or cold frame, thinner than usual, so that every plant will be good and strong. Transplant often so that when they go into the field you will not have to replant, and in this way make one-half pound of seed will

do where you used one pound before. You can do it. Sow one ounce for 3,000 to 4,000 plants. Four ounces for one acre if plants are to be transplanted. If drilled in the field and thinned out 1 pounds per acre.

Y

St.

John’s Day Extra Early, Extra Dry Weather Cab-

—Distinct

variety, with extremely short stem. Head very hard and compact, round. Pkt., 5c; oz., 20c; Vi lb., 65c; 1 lb., $1.50.

bage



Extra Early Express Produces fair sized heads in 80 to It is earlier than Etampes, although not quite as An important acquisition for the market Gardener large. 85 days.

for very early use.

Pkt., 5c; oz., 20c; Vi lb., 75c; 1 lb., $2.00.



Early Jersey Wakefield One of the best of the conical types. Very early and makes medium sized, very solid heads Has few outside leaves. Price fine flavored and terider. pkt., 5c; oz., 25c; Vi lb., 70c; 1 ib., $2.25.



Charleston or Large Wakefield This cabbage is of the same type as the Early Jersey Wakefield, but is about 50 per cent larger. The heads are very solid and tender. Matures about a week later than tlie Early Jersey Wakefield ,

Price, pkt., 5c; oz., 20c; Vi lb., 70c; lb., $2.25.

Jessie Haskell, Pennington County, S. D. Feb. 5, 1924. I have ordered seeds from you for four years and I find them to be the best. I recommend your seeds to all of my neighbors.

Early Winningstadf Another of the conical type, maturing about the same time as The heads are the Wakefields. very pointed and the leaves somewhat fluted ori the edges. For the private garden it is one of the best and in point of tenderness or Pkt., flavor it has no superior. 5c; oz., 20c; Vi lb., 65c; 1 lb., $ 2 . 00 .

Copenhagen Market

— The

best Early Round headed sort on the market. The heads are very

8 pounds. the heads growing very close to the ground. Matures with Charleston Wakesolid, averaging about It is short stemmed,

and will give a heavier crop per acre. Our stock of this is very fine. Price, pkt., 10c; oz., 25c; Vi lb., 90c; 1 lb., $2.50.

field

Ralph Eagle Feather, Todd County, S. D. Feb. 12, 1924. premiums of anyone. I have a friend who comes to the Rosebud Indian Fair and wins the most Long Wolf and he says he purchases all of his seeds from Gurney’s. have grown mysell. He shows me many different kinds of vegetables and better than any I Send ine your catalog so that I may buy from you.

His name

is

William

1866— HOUSE OF GURNEY,

14

YANKTON,

S.

D.

— 1925

CABBAGE— SECOND EARLY AND SUMMER VARIETIES Enkhuizen Glory— Our bage piakes

it

and leads us

experience with this cabappear more valuable to us each season

to

recommend

it

most highly.

It pro-

duces a large percentage of perfect solid heads. It is one of the best to follow after the early sorts. Pkt., 10c; oz., 25c; lb., 80c; 1 lb., $2.40. All Head Early Without doubt this cabbage is unexcelled as an Early Flat Dutch or Summer variety. It makes very uniform, large, deep, flat heads and Withstands heat and dry is a very sure header. weather very well. The grain of this variety is very Pkt., Sc; oz., 20c; Vi lb., 65c; 1 lb., $2.00. fine. Flat Dutch A very good variety for second Makes good sized flat heads and is very ;. nd of fine grain. It is similar to All Head. leaves, Pkt., 5c; oz., 20c; Vi lb.,

%





Sauer Kraut In 1926, we are going to publish a Recipe Book, covering the best methods of cooking and caring for vegetables

and

fruits.

w ant someone

to win the $1.00 for the best ihethod Cabbage into delicious Bauer Kraut, also; and cooking cabbage alone or in connection with other vegetables or meat.. Each recipe used, by us will be paid fpr at the rate of $1.00 each. How many dollars can you get from it? Do not stop with recipes on Cabbage, but include anything in the fruit and vegetable line. You, undoubtedly, have a special way and at. least, a local reputation for cooking or preparing some of the vegetables or fruits better than anyone in the neighborhood. Let’s have your, way. I

r

of converting

recipes for cold slaws

.

.

Late Varieties Premium Late

Flat

Dutch

—As

a variety for winter

market it has no superior, and is more extensively grown than any other. Heads large, bluish green, round, solid, broad and flat on top, and often tinted with reddish brown after being touched with frost; they open white and crisp, are tender and well flavored. It is a fall and winter variety, and one of the very best to keep. Decidedly the best, late variety for cultivation in our state. Vi lb., 60c; lb., S1.75.

Premium

Late

Pkt., 5c; oz., 2Gc;

Drumhead —We recommend

this sort,

market gardeners and growers for shipping purposes. In good, rich soil and with a favorable season, the heads

to

will grow to an enormous size. Very compact and solid, and of excellent flavor. Pkt., 5c; oz.. 20c; Vi lb., 60c; lb..

Mrs. Roland Warner, Banner County, Nebr. Apr, 26, 1924. I am, again, sending my order for garden and flower I would only do this if previous purchases were seeds. satisfactory. I have planted your seed for the last six years and they have assured me each year of a splendid -

garden; in fact, the best in the neighborhood. I am going to plant some of your trees and shrubs.

LATE FLAT DUTCH Danish Ball Head

—One

of the best varieties for general crop.

has been selected for more than fifty years, by the Danish garwho grow it almost exclusively for Winter Cabbage and annually export large quantities. The heads are not as large as late Dutch Flats, but harder and more solid, fine grained and good Pkt., 10c; oz., 25c; lb., 80c; lb., $2.25. It

deners,

%



•Tidinmoth Rock Red This is by far the best, largest and The plant is large, surest heading red cabbage ever introduced. with numerous spreading leaves. The head is large, round, very Pkt., 10c; oz„ 25c; Vi lb., $1.00; solid and deep red color. lb., $3.00.

Gus Guston, Cass County, Minn,

Apr. 22, 1924= Seeds received and we are well pleased with them, as we have always been with goods from you. I planted many of these today and could not help but notice how clean and perThere is surely lots of satisfaction in fect the seeds were. planting seeds of high-grade like those you send. We make good use of the free bulletins.

1866

— HOUSE

OF GURNEY, YANKTON,

S.

D.— 1925

15

Gurney’s Early Ball Head Cabbage

I 1

i!

1

i

t

'

In offering this new early summer Ballhead Cabbage we know that we are presenting the cabbage growing public with a wanner and a money-maker and a great deal of satisfaction. This cabbage The heads are perfectly closely resembles the Danish Ballhead. round, good size and mature as early as Wakefield. They are exceptionally good keepers and the late plantings will keep equal to the We recommend this sort especially to market winter varieties. gardeners and for the home garden for both early and late. We feel sure it will take the place of nearly all of the summer varieties, producing a greater per cent of solid heads than any of them, and on account of the small amount of foliage and the compact form in which it grows, can be planted much closer than other varieties. We are offering this feeling sure that it is one of the best articles Pkt., 10c; oz., 35c; Vi lb., in the vegetable line we have offered. $1.20; 1 lb., $3.50.

Mrs. Kate Chilton, Kossuth County, la. Mar. 4, 1924. I am thanking you for the seeds which I received and can say that I never received such large packages of seeds from any other House. I often received much more paper from others, but not so many seeds and never such high quality ones.





GURNEY’S BALL HEAD

*

Chinese Cabbage Pe-Tsai or Celery Cabbage



I

believe there have been

more disappointed custom-

ers of seed houses over this vegetable than any other. It has only been offered for the last few years, and there are so many varieties of it that seedsmen generally have had a difficult time in establishing a correct variety to offer to the trade. have tried out practically every variety offered, and there is only one that we shall offer in the future. All others have failed to head entirely, or made only a small percentage of marketable heads. Those that failed to make heads have produced immense quantities of seeds. The heading varieties produced but few seed. The Chinese Cabbage is one of the very valuable vegetables and will never be discarded. It is suitable for the usual cabbage purposes, especially valuable as a salad. It has the combined flavor This should be planted at about the same of cabbage, turnip, celery and mustard. season as lettuce for early use, followed by other plants during the summer. Cut these for fall and winter use just as you do other cabbage heads, storing in the same way. Pkt., 10c; oz., 35c.

We

Cucumbers Do

not plant cucumbers before danger of frost has passed, as the plants are very tender and the least frost will damage or kill them. Plant in hills or rows four feet apart, 10 to 15 seeds to each hill, thinning out later; make soil very rich. For pickles plant from June 1st to the middle of July. A fellow I don’t know as there is any use in my talking to you about cucumbers. certainly cannot do a subject justice if he doesn’t like what he is talking about, and positively the only time I can look a cucumber in the face is when the vines are commencing to run and the fields are covered with millions of yellow flowers. This time is when the thousands of little fellows, about an inch to an inch and a half long, are picked and made into pickles. At that time I know and relish a good cucumber. As the cucumber increases in size and they commence to bring him in sliced, I am not there. The next time I enjoy looking at the I will let the other fellow eat him, but not me. cucumber is when the fields are covered with the beautiful yellow bronze ripe ones, ready for the seed thresher. It is really a wonderful sight to see fields of cucumbers with hundreds of thousands of the ripe fruit, all practically alike, the ground fairly covered with them, so easy to grow so good when made into pickles, for myself, and Anyone I expect I will have to agree with the millions of people who eat them sliced. can grow a cucumber. r

,

PE-TSAI

Davis Perfect Cucumber It is

seldom that any one cucumber or other will, stand permanently at the top of

vegetable all

others in quality, yield, etc., for as

much

as

But the Davis Perfect has been on the market for about that time and its nearest competitor is so far behind that it seems safe to predict that Davis Perfect will be the best for a number of years. We have grown this in large fields for seed purposes and the cucumbers would lay so thick on the ground that you could hardly walk It produces a without stepping on them. eight or ten years at a time.

very small quantity of seed, in fact, less per cucumber than any other cucumber grown. This makes it specially desirable for slicing or for sweet pickles. Rkt., 10c; oz., 15c; »/4 lb., 40c; 1 lb., $1.35.

DAVIS PERFECT

.

1866— HOUSE OF GURNEY,

16

YANKTON,

S.

D.— 1925 Improved Early White Spine

—This

special

strain

Spine Cucumber

is

of

White

noted for

its

extra earliness, earlier than Fordhook or Arlington. Vines vigorous,

fruiting

early

and abun-

dantly; fruit uniformly straight and handsome, dark green, with a few white spines; flesh tender

and of excellent flavor. Great bearer, for table use or pickling. !b., 40c; Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; 1 lb-, $1.25,

%

Early Cluster

—Early,

short,

and

prickly, bears in clusters. Pkt,, 5c; oz,, 10c; y4 lb., 35c; 1 lb,, $1.15.

New



Everbearing

Very

early, enormously productive, literally covering the ground with fruit the entire season until frost, making it the

variety in existence size

and

rich,

in color, shape long, for pickling or slicing.

5c;

Chicago

or

Pickling

WesterfieSd

— Medium

length,

pointed, with large, prominent spines; color deep green. Sc; ©z.. 10c; y4 lb., 40c; lb,, $1.25,

Pkt.,

—Oval-shaped and prickly; for pickling Pkt., 8c; oz., 20c. only. variety, grows Improved Extra Long Green —An extra Gherkin or Burr

For early and

very long, very productive.

fine late crops, excellent

oz„ 10c;

y4

lb., 40c;

lb„ $1.25,

EARLY WHITE SPINE

Pkt., 10c? oz., 15c; l/4 lb,, 45c; 1 lb,, $1,35, Earliest of All Cucumbers This is a white spine sort, very dark green; when fit to slice, 6 to 7 inches long; has pale green stripes about ]4 length from blossom end, straight square ended, firm, and makes a fine pickier. This is a great favorite among market gardeners and others desiring a good, Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; y4 lb,, 40c; 1 lb., prolific cucumber. for pickles.



i

.

$1.25. !

Lemon Cucumber Here is a cucumber in the shape of a lemon and having a flavor that at once puts it ahead of the common cucumber. It is bound to become It is an excellent shipper, and a great favorite as a table delicacy. picked as a gherkin $ 2 , 00 .

is

delicious.

Pkt., 10c; oz., 20c;

%

i

THE

\

lb., 70c; lb.,



White Wonder Cucumber Color of White Wonder is nearly pure white. It grows to good size, usually 8 to 10 inches long, and is In season almost the same as the White Seine, but very uniform. keeps in eatable condition longer. Flavor is pleasing and flesh firm and crisp—fine sliced or in salads. Its smooth, clear surface makes the White Wonder an ideal piclde. Aside from excellent qualities of fruit White Wonder bears a great quantity of them. A packet of seed will furnish you cucumbers in abundance. Pkt,, 10c; oz., 25c; l/4 lb., 75c; 1 lb., $2.25. snow

W.

A.

Bliss,

May 21, 1924received the ounce of Early Model Globe first shipment also, several trial packages

Emmett County. Mich.

In last night’s mail

I

Beet that was short in the

,

and pumpkin seed. Many thanks for them. Such prompt service in making good or correcting errors, builds permanent friends and customers for your Company. of flower, lettuce

LEMON CUCUMBER

Corn, Sweet or Sugar the most satisfactory of all of the grains for table use, and can be made to cover a period from the first of July until the heavy frosts of Fall, if you use proper varieties and The earliest of all sweet corn is the season for planting. Malakhof. By planting this about May 10 to 15 you will have good roasting ears of excellent quality by the first of Plant at the same time Golden Bantam and you will July. have corn a week to ten days later, follow this with Gurney’s Early Golden, then Mammoth White Corey, then Early

This

is

Minnesota and then Country Gentleman or Stowell’s Everand you will have a supply of delicious roasting eats through the entire season. If there are any of these varieties you like better than the other, simply make your plantings about one week apart of that variety and you will accomplish green,

results.

A great many farmers, the very fellows who should have the very best of everything, depend on their field corn for roasting By so doing you are missing the most delicious grain ears. you can have. If your planting is a little larger than can be used in the house, stock of all kinds appreciate it, and it is worth 50c more per hundredweight for fattening purposes than the ordinary field corn.



Early Minnesota A very popular early Corn, ears fair uniform and of excellent quality. V3 pt., 15c; 1 lb,, 30c; 15 lbs,, $2.75; 50 lbs,, $7,50; 1Q0 lbs,, $14,00,

size,

Mammoth White Cory —Produces wonderful yields. This comes in immediately after the Malakhof and. will outyield

all

other early varieties.

The

quality

is

strictly

first

class, size of ear much larger than other varieties of early corn, and an exceptionally profitable variety for market gardeners. V3 pt., 15c; 1 lb., 30c; 15 lbs., $2.75; 50 lbs., $7,50; 100 lbs., $14.00.



Stowell’s Evergreen Sweet Corn Due to an oversight, our 1915 catalog failed to list Stowell’s Evergreen Sw'eet Corn. until that catalog was issued how many fellows wanted Stowell’s Evergreen. We were “swamped” with letters from the time the catalog went out until past planting season wondering why we had discontinued Stowell’s. Of course, this took a personal letter to all of the people who wanted it and we told them we had the same strain of Stowell’s we had been selling them for several years. Absolutely the best of this late, delicious sweet corn. We grow Stowell’s in large quantities and we will always grow StoweU’s Evergreen until they get something better. V3 pt., 15c; 1 lb., 35c; 15 lbs., $3.00; 50 lbs., $8.50; 100 lbs., $1S,00.

We never knew



Golden Cream Sweet Corn (See colored photograph on colored insert, Page 32.) There are two standard varieties of sweet corn which are outstanding in quality. They are Golden Bantam and Country Gentleman, and the Golden Cream is a cross of the two. It is of irregular rows like the Country Gentleman, retaining the quality and the deep kernel A golden yellow,, early maturing, of this most desirable corn. high yielding, large eared, delicious corn, being ready for table use about ten days later than Golden Bantam and retaining Price, y3 pt., 20c; its table qualities several days longer. y2 lb.. 30c; 1 lb., 45c; 5 lbs,, $1.75; 10 lbs.. $2,75; 25 !bs„ $5,90; 50 lbs, T $9,00,

1866

— HOUSE

OF GURNEY, YANKTON,

S.

D.

— 1925

17

...

p%»rj

PROFESSOR

;

,

!

N. E.

HANSEN’S MALAKHOF SWEET CORN

This picture shows the first ear of the Malakhof picked in our field this year. I regret that the boys did not give me the date of the planting and picking, but they said that the Malakhof was so much earlier than any other variety that One of our market gardeners I did not need the information. says that he gets the Malakhof so much earlier than others that people are always willing to pay 25c per dozen for these little delicious ears.

Professor Neils

Hansen has

originated a great

many

things

and fruits, but he did not originate this Malakhof Sweet Corn, but found it in Russia, in one of his early trips He brought it because he considered it the to that country. earliest and sweetest sweet corn and that it would fill a place not yet taken by any other variety. The color of this sweet corn varies from an amber to a clear white.' It matures the earliest of any variety; planting, say, by the 15th of May, you are practically sure of good roasting" ears of mighty good in vegetables

by the 1st of July. The gardeners in and around Yankton sell this corn ahead of all other varieties, and from

quality

twenty to twenty-five cents per dozen ears. It will produce often three to four ears to the stalk. They are not large ears, but nearly as large as Golden Bantam. Coming, as they do, ten days ahead of Golden Bantam, it makes it specially pleasing and profitable to grow it. Everyone with either small or large garden can include some of the Malakhof. We would advise for an ordinary family at least one pound of this seed. We are still growing our stock from the original seed. V& pt,, 15c; 1 lb., 40c; 13 lbs., $3.25. C. E. iVSaln, Clark County, Washington. Apr. 5, 1924. I

received the seeds and like your business methods, as

well as the goods purchased

from you.

GOLDEN BANTAM Golden Bantam

— Fifty per cent

of the

sweet corn planted

It the United States is of the Golden Bantam variety. one of the earliest and sweetest, yielding very heavily, proOn ducing good sized ears of the most excellent quality. account of the seed being very hardy it allows early planting, consequently it reaches the roasting ear stage very early. You can sow this as early as any variety of field corn. The stalks grow only about 4 to 5 feet high and bear generally two good ears to the stalk. When ready for use the kernels a mighty satisfying sweet corn. are rich golden yellow color i/ pt., 15c; 1 lb., 35c; 15 lbs., $3.00; 50 lbs., $8.50; 100 !bs„ 3 in

Rudolph A. Olson, Chippewa County, Minn.

is



July

3, 1924.

let you know that the seed I ordered from you grew good and are producing a wonderful garden. The free package of poppy seeds are just wonderful; the most beautiful flower I have ever grown. I am proud to be a Gurney customer. I

want- to

$16.00,



Country Gentleman The most delicious of all; for private family use where quality is preferred to size it has no equal. The cob is very small, giving great depth to the kernels.

of ripening a little later than Stowells Evergreen, pt., 15c; V2 lb., 25c; 1 lb., 35c; 15 lbs., $3.25; 50 lbs,, $9.50; ICO lbs., $18.00.

Time

#

Gurney’s Early Golden Sweet Corn This sweet corn was originated by us here at Yankton, a In color cross of the Golden Bantam and Early Evergreen. it is a bright yellow, the quality is equal to either the Evergreen or the Golden Bantam, size of ear 50 per cent larger than the Golden Bantam, and the average yield from 40 per cent to 60 per cent over the Golden Bantam. It is always advisable to plant your garden for as much of a succession of crops as possible. Sometimes the same variety planted at

different times during the season produces the best results* but in sweet corn we advise the planting of three varieties. We would plant the Golden Bantam for first early, the Gurney Early Golden for second early, Evergreen for third. But if you are going to plant only a small patch in the garden anci expect to get along with that, you will get the greatest % P*»» l5c» satisfaction and yield from this Early Golden. 1 lb., 40c; 13 lbs. $3.25.

1866

18

— HOUSE

OF GURNEY, YANKTON,

S.

D.

— 1925



DeWolf’s Early Acme Sweet Corn In placing this new creation of sweet corn before the world a fourth time, I cannot but feel that if rightly appreciated and widely introduced as it should be on its merits, increased wealth and pleasure will be added through the corn growing section. It is the sweetest and yields from two and one-half to three times as much as the very best of the white varieties. Consequently, it will displace all other It will yield equally as many bushels to the acre as varieties for home use and canning. the best field corn, and on account of its earliness and greater food value, it will be used for hogging down the last week in July, and will displace other early varieties of field corn for this purpose. It made a yield for the originator in 1920 of 362 bushel baskets of ears per acre. Some have objected to its color, saying that yellow was preferable to white. By growing this variety, you will produce white corn that will produce golden dollars in abundance at the end of the season, so that you may have both the white and the yellow. It will make cattle and hog feeding possible and profitable five hundred miles farther north than at present, giving that extended area a cultivated crop to rotate with small grains, thus keeping the fertility of the soil always on a paying basis. Price, Vs pt.» 25c; V2 lb., 45c; 1 lb., 75c; 5 lbs., $2.00; 25 lbs., $7.00; 50 lbs., $13.00.

From Frank Wilder, The Mandan News. Morton County, N. D. I purchased one pound of your DeWolf’s Early Acme sweet corn. I planted this one kernel in the place in rows three feet apart, kernels eight to ten inches apart. Two of these rows furnished sweet corn for our table from the. 25th of July until the 13th of September. The other 13 rows I have cut and shocked'. The stalks of this corn grow from ten to twelve feet high and attract much attention, but you can see that it is remarkably early from the fact that we commenced using it July 25th.



Sweet Fodder There summer and fall green feed

is nothing better for or for curing for winter

than Sweet Corn; being sweet and palatable, cattle eat every part of the stalks and leaves. Always a great favorite with dairy farmers, and excellent for soiling. Can be planted as other corn

om sowed

thickly in drills or broadcast. Sow Yi bushel per acre in drills, 1 to 1 Yi bushels broad15 lbs., $1.50; 50 lbs., $4.00; 100 lbs., $7.50.

cast.

Popcorn About one farmer in ten grows Popcorn, even the little amount that is required for the children’s popping during the winter months, when it is enjoyed so much. Give the children this year a little spot in the garden where they can plant at least one pound of the White Rice Popcorn, for their own use this coming winter. I would bet you dollars to doughnuts that the little shavers will never let this popcorn bother you, but they will hoe and cultivate it and produce a greater money yield, per square rod, than you will in the best acre of your own cornfield. Give the kids a try at it. It will yield from eight to ten tons of fodder per acre of as high feeding value as sweet corn. It matures very early, which is an advantage where you are going to be short of earty feed for the stock. It can be planted at least Twice as thick as other varieties of cornand the yield of ear or shelled corn is usually equal to that of field corn. The market price is much better than for other varieties of corn, and is always marketable. Plant at the rate of 6 to 8 quarts to the acre. White Rice— Vs pt., 15c; 1 lb., 25c; 14 lbs., $1.80; 56 lbs., $4.50; 100 lbs., $8.00. Red Rice Fancy seed, bright red, Vs pt., 30c; 1 9b. 65c. Japanese Hulless— Vs pt., 20c; 1 lb., 30c; 14 lbs., $2.25; 100 lbs., $12.00. Popcorn for Popping 1 Sb. carton, 20c; 4 for 60c; 3 for $1.00.

DEWOLF EARLY ACME





M.

J.

DEWOLF

DANDELION Much esteemed for greens, which are cooked like mustard and spinach. The cultivated Dandelion is much superior to the wild one for greens. Sow the seed in May or June on good, rich soil, and thoroughly cultivate, when the leaves will be ready to cut the following spring.

Improved Large Leaved best cutting variety. thick. Pkt., 10c.

Plant

—The is

largest leaved and compact and leaves are

Egg Plant Sow in hotbeds very

early in the spring and transplant to 2 or 3 feet apart, in very rich, warm ground. Hoe often and hill up gradually until they blossom.



New Improved New York Purple The best variety in cultivation, being early, a sure cropper and of fine quality. The fruit is large, oval, very deep purple. Pkt., 10c; oz., 40c; lb., $1.50; lb., $5.00.

%

Garlic



Garlic This vegetable is very much in demand for use with meats, sausages, etc. can furnish in anv quantity. 1 lb., 45c; 2 lbs., 80c; 10 lbs., $3.75.

We

Kohl-Rabi



Early White Vienna Dwarf, small, early; bulb handsome, firm, glossy white; leaves few and small, the best variety for table but should be used when young and not larger than an early Turnip. All varieties are tough and stringy when overgrown. Pkt., 10c; oz., 20c;

V4

Sb., 50c; lb., $1.50.

NEW YORK PURPLE

1866

— HOUSE

OF GURNEY, YANKTON,

S.

D.

— 1925

19

Lettuce For very best results sow the lettuce in rows just as you always do, but when it is up and making the second set of leaves, transplant it to about four to six inches apart in the rows. Did you ever realize that when you sow lettuce so very thick in the row that you are getting very poor quality lettuce and only about one-tenth the quantity to the row that you should have? By transplanting, the plants will make immense, tender leaves, of good quality, and the headed varieties Will often head, making solid heads weighing one pound or morel (dive them plenty of room and they will well repay you for the little time and troujble you take ini transplanting. Try it out on n small scale anyway, and see if we are not right.

Gurney’s Crisp as Ice Very large, extremely crisp, hard-heading, and extra long-standing. Grows to a larger size, makes larger heads, is, of more pleasing appearance and retains its crispness and mild flavor to a greater degree during the hot summer months than any other crisp-head variety. While especially adapted for midsummer, it is most desirable also for spring and fall. The plants are of quick, strong growth, attaining a diarpeter of twelve inches with good cultivation. The leaves are of a soft bright green, growing closely around the head- The heads are tightly folded, six to eight inches ip diameter, bleached to a silvery white and nearly as crisp and brittle as eejery. Per pkt., 10c; oz., 25c; !4 lb*,

Gurney’s Stonehead Riviera This wonderful new* Lettuce is of French, origin and was introduced from Very hard-headed, and there' by us. the most long standing of all lettuces. Heads average size, closely folded, clear ieav.es interior color, green Unblanching to a creamy white. places or in planting for late equaled where it will be very hot and dry. Pkt., 10c | oz., 30c; V4 lb., $1.00; V2 lb., $1.90; 1 lb., $3.60,

light

Black Seeded Simpson

— A favorite forcing variety;

does not head, but, forms a compact mass of leaves, and differs in being lighter colored; stands the summer heat well, and is nearly double the size of the Curled Simpson. Pkt., 5c; oz., 20c; »/4 lb., 50c; ib., $1.50.

it



Grand Rapids This is beyond question the most popular of all forcing Lettuce. On account of its upright flabit of growth, it can be grown much closer than the other sorts, and it is less liable to rot; the leaves are light yellowish green, excellent for shipping, and keeps a long lb., 35c; time without wilting. Pkt., 5c; oz., 15c; 1 lb., 95c.

%

Royal White

Summer,

large, crisp, tender summer varieties. lb., $1.50.

and

of



or Drumhead Heads very good flavor, one of the best V4 lb., 50c;

Pkt., Sc; oz., 20c;



Prize Head An excellent variety for family use; forms a loose head of a dense mass of leaves, filled at the edge and densely blistered. Deep green in color, tinged with Pkt., 5c; oz., 20c; red; crisp, tender and good flavored. y4 lb., 45c; lb., $1.49.

BLACK SEEDED SIMPSON

lettuce as a standard food We

or less in the habit of thinking of lettuce as one of the early spring vegetables with a short two or three weeks’ season. It is a delicious and healthful vegetable and

are

more

may be had every day in the year, the entire grpwing season from your own garden and the balance of the year from your grocer. It is, prepared in many, ways, a delicious salad, cheaper than any other salad even when purchased from the store.

For your own garden plant both leaf and head lettuce, first planting in the hot bed or in a box in the house and transplant into the open as early as weather will permit. Sow more in the Leaf lettuee open at this transplanting time and again later. if not too thick may grow as you have sown it, but BE LETTUCE to be at its best to about ten inches apart in the row. It will then make desirable heads. Let’s have Lettuce all the time. £ ’

MUST

HEAD TRANSPLANTED .

-

..

„«sf?aCg\^7'

1866

20

— HOUSE

OF GURNEY, YANKTON,

NEW YORK WONDERFUL OR The production

market for everyday in the year is one of the big industries over the country, very profitable on account of its immense yield and big market.

Hanson

head lettuce

of

—A very

for the

heading variety of large size. The heads are very solid, sweet, tender and crisp throughout and A standard Summer Head entirely free from any bitter taste. Pkt., 5c; oz., 20c; x/\ lb., Lettuce, very slow to run to seed. fine

50c; 1 lb., $1.50.



Market Gardeners’ Private Stock A strain of blackseeded tennis ball selected with special care for hot-bed and It makes large, solid heads which stand cold frame culture. a long time before sending up seed shoots. Pkt., 5c; oz., i/ 20c; 4 6b., 45c; lb., $1.40. Big Boston A large heading, forcing sort, also for outdoor •winter culture. The plants are very hardy and vigorous, with broad, smooth, thin and hard leaves, light green in color, and when well grown are quite tender. Pkt., 5c; oz., 20c; Vi ib. 45c; lb., $1.40. California Cream Butter Splendid lettuce for the open ground, producing very large, solid heads in cool weather. This should be planted just as early as you can work the ground, as it does better than other varieties when weather is cool. This lettuce is largely planted in the Southern States Heads of for shipping to the Northern markets in winter. large size, very solid heads and the interior portion blanching The genuine stock of this popular lettuce to a beautiful white. can be distinguished by very small spots on the outer leaves. Pkt., 5c; oz., 20c; V4 ib., 45c; lb., $1.40. Brown Dutch Medium sized firm head, leaves broad and crumpled, color medium green tinged with brown. One of the best for late planting. Pkt., 5c; oz., 20c; 1/4 Ib., 50c; lb., $1.50.



D.

— 1925

LOS ANGELES

Head

lettuce produced from our seed near Omaha brought the grower nearly $ 2 000.00 per acre and it was not unusual to find six heads completely fill a standard bushel basket. ,

New York Wonderful



or Los Angeles This is the head grown in thousands of acres around Los Angeles, Idaho and other places, and shipped in carload lots all over the world. It is the standard head lettuce and best of any except Gurney’s Stonehead Riviera. Fkt., 10c; oz., lettuce

__

Calif., in

35c;

y4

Ib.,

80c; 1 Ib., $2.25; 5 lbs., $9.50.

— Sow August shallow inches apart, and thin to one foot Endive

in drills twelve to fifteen in in drills. When fully grown, over the outer leaves of a few' plants every week or ten blanch. Leaves curled, dark green. Pkt., 5c; oz., days to 20c; y4 Ib., 45c; Ib., $1.40. tie

Nels Q. Grefsheim, Steele County, N. D. Feb. 22, 1924. I regret that I have not WTitten thanking you for the premium seed packets sent me with my 1922 and 1923



order.

The Mammoth Pumpkin and New Globe Tomatoes wnre

A

slice of New Globe Tomato w as large enough splendid. to cover an ordinary dinner plate. The Walrath’s Golden Champlain Muskmelon simply cannot get enough praise

_

r

from me. I had a patch of.them last year and the ground was just covered with nice juicy melons. All the fruit trees and nursery stock ordered from you The 2,000 White Willow Cutin the past are doing fine. tings planted in 1922 are now' six to ten feet high. I am certainly well pleased with Gurney seeds and trees.



Melons

S.

—Musk

What’s the use of letting your boys steal the Melons they want from your neighbors? Why not plant them yourself and have company? Did you ever steal a watermelon? Crawl through the wet cornfield on your belly, about nine or ten o’clock at night, listening every minute for the watchdog, finally, reach the patch, and find one .of the largest and ripest ones right in the edge of the cornfield, pick.it carefully, roll it ahead of you until you are Vay back in the field, then pick it up and run, reach the edge of the field and then with your two or three companions, eat the, most delicious watermelon you ever had? Possibly those in your father’s patch w ere much better, but you wanted this melon because it was harder to get. I have stolen melons a good many times. As my hair commences to get gray, I don’t know that I approve of it, but boys will steal melons for the next twenty generations just as they have for the last, and when they go into the patch and take just what they want to eat, picking iand handling them y

carefully, not destroying the vines nor .spoiling melons, I think we can all forgive the crime just for the fun they get out of it. So plant enough for your boys and a few' for the neighbors.

W 1 IN IN JC.1XO All

from One Garden

— All from Gurney Seed

1

1866— HOUSE OF GURNEY,

i

YANKTON,

S.

D.— 1925

21



Hearts of Gold When the first fine was handed to me, the grow er said: “Peel it with your knife and eat it as you would an apple. It is solid meat clear through from r

fi;

rf



the thin skin clear to the heart.” I tried and it was a wonderfully delicious melon,

it :j

| | I

i

|i

I [j

I J

We

found absolutely the best second early. it again in the Nevadd deserts and carried a melon for three days, bumping around in the bottom of the car, then ate it and it was not -bruised- and was still delicious, This melon marketed in New York and in San Francisco at the height of the melon season, when the market was glutted with other Varieties, and sold at a very profitable price to the producer, the first car selling as high as $4.50 per crate against 75c for Hearts of Gold, like Golden Champlain, makes a heavy crown and ripens about one week later than Golden Champlain; shape, slightly oblong, well-netted; skin thin, meat thick and firm, quality delicious. No other melon equals standard varieties.

| | :

!

|i

set

One of the for shipping purposes. growers located on the Lincoln Highway in Nevada, told me that he sold his entire crop to tourists. They would stop and buy a

it

melon and invariably left orders for crates to be sent by parcel post or express to their friends in. the Last. expressed a crate across the United States and it reached destination in perfect condition. Market gardeners should plant heavily of this 40c; Pkt., 15c; variety. 1 oz., y4 lb.,

We

$1.10: y2 lb., $2.00; 513.00.

HEARTS OF GOLD —This photograph was made from a melon that was shipped

from Fallon, Nevada, to Yankton, from Yankton to Rochester, N. Y. and photoThe wonderful shipping graphed at that place, and still ip perfect condition melon.

Grand Muskmelon This splendid new melon is a sport from the Osage, which it resembles in quality, but differs somewhat in color and markings and is more uniform in size. It is at least ten days earlier than Osage, has a more vigorous vine, and because of its vigorous growth, a Color, a peculiar 'pea-green flesh, rich greater yielder. salmon or red color. In flavor it surpasses the best grown Osage or Emerald Gem. The flesh extends to the rind and retains the color and quality quite to the outer shell, which, though thin, is very hard and firm, and because of this bears shipment remarkably well. ;

The flesh is very thick, considering the size of the melon, leaving a small seed cavity. With repeated the Osage for the last five years, it has proven a more profitable melon for the market. - The bushel crates will weigh five pounds heavier than the Osage, which shows that it is a much thicker-meated melon. Pkt., 10c; oz., 20c; i/2 lb., $1.00; 1 lb., $1.55. trials beside

Gurney’s Enid Muskmelon Our

/ FROM f

THE

description

\\

\

Pkt., 10c; oz., 20c;

GRAND Netted

Gem—One

of the earliest

Oval in shape and very uniform flavor; exceedingly productive

$1.00; 5 lbs., $4.00.

and best small melons grown.

in size; flesh light

Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c;

green x

/4

and

of fine

lb., 30c;

lb.,

Postpaid.

Paul Rose or Petoskey



This widely advertised melon is a successful Osage with the Netted Gem and combines the sweetness of the former with the finely netted appearance of the Gem. The flesh is of orange red color like that of the Osage. A splendid shipper and just the right size for the hotel and table use. Large pkt., 5c; oz., 15c; i/4 lb., 35c; lb., $1.00; 5 lbs., $4.00. Postpaid. cross of the



Milwaukee Market A medium large, pink flesh melon with excelThe ribs are fairly prominent and the netting is heavy. The shape is slightly oval, early maturing and increasing in lent eating qualities.

This melon, on account of its earliness, quality and heavy planted liberally by market gardeners in the Northwest, who produce the greatest number of dollars per acre. For hojne use and for the regular market, especially in the North and West, this will be found one of the most profitable and satisfactory melons. Pkt., 10c; OZ., 15c; i/ lb., 70c; ib., $1.10; 5 lbs,, $4.50. Postpaid. 2 use each year.

bearing,

is

of

this

extremely. valuable •

new

melon when it was introduced by us in 1908: This new and valuable muskmelon originated in Enid, Oklahoma, and is certainly the best of all melons for home use or market gardeners. It is one-half larger than the Rocky Ford, one week earlier and twice as good. Color and shape the same as Rocky Ford, abundant bearer and an excellent market melon.

y4

|b., 50c; 1 lb., $1.50.

— 1866

— HOUSE

OF GURNEY, YANKTON,

D.

S.

— 1925

Honey Dew Muskmelon This melon is especially adapted to west of the Missouri River in South Dakota, Western and Northwestern Nebraska,; Colorado and Montana and Southwestern North Dakota. It produces exceptionally large crops of even sized high quality melons and brings more money per acre than any crop you could grow. Honey Dew melons sell at an extremely high price, retailing often at from 60c to $2.00 each, and people located in the places named above, will. do well to plant sufficient quantity of Honey Dew for their local as well as their shipping market, as they will bring exceptionally high prices in October, November and December. The Honey Dew is in a class by itself, being different from any other melon. The flesh is very thick and. firm, emerald green in color, spicy and of a flavor that you do not get in any other melon.

Honey Dew

— “Some better than the very

best, -a whole lot better might stop right there with our description It is a wonderful production, a Casaba and the Rocky Ford' Cantaloupe. We few words of its value on the- market. I have taken from the Daily Chicago Trade Bulletin the market -on various melons at different times, and without, exception, the Honey Dew was. selling at from fifty cents to one dollar and fifty cents per crate more than any other melon on the market. You can eat it in September or keep it until Christmas, it' simply gets better all the time.

than

all

the rest.”

We

Dew Muskmelon.

of the Honey cross' of an African want to say just a

TIP TOP



Winter Muskmelon On the they are grown by the trainload, of a pleasant golden color, at least three inches thick and has that delicious flavor of the “Hearts of Gold” summer melon. The Persian is a large finely netted dark green melon weighing about 10 pounds. Keeps equal to the Honey Dew. This is the great Christmas melon. Pkt:,, 15c; oz., Persian

•west coast

the meat

y4

40c;

is

lb., $1.25.



Pollock No. 10-25 Salmon Pink In twenty years there has been a number of improvements in the Netted Gem or the Rocky Ford Cantaloupe and the 10-25 Salmon Pink is the latest, yielding heavily, even sized melons, so that after picking there is hardly a cull left in the field, netting a little more heavily from stem to blossom, rust resistant, a few days earlier, and reach the market in such condition that they are worth the money asked. It is a re-selection of Pollock’s No. 25. Price Pkg.. 10c; oz.,



20c; i/4 lb., 60c; 5 lbs., $7.00.

Rffirs.

V2

lb., $1.00;

1 lb., $1.75;

Axel Carlson,

Grand Forks County, N.

D.

/ f

planted your Cole’s Early Watermelon seed last Spring and I have the best melons in this whole country. They weighed up to twenty-four pounds and were of fine quality. I

!

F30M the

V \

HOUSE "SURXEY

;

I like

your seed better than any other.

Emerald

HONEY DEW

Gem — I

asked the gardener at the Hospital for the Insane to name the muskmelon that he thought the most of, the one that produced the best percentage of strictly good melons of the right size. Without hesitation he said Emerald Gem. For the big institution he grows several acres, and I noticed a larger percentage of Emerald Gem than any other variety; they are nearly smooth skinned, deeply ribbed green rind, with just a few lighter colored stripes, flesh thick so that the seed cavity is not much larger than a walnut. Flesh of a delicate salmon color, and it would be useless for me to tell you much of their quality because you might think I was Pkt., 5e; oz., 10c; prejudiced. $5.00, postpaid.

W. I

S. Lee,

Wayne,

III.

am sending you a snapmy Gurney’s Earli-

shot of

and Sweetest Watermelon, just as they grew in the field. We had an unest

usually early frost, and

had the only

I

ripe watermelons in this vicinity. Everyone who saw them said they were the most wonderful lot of melons they had ever In many places as seen. many as a dozen lay in a space eight feet square. I sold more than a thousand of the largest and they had been marketed when the pictures were taken.

J/

,u

«

c

Green Fleshed Honey Dew 70c; 4 oz., 85c;

V2

— Pkt.,

10c; oz., 40c; 2 oz.,

lb., $1.20; 1 lb., $1.75.

Golden Fleshed Honey Dew In every respect the same as the Green Fleshed Honey Dew, except the flesh is a rich golden color. Price Pkt. 15c; oz., 35c; 2 oz., 60c; 4 oz., 80c; y2 lb., 51.20; 1 lb.. 51.75.



f

1866 Giant of Colorado

— HOUSE

— Large

size;

OF GURNEY, YANKTON,

S.

D.

— 1925

23

oblong; 12 to 15 inches

Skin green, flesh in length, heavily ribbed and netted. Best quality of any of light green and excellent quality. the large melons. This is a very satisfactory melon for the home garden

md home market. The melon is very large and attractive and brings a good price always, but not a good shipping melon. We have picked as high as six ripe melons at one time from a single vine, none of them weighing less than Pkt., 5c; 02 ., 10c; lb., $1.20; 5 lbs., $5.00, 7 lbs postpaid. Tip Top This wonderfully fine melon should be It always pleases. planted by all melon growers. The testimony of all who use Tip Top is that every melon produced, whether big or little, early or late, is a good one; sweet, juicy, finest flavor, firm-fleshed and eatable Its appearance on the market is to the outside coating. very attractive sells on sight. The fruits are of large size, nearly round, evenly ribbed and moderately netted. Flesh rich deep salmon, sweet and spicy. Ripe fruits in 90 days. Pkt., 5c; oz. r 15c; y4 lb., 45c; lb., $1.50, postpaid. Rocky Ford This variety is an improvement on the Netted Gem, and is largely grown in Colorado and shipped by the carload to the eastern cities. It is much sought after by hotel and restaurant keepers on account of its size and exceptionally fine flavor. Flesh is greenish white in color, very juicy and rich and good clear to the rind. It is medium in size, of round oval form and a most excellent keeper. Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; Vi lb., 30c; lb., $1.00;







5 lbs., $4.00,

GIANT OF COLORADO Hoodoo ful



Another of Paul Rose’s wondermelons introduced three years ago, has

grown into popular favqr pipre rapidly than any other melon. The Hoodoo melon is equal in quality to any melon planted today, and for all purposes it is better than nearly

postpaid.

The color of the flesh is bright orange, meat very thick, seed cavity extremely small, netting is very close and firm, making it one of the very best for shipping. Our seed of this variety is saved from a most carefully selected, inspected field, and is two years ahead in selection of any other seed offered. Pkt., 10c; oz., 15c; Vi lb., 35c; lb., $1.15; 5 lbs., $4.50, postpaid. all others.

Banana

—A peculiar, long, smooth yellow-

skinned melon with salmon flesh. Pkt., 5c; 1 oz., 10c; i/4 lb., 35c; 1 lb., $1.25, postpaid.

Hammer, Brule County, S. Dak. IVIar. 3, 1924. Please send me your catalog as I wish

Ivan

to purchase more trees and seeds. Two years ago I was at Brule, Nebraska, where I purchased trees and seeds from you and was more than pleased with them. Every tree that I got from you certainly did fine and I know that I will have good success again.





Osage (Miller’s Cream) This is the most profitable of all melons for the market gardener; uniform quality; it makes no difference what the size of the melons may be, they are all sweet and delicious. The skin is thin, dark green and netted. _

The flesh is deep salmon, remarkably sweet and of a spicy flavor; extremely thick and delicious to the rind. Pkt., Sc; oz», 10c; Vi lb., 35c; lb., $1.00; 5 lbs., $4.70, postpaid.

Home Sweet Home—This is a very fine market or family melon. As shown in the illustration, it oblong in shape, very beautifully netted, thick green flesh, and of delicious flavor. The melons run medium to large in size and exceedingly uniis

form, and a basket of them makes a very handsome appearance in market. Pkt., 10c; oz., 15c; Vi lb., 45c; lb., $1.25; 5 lbs., $5.00, postpaid.



Davis’ White Seed We listed this melon in 1911 for the time and recommended it highly on account of the good showing it had made in our trial grounds in comparison with other melons. Last season we said this was the best quality of any of the muskmelons yet introduced, and one more year’s general trial over the country has convinced us that it is the best all-round home and shipping melon yet introduced. This

first

the only white-seed muskmelon, as all other muskmelons produce a yellow seed only. A report from one of our growers in western Nebraska tells us that the White Seeded was the earliest muskmelon of any that he planted this past season, coming in two weeks ahead of the Osage, and produced more melons to the vine that were marketable than any other melon he has ever grown, and the quality was all good. In most melons you will find sometime during the season lots of melons of poor quality; with the Davis White Seeded they are all alike, both for size, color, quality, and the inimense number borne on each vine. We can only offer a limited is

amount $2.50.

of the seed.

Pkt., 10c; oz., 25c; Vi lb., 80c; 1 lb.,

County, Iowa. Dec. 22, 1924. have always thought that excellent service of any kind should be acknowledged and appreciated. In this connection, I wish to say that I have had splendid results from nursery stock purchased from you. In 1919 1 purchased a number of the Prof. Hansen Hybrid Plums. They are one of the finest things in the fruit line that I have ever come across. I have the Hanska, Kaga, Opata, Sapa, Ezaptan and Waneta. Those of the Sand Cherry blood, I consider the most meritorious production of Horticulture in the present century, the finest for canning I have ever tasted, the flavor is equal to the finest champagne, and when the trees are in bloom, the flowers are in clusters entirely covering the branches; later they are a solid mass of fruit. The fruit is different from the ordinary American plums and the fact that they have been free from curculio and blight. E. C. Willis, Scott I

1866

24

— HOUSE

OF GURNEY, YANKTON,

S.

D.— 1925

Walrath’s Golden Champlain Muskmelon (See colored plate, page 67) Ten reasons for offering this new melon: 1st. Ripens three weeks in advance of the Hackensack, Emerald Gem or Paul Rose. 2nd. It blossoms and sets fruit thickly on laterals before the vines are By doing this it produces from eight to fifteen 3rd. six inches long. large melons in a cluster around the hill which makes them easy to



Because of this unusual habit the first setting of melons 4th. matures at the same time. 5th. The vines are very hardy, strong growing, which enables it to handle an immense crop. 6th. Because 7th. Its desirable of its high qualitv, golden yellow meated fruit. to 3 y2 lbs. 8th. Because it is the best market size, varying from 2 On account 9th. originator. the tried by kinds of thirty-four different of its earliness it grabs off the early melon money which is always the the has extended that melon the it is Because 10th. best money. melon belt hundreds of miles north, allowing people clear to the Canadian description from the I quote muskmelon. delicious line to enjoy this given by the originator: “In introducing to you our New Habit CantaThis melon is so early that it can loupe, GOLDEN CHAMPLAIN. be grown much farther north than any other variety yet introduced. than the Emerald Gem, Hackensack or earlier weeks It ripens three Paul Rose. The nature of the New Habit is that it throws laterals and are six inches long, and real fruit sets stems main the blossoms before You will find from eight to on these laterals and develop rapidly. the hill where the seed were around right bunch in a fifteen large melons This planted, making easy and inexpensive handling when ripening. the same time, mature at the starting at account first setting of melons same time, giving a large crop and the early money getter. The vines handle.

%

are exceptionally strong and hardy. Quality of fruit excellent, flesh golden yellow. Outside skin green, well netted, and firm. Size from 2 Yi to 3 Vi lbs. I have grown thirty-four different kinds of cantaloupe in the last fifteen years, but the Golden Champlain yields much heavier than any of them even if you only count the first setting. Three years out of four we have picked ripe melons fifty-seven days after planting seeds in the fields, with ordinary field culture. This melon is successfully grown in the Lake Champlain district in high altitude, henee its name, GOLDEN CHAMPLAIN. Its extreme earliness prevents a lot of melon money from getting into the pockets of the Imperial Valley growers, and gives it to the home producer three weeks sooner.”

HOME SWEET HOME

From Wilburt

Harrison, Kingsville, O., 11-19-21. I received more money from one acre of Golden Champlain muskmelon than from two and one-half acres of any other varieties. Successful melon growers, if they kinew gJSF*" Golden Champlain Melon of the many qualities of this melon, maturing as it does twenty days earlier than others, maturing in 57 days from seed to market, netting 82,000.00 per acre, they would not hesitate to pay §20.00. per acre for the seed, about the cost of potato seed per acre, while their profits would be at least five to ten times as much. Pkt., 15c; V2 oz., 30c; oz., 50c; 1/4 lb., $1.50; I lb., $5.00. Extra Early Hackensack This valuable variety is ready for the market fully ten days ahead of the well-known Hackensack, which it much resembles in size, shape and quality; weight from five to ten pounds each; very productive, averaging from five to six melons to the vine; 30c; lb., deeply netted; flesh fight, green. Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; $1.00; 5 lbs., $4.00, postpaid.





%

Citron They are used for making preserves, and I guess every housewife knows of numerous other ways to use them. They are a very valuable vegetable.

y4

Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c;

lb.,

25c; lb., 90c; 5 lbs., $4.00, postpaid.

Vine Peach or Garden

Lemon

sometimes known as Vegetable Orange; entirely different from the cucumber, known as

Cucumber Lemon. The vine on which this fruit is borne is similar to the muskmelon and same cultivation; fruit about the size of a large peach, oval shaped, somewhat russeted and the color of a bright orange when ready for use. For sweet pickles, pies and preserves, they are excellent. Pkt., requires the

10c; oz., 35c;

% lb.,

75c.

Mr. and Mrs. Chas.

We

F.

Ziemann, Stanley County,

S. D.

May

10, 1924.

do appreciate your methods of doing business. Received the new package of trees in fine condition and if they do not will be our fault. certainly grow, it We wish to thank you for the free bulbs of the Blackberry Lily, sent. which you certainly

HACKENSACK Special List of Profitable This

Melons

selected to cover, as nearly as possible, yield, season, quality and ability to stand shipping or rough usage.

for

Muskmelons

—First early, good quality, fruit from the Hearts of Gold — Ripens

Walrath’s Golden Champlain high yielding muskmelon. Sets its blossoms, insuring early ripening.

first

first

immediately after Golden Champlain, the highest quality, best shipping muskmelon produced; nearly solid meat, and of such quality that one remembers it selling from the market gardener’s load or in terminal markets at double the price of other melons. Honey Dew No other melon in this class. Western Nebraska Melon Growers’ Association received an average of 42c each for all of their Honey Dews this past year. Especially profitable in western South Dakota, western Nebraska and



Cojiofiaclp..



±

;

Market Gardeners Watermelons

list is

Gurney’s Earliest and Sweetest—Just as early as the Cole’s Early, better quality, average five pounds heavier, stands shipping better. Follow this with Round Light Icing, an especially valuable melon for the Northwest, good size and quality, and good carload shipper. Kleckley’s Sweet Follows Round Light Icing; very dark green flesh, high quality, heavy yielding, good shipping melon. Produces a large percentage of melons weighing from 25 to 50



pounds.



Corporal Gurney Absolutely the best quality melon proFollows Kleckley’s Sweet in season of ripening; duced. extremely thin rind, but so tough and strong that a 200-pound man can stand on it without breaking. When Corporal Gurney ripens, you can sell no other melon. This fist of melons does not mean that other varieties are worthless, but these are especially good for a person who grows melons to sell. I shall be glad to have you write for the best list of melons for the home or commercial garden in your particular locality, where you feel that the above list does not apply.

1866

— HOUSE

OF GURNEY, YANKTON,

The New Watermelon We offered this four years ago and, with the exception of a very few reports, it has proven one of the very best melons Its large size, extremely tough rind and of the entire list. excellent quality has made it a desirable market melon. We

‘‘Corporal

S.

D.

— 1925

25

Gurney”

are offering it again with the assurance that this is the coming melon for the market, at least for that part of the country where they are grown in large quantities for the market,

We have called this “Corporal Gurney” because the first ripe melon was picked on the day he was appointed corporal. Since then he has become sergeant, but the melon remains “Corporal,” although it is absolutely “General” in

quality.

It

oblong melon,

is

an

shorter

and much thicker through than the

Tom

Watson and Kleckley. In color it is a very pleasing gray, or a very light green. The rind is extremely hard, making it best of all melons for shipping purposes. It can be shipped across the United States and back again, and be equal to any freshly picked The quality melon. never has been surpassed, and probably

never will be. The rind thin, but strong is

enough so that the

man can stand without injuring

heaviest

on

it

have rolled these melons off from an orit.

I

dinary table to the floor without cracking the rind or bruising the flesh. I am not showing you a picture of Corporal Gurney, but a picture of This melon is not as early as the earliest, the melon instead. but will be classed as a medium eaily melon. Our supply of seed is limited and consequently rather high-priced this season,

but for satisfaction you had better plant one packet of Corporal Gurney than a dozen packets of other varieties. Price per wall-filled packet, 15c; 1 oz., 30c; $1.00; 1 lb., $1.50; 5 lbs., $6.00.

Winter Watermelon (See colored Yankton, S. D., has the best equipped State Hospital, takes better care of its patients, and cures more than any other in the United States. This is a broad statement, but I believe It is equipped with theatre, dance hall, ball ground, it is true. tennis court, and last, but not least, an immense automobile, carrying thirty passengers, and on every decent day, during the entire year, it is loaded with patients early in the morning, a fifteen mile ride given them, the car then returns to the Hospital ahd is reloaded, and this operation continues until nightfall. You wonder what this has to do with winter waterI have been on the melons. I am just coming to that. grounds of the Hospital for the Insane at Yankton this summer a number of times, and it was not unusual to see hundreds of the patients on these beautiful grounds among the trees and on the lawn, each patient, if they wanted it, eating watermelon. Their garden covers about thirty acres, all grown

plate,

Page

V

4

ib.,

75c;

i/ 2

lb.,

34.)

seeds, and they had thousands of the winter watermelons, besides thousands of other kinds. On this date, November 1st, they still have a quantity of the winter watermelons stored. It is the sweetest and best of all. You can almost taste the deliciousness of this wonderfully sweet melon hidden in its luxuriant foliage. It is not only good at time of maturity of the ordinary melon, but can be harvested and kept well up to Christmas time. It is medium-sized, almost clear white rind, the brightest red flesh and small black seeds, very firm and very tough rind, which accounts for its keeping qualities. These' should be harvested when ripe, not overripe, placed in a cool dry cellar; or if you wish, place them in the open in straw, seeing that the melons do not touch each other and covering all of them with sufficient straw to keep from freezing. Take them out as wanted and you will be well repaid. Price, pkt., 10c; oz., 25c; y4 lb., 60c; 1 lb., $2.00.

from Gurney’s



Round Light Icing Fruit medium sized, nearly round, greenish white, slightly veined or dotted with. light green. The flesh is light red, sweet and crisp, seed white. A very early melon producing remarkable

crops.

Late

in

May in the spring of 1921, we had a telephone order from one of our customers for more than 100 pounds of this seed. I advised that it was too late to plant any watermelon, but he insisted on planting and I recommended some earlier varieties; but he still insisted on Round Light Icing, and he marketed from that field dozens of carloads about as early as the earliest varieties, and received top prices for them. Price Pkg., 5c; oz., 10c; y4 lb., 25c; y2 ib., 50c; 1 lb., 90c; 5 lbs., $3.00. The Florida Favorite White seeded, rind light green, with model stripes of dark green, shape long and the melons average about twenty-five pounds in weight. It is not a good .long distance shipping melon, but, is very excellent for home trade on account of its excellent quality and it has become very popular where grown. I advise all growing melons for their own use or for the home market to plant liberally of this variety. Medium early, which insures satisfaction for the home use and profit for





the market gardener. 'This has become a very popular melon in the last three years, where lots of them are marketed each day, with satisfactory results to the consumer, as well as to the grower. Pkt., 5c; &z., 10c; y4 ib., a§c; y2 ib., 59e; t ib., 93c; 5 ib*.,

around Yankton

ROUND LIGHT ICING

YANKTON,

1866— HOUSE OF GURNEY,

26

S.

D.

— 1925



Georgia Rattlesnake One of the oldest Southern varieties, very large, long, light green in color with mottled stripe of a darker shade. Flesh tender and sweet. Plant this variety as early as possible so that it may have the delicious flavor that has made it famous in the South. Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; Vi ih., 25c; V2 lb,, 50c; 1 lb., 90c; 5 lbs., S3.00.



Kleckley’s Sweet Vines are producing uniformly large-sized melons. The

strong-growing, fruits are

let

The

oblong.

dark green.

Flesh

and ripens

is

skin

is

bright scar-

to within one-half

of the rind.

The

quality

is

very rich and sweet, hence its name. For the home market or family garden it is decidedly one of the best.

Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c;

25c; lb., 80c; 5

Vi lb., 53.00.

lbs.,

H. M. Brabham, Custer County, Nebr. Sept. 4, 1924. I

am

of the

enclosing a snapshot

Yankton Main Crop

Peas, which I purchased from you. our seeds are the very best that money can buy.

Y

KLECKLEY’S SWEET The above photo is of Charles and a Kleckley The kid married October, 1921. Can you

Sweet. beat it?

Tom Watson — It

is

not often

that a melon will jump from the unknown to the most popular melon grown in a short period of four or five seasons. The Tom Watson is a melon of that type; it is one of the very best shippers of the long melons, and one of the best quality. The melons will grow to a length of

about two

FROM

feet,

and about one

foot in diameter. The rind is a hard mottled green, thin, but tough enough to endure shipping Of the to any distant markdt. long shaped melons it is the best shipper of any. The flesh is deep red and comes very close to the rind. e consider this for quality equal to any of the melons, and it sells readily on the market when there is no demand for Pkg., 5c; oz., 10c; others. lb., 25c; lb., 70c; 5 lbs., 1/4 $2.75.

W

TOM WATSON Peerless

— (Ice

Cream)



of

medium

size,

flesh bright scarlet, solid to the center, and 10c; 1/4 lb., 25c; lb., 70c; 5 lbs., $2.75.

thin rind, light mottled green; Pkt., 5c; oz.,

sweet as honev.



Fordhook Early Without a rival. This is the earliest large-fruited melon in cultivation. We secured a good number of fine large melons before any other varieties ripened, with the exception only of the small Cole’s Early. These fruits are of good size, rather short and blocky in form, with large diameter; skin dark green, occasionally with faint stripes of lighter green; flesh bright red, crisp, sweet, and of splendid quality rind quite thin, but skin tough; make an excellent shipping variety. Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; ;

1/4

lb.,

25c; lb., 80c; 5 lbs., $3.00.

Gem —

Kolb’s A valuable variety. The fruit is large, weighing from 25 to 50 lbs. It has a delicious flavor, and its keeping qualities are the best. Pkt., 5c; oz., 10 c; Vi lb., 2 Gc; Bb., 60c; 5 lbs., by express, $2.40.



Mclver’s or Wonderful Sugar Oblong in shape; size uniformly large; handsome appearance; skin shows broad bands of white, shading into narrower bands of dark green; quality is superior; flesh is soft pale pink, crisp, free from any stringiness, and juicy. The melons have a solid heart, free from cracks, while the seed rows are close to the rim. Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; 1/4

lb.,

25c; lb., 65c.

Phinney’s Early

—An

early variety; medium and uniform size, and a skin is smooth, with white mottled and dark green stripes. Flesh light red or pink, sweet and delicious. One of the best for home use. Pkt., 5c; oz., 10 c; Vi lb., 20 c; lb., 65c. beautiful form.

The

Mueller, Turner County, S. D. I am enclosing a snapshot of myself with a big Tom Watson Watermelon which weighs sixty-two pounds. 1 raised this on my Father’s farm South of J. A.

Davis and from Gurney seeds. 1 planted Gurney seeds for years on a twenty acre melon patch and also garden. seeds cannot be beat. I will not plant any other.

The

1866— HOUSE OF GURNEY, YANKTON,

jm'~'

!

S.

D.— 1925

27

..T.VV

Gurney’s Improved Cole’s Early Watermelon Gurney’s Improved Cole’s Early Water'



melon This is an improvement over th e old COLE’S EARLY. By selection it ha* "been made more uniform in size, bette 1 quality and earlier. Sure to ripen. Just the '

Ripens during melon for home market. August and by far the best watermelon for the northern states, where the seasons are usually too short for any other. Since its introduction melons have ripened further north than it was supposed possible is no less to ripen them. COLE’S valuable for the middle states from the fact, that it ripens melons ahead of any other and continues to bear abundantly throughout the entire season. Weight about 10 to 15 lbs., nearly round, dark green with lighter stripes, flesh brightest red, crisp and. free from

EARLY

Very solid. Is deliciously sweet and refreshing all the way through to the stringiness.

Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; V\ lb., 25c; 1 lb., 70c; 5 lbs., $2.65. rind.

The

EARLIEST AND SWEETEST

Earliest

three to five pound's heavier, does not break as easily when handled, and the facts are that when the two melons ripening together are placed before you, you will always eat the earliest and sweetest. The average

H8USE«GWNEY

weight of this melon would be probably from 12 to 15 lbs., flesh scarlet, very fine grained, and the flavor is delicious. The seeds are white. Vines producing wonderful crops, often, producing eight to twelve melons to the vine. We wish to say to our Northern customers that this earliest and sweetest melon is the one they should plant. There is but little use in planting the large late varieties in your locality. They are only a disappointment; nearly ripe when the frost comes. You will always get under the wire Pkt., with the Earliest and the Sweetest. 16c; oz., 26c; >/4 lb., 56c; lb., $1.50.

Sweetheart

—Our

field

watermelons

of

A

field of 30 was certainly a pleasant sight. acres of these planted right and growing right was so well covered w'ith melons that a person could have started in any part of the field and walked around all over it and stepped on a large melon each time. Every melon seemed to be perfect in color and shape. This is certainly a fine strain of this very

popular shipping melon. Rind is thin, but firm. Flesh bright red, very sweet and Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; tender, size large. ib., 20c; lb., 65c; 5 lbs., $2.75.

Golden Sweet

—The only desirable yellow

meated melon, and for home use the best, of melons. Very thin rind, golden yellow flesh, so remarkably sweet and tender that they will be chosen above all other melons Price— for home, not shipping purposes. all

Pkt., 10c; oz., 15c; Vi ib., 40c; lb., $1.30.

% ib., 70c|

and Sweetest

Almost as far back as I can remember we have urged everyone to plant the Cole’s Early, for the earliest and best watermelons. We have not changed our minds a particle about the Cole’s Early, as it is still one of the very best, but the earliest and sweetest, a cross of Mountain Sweet and Cole’s Early, Combining the best qualities of both, is nearly one week earlier than Cole’s Early,

MY TWO SWEETHEARTS

1866— HOUSE OF GURNEY,

28

YANKTON,

S.

D.— 1925

A FIELD OF IDAHO ONIONS— 387 BU. FROM An Onion

Bulletin with

Each

V4

i/j-ACRE lbJor Larger Order.

As Onions are one of the most profitable crops grown, often producing several hundred dollars net be well for you to plant liberally of them and share in this immense growing profit.

profit per acre, it

would

may grow

equally as successful as the expert or continuous grower, we will enclose with each order of onefourth pound and up, our Onion Bulletin, giving complete instructions for preparing the seed bed, planting, growing, harvesting and marketing. I want to call your special attention to Gurney Red Globe, as pictured on Page 34, of this catalog.

In order that you

ONION CULTURE AND PROFIT IN ONIONS You cannot plant a crop on your farm that will produce more dollars per acre than a crop of onions. The yield in the northwest from the onion Dakota and Southport Red Globe and other standard varieties is always exceptionally heavy; the gardeners selling but few of them under $1.25 per bu., and lots of them moving at $1.50 and $2.00 per bu., making the greatest yield of dollars per acre of any crop. Onions can be grown and harvested for $45.00 per acre; this allows about $8.00 per acre rent for the land. A very ordinary yield would be at least 300 bushels per acre, even this small crop would bring more net dollars per acre than any five acres in an ordinary crop. Yields of one thousand bushels are not uncommon and one of our friends at Bassett, Nebraska, has just sent us a photograph of his field of one and one-fourth acres from which he harvested nine hundred bushels. The varieties he planted were Gurney’s Red Globe “Dakota” and Southport Yellow Globe. Figure the cost of production as high as you please and you could not come within a mile of the gross profit, plant just as many as you can take care of, you cannot flood the market. In previous years we have devoted several pages to onion culture and profits in onions. Owing to the fact that we have reduced the size of the catalog this year we are compelled to leave out of the regular catalog all of this matter, but instead will pack with each order of onefourth pound or more an onion bulletin, giving you full instructions We shall be glad for the cultivation, care and marketing of onions. to send copies of these or other bulletins on request at any time.



Australian Brown An early onion of medium size and nearly The skin is a bright globular shape; a sure cropper and long keeper. brown, and the flesh is white, crisp, extremely solid, and of a sweet, mild flavor. This is the longest keeper and the best onion to plant for early market when prices are high a very beautiful onion. Pkb, Sc; oz., 20c; y4 lb. f 35c; 1 lb., $1.35; 5 Ebs., $5.25. Postpaid.



GURNEY’S DAKOTA RED GLOBE



Extra Early Red Flat For the early market we advise this onion, It is not as it matures two to three weeks earlier than other onions. quite so large, medium size, flat in form, flesh white tinged with pink, skin deep red, solid, good keeper. Pkg., 5c; oz., 25c; Sb., 70c; 1 lb., $1.75.

See Colored Plate Page 34

%

In offering the “Dakota” Onion we wish to tell you something of it. The parentage of this onion is strictly Southport Red Globe, but has been grown in Dakota for a number of years and by careful selection of the bulbs and saving of the seed crop we have produced an onion that is very uniform in size, very dark red in color, a perfect globe, and quite a bit earlier than any other globe onion that we know of. consider ;his one of the most profitable onions for the people of the Northwest to plant. It has yielded an immense crop of On account firm bulbs when other seed has failed to do as well. of being able to market them earlier than other varieties you can secure a better price, and as the yield is equally as large as any other variety it is certainly more profitable to plant them. The seed will edit you a little more money than the others, but a few cents per acre is more than made up by the Pkg., 10c; oz., 35c; Vi lb., $1.00; V2 lb., results in the fall. $1.50; 1 lb., $2.50; 5 lbs., $10.00. Postpaid.

We

Mammoth



Silver King This is absolutely the largest uch as 20 white onion grown, spe cimens often measuri ng. as

m

inches in circumference and weighing as’high as four pounds. It is of very attractive shape and color; silvery white skin, flesh a most agreeable flavor, but only a reasonable keeper. advise the growing of this in small quantities, and you should dispose of them by the first of December. For exhibition purposes these should be started in a hotbed and transplanted; in this way you will produce onions of immense size. Pkg., lb., 80c; 1 lb., $2.75. 10c; oz., 30c;

We

%

From Guy G.

Frary, State

Food and Drug Commis-

sioner, Vermillion, S. D. I am sure you will be interested in a comment made in a letter I have just received from the Deputy Secretary of Agriculture of the State of Nebraska, Mr. Grant Shumway. He makes this comment upon your splendid nursery: “I think you have a wonderful nursery at Yankton. One of the best of the entire West to my knowledge.” '

1866

— HOUSE

OF GURNEY, YANKTON,

D.— 192$

S.

29



White Welch Onions For early green onions, the seed of this onion may be treated as any onion seed, making one-third the expense and trouble of planting top sets and producing more green onions. The flavor is the sweetest of all onions. The plant is perennial and may be left in the ground for years with but slight protection. Maximum results, however, are obtained by treating as an annual; sow in the spring or fall. Pkg,, 10c; ©z., 35c; Vi lb., $1.00.

OR

SMALL SILVER-SKIN -This is used for pickling PARIS WHITE PICKLING, purposes almost entirely; it is of small size, silvery white and makes the best onion for its purpose. In planting onions for pickling or for sets, seed should be sown at the rate of about lb., $1.00; 1 lb., $3.25. 40 lbs. per acre. Pkg., 5c; oz., 35c;

%

\rfi

White Portugal

nOfUEAL

iHUl



Is

very good sized, half globe, pure silvery white, an excellent keeper, and yields heavily. This is the best of all onions for the production of sets or small pickling onions. For sets or pickles sow at regular time very thick at least



ten times the amount you

would

sow

for

larger

onions.

Pkt., 10c; oz., 30c; i/4 lb., $1.00; lb., $2.50.

Large Red Wethersfield



One

of the old

standard varieties and a favorite onion especially in the West, where im-

WHTT1?

w

wnij.11 mense crops are grown for shipment. Large size, skin deep purplish red, form round, somewhat flat, flesh purplish white, moderately fine grained, and stronger in flavor than most other kinds. Very productive, best keeper, and very popular for general cultivamost localities. It is more inclined to form large if planted on very rich soil, but it is the best of any Pkg., 5c; oz., 25c; lb., variety on poor or dry soil. 70c; 1 lb., $1.60; 4 lbs., $6.00. Postpaid. tion in

necks

%

Southport Red Globe

—We

consider this the most profitable of the onions for planting in the north. Brings the best price on the market of any of the red onions. Its large size, dark, glossy red color and the fact that it is one They are just of the best keepers makes it very desirable. a little later in maturing than the Red Flat, but are safe to would plant almost any place that onions can be grown. advise that you make the bulk of your planting Southport Red Globes. This variety has given as high as 1,100 bushels per acre, and is the leading market variety In the north. lb., 89c; 1 lb., $2.00; 4 lbs., $7.50. Pkg., 5c; oz., 25c;

We

%

Postpaid.

Southport Yellow Globe

—The

true Southport Yellow Globe is particularly valuable for winter market. It is a more perfect globe than the Yellow Globe Danvers and a better keeper. The onions are similar in size and form to the Southport Red Globe, but have a pale, straw yellow skin, mild flavor and a heavy cropper. Owing to its handsome appearance and delightful flavor it sells readily on all markets. would advise that you plant a part of your acreage to these. Pkg., 5c; oz., 25c; y4 lb., 70c; 1 lb., $1.60; 4 lbs., $6.00. Postpaid.

We



Southport Large White Globe This is the best all-purpose white onion in cultivation it is large, a perfect globe, silvery white and the very best keeper, and excellent quality. It commands in a small way a higher price on the market than the Yellow’ or Red onion, but the demand is not as large for the White. In growing onions we advise that you put in a part of your acreage of this large White Globe, as there is always a demand for a reasonable amount of them at a better price than you could get for other onions. On account of their mild flavor they are particularly valuable for green onions for bunches. Pkg., 5c; oz., 30c; lb., 80c; 1 lb., $2.25; 5 lbs., $9.00. Postpaid. ;

%



Prizetaker This is the largest of all onions and most handsome, the mildest in flavor not excepting the Bermuda onions. Our seed stock of this onion is pure American grown and pi oduces the largest and handsomest onion we have ever seen large in size and better in appearance than the most wonderful of the Spanish and Italian varieties, many of the bulbs weighing as high as 3 and 3 l lbs. each. Skin rich golden color, and so mild and sweet that it can be eaten raw like an apple. This variety has been on sale in the grocery stores over the country and usually retails at from 5 to 8 cents per lb. This onion is a reasonably good keeper, but should be disposed of by January 1st. We strongly urge the planting of a reasonable acreage of this variety, as it will certainly prove profitable. Pkg., 5c; oz., 25c; y4 lb., 89c; lb., $2.00, ;

A

T

Leek London Flag— Sow early in and one foot apart. When six

the spring in drills one inch deep or eight inches high transplant in

rows 13 inches apart and 5 inches between the plants as deep as possible, that the neck may be blanched. One oz. to 150 feet drilled. Pkt., 10c; oz., 20c;

1/4

lb,, 80c; lb., $2.95,

Mrs. Dr. Starkey, Hall County, Nebr. Apr. 21, 1924. The potatoes, trees and shrubs came in good condition and are

all

planted.

The Compass Cherry and Wanet a plums bought from you two years

ago, bore fruit last year.

Everything satisfactory.

PRIZETAKER

I

have purchased from you

is

growing and proving



.

YANKTON,

1866— HOUSE OF GURNEY,

30

S.

D.— 1925 Onion Sets may be planted early in the spring to be used for green onions, or ean be allowed to grow, producing large onions very early. They are planted largely by market gardeners arid allowed to grow full size on account of coming into the market when 'other onions are scarce in this way they realize the best price. 32 lbs. per bu. White Bottom Sets—1 Sb., 30c; pk., $1.75; bu., $5,00; 100 These

.

;

lbs,, $14.08.



Red Bottom Sets Lb., 25c; pk., $1.50; bu., $4.25; 100 lbs., $12.25.



Yellow Bottom Sets 1 lb., 25c; pk., $1.50; 1 bu., $4.25; 100 Ibs„ $12.25. Multipliers



Lb., oroductive. $2.09; bu., $6.00.

Potato

Orsions



Evergreen Top or Winter Onions These are to be planted from the 1st Shipment will be made as soon as of September until it freezes in the fall. the sets are ripe, the latter part of August and September. Price V2 8b., 15c; 1 lb., 25c; 5 lbs., S1.00.

Mushrooms These delicious fungi can be grown in a warm cellar or close shed, in which an even temperature can be maintained of from 50 to 60 degrees, and where a plentiful supply of fresh horse-stable manure for making the beds can be Our spawn is imported from the best English makers, runs freely obtained. and produces the finest mushrooms. Bricks weigh about one pound, and a brick is sufficient to plant about nine square feet. Best Spawn, 40c per lb.

Okra or Gumbo Sow about

the middle of spring in drills, and thin the plants to a foot or apart. Highly esteemed and cultivated for its green seed pods, which are used in soups or stewed and served like asparagus. Long White Velvet Long ribbed nod. Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; Vi lb., 30c;

more



lb., 70c.

§. I

G. Frary, State Food

&

Drug Commissioner, Vermillion,

Dak.

am sure you will be interested in a comment made in a letter I have just

received from the

Deputy Secretary of Agriculture of the State of Nebraska, He makes this comment upon your splendid One of the

Mr. Grant Shumway.

nursery: “ I think you have a wonderful nursery at Yankton. best of the entire west to my knowledge.”

MUSHROOM This photograph shows a field of, one acre of Onion Red Globe Dakota and onefourth acre of Southport Yellow Globe. Nine hundred bushels were harvested from this field this past season, grown from Gurney Seed by Mr. Frances of Bassett,

Nebraska. I do not them, but

know the price at -which he sold I imagine he received about the ruling price this last fall of two cents per pound.



45,000 pounds at 2c per pound $900.00. We will figure that Mr. Frances allowed land rental, bought the seed and hired all the work done, on a basis of last year’s costs with this yield per acre, the production cost should have been approximately $60.00 per acre or $75.00 for the field of one and one-fourth acres. His ledger account with the field would show, about as follows: 45,000 pounds onions at 2c per lb .

All costs of production.

Net Net

.

.

profit on \}/i acres, profit per acre. .

.

.

Parsley Parsley thrives best in a rich soil. The seeds germinate very three or four weeks generally elapsing before it makes its Sow early in spring half an inch deep, previously soaking .the few hours in tepid water. One oz. to 150 feet of drill. Champion Moss Curled A beautiful crimped and curled variety, lb.„ 50c. Pkt., 5c; oz,, 15c; Turnip-Rooted Parsley This vegetable has the same flavor as the regular parsley, but it produces small turnip-shaped roots underground that are used for flavoring soups, etc. Pkt., 5c; oz., 35c.

%

35c;

— Should

pk.,

be

March or April. Lb., 35c; pk., $1.65; bu., $5.25.

planted in

ONION SETS

From Guy

Enormously

— —

.

PARSLEY

1866

— HOUSE

PEANUTS— South

OF GURNEY, YANKTON,

S.

D.— 1925

31

Dakota Grown

Two

or three years ago we offered a quantity of South Dakota grown peanuts. It sounded almost wonderful to think that South Dakota was growing them, and we find that peanuts are just as easy to grow as potatoes, sometimes a little more so. Peanuts go right on peanutting and make a good crop. Down south they let the hogs harvest the peanuts because it is easier The to do that than it is to harvest them in any other way. southern hog has a shovel nose and enjoys this work. Up here peanuts are grown profitably, and a panful of them set in the oven, baked and eaten during these long winter evenings is cerDo you get the idea? The variety which tainly worth while. we are offering is early enough to grow in any of the northern have states, produces an immense yield of excellent nuts. enough of the South Dakota grown nuts to supply our customers I am this season, and believe it to be a profitable crop to grow. showing a photograph that will give you some idea of the yield. A peanut at its best should be planted in a light sandy soil, kept You can grow peanuts clean, and it will produce paying crops. in other soils profitably, but the light sandy soil produces the With each order for peanuts we will inclose the greatest crop. peanut bulletin that will give you full instructions for planting and care. Per lb., 30c; 5 lbs., $1.20. Postpaid. .

We

From Frank Sickler Pine County, Minn. I am sending you picture of a hill of the peanuts I got from you. Very fine and ripe. Planted on the 15th day of May and dug on the 3rd of October. It is a mighty good recommend for your seed in this country. I like all of the seeds I got from you.

FROM FRANK SICKLER A

From Nelson H. Ulmer

Richardson County, Neb.

year ago I purchased a pound of peanuts from you and harvested one and one-half bushels. I am enclosing a picture. Last spring I planted two pounds and have a good prospect for equally as good a crop. These fresh roasted peanuts taste fine on a winter evening. I have been well satisfied with

last fall

all of

H.

your seed.

ULMER



Peas, First Earlies The planting of an early crop of garden peas should be made in the spring, as soon as the ground can be worked, warm, dry situation, and covered about three inches. are usually planted in double rows 3 to 4 feet apart, and (those requiring it) bushed when about 6 inches high. The large and later sorts do better at a greater distance in a

They

apart, leaving a broad space for planting low growing

Nott’s Excelsior One of the best of the first early dwarf wn-inkled It combines good quality of American Wonder and Premium larger and more productive than the American earlier than the Premium Gem. Vines average about twelve inches in height. Pods medium size, two to three inches long. Quality best of the early ones. Seed medium size wrinkled green and somewhat flattened. Most desirable for home garden. pt., 15c; 1 lb., 35c; 15 lbs., $3.50; 100 lbs„ $20.00. peas.

Gem. Vines being Wonder and ripens

%

vegetables between.

THOMAS LAXTON



First and Best On account of its earliness and maturing it is very desirable for the market gardener. This is the earliest of the first early white peas, maturing so evenly that a single picking often harvests

practically all of the peas at one time

the entire crop. The vines are vigorous, hardy, of medium height, standing about thirty to thirty-six inches high. Pods straight, of good size, containing five to seven medium sized smooth peas of good quality for so early a variety. V3 pt,, 15c; 1 lb., 35c; 15 lbs., $3.25; 100 lbs., $19.S0, Alaska, or Earliest of All A greater acreage of Alaska is planted by canners and market gardeners than any other. It is of unequalled evenness of growth of vine and maturity of pods, which are filled with medium sized bright green peas of excellent quality. Vines medium height, about two to three



Pods good size, 2 %. to 3 Yi in. long. Invariably matures crop at one time which makes it exceptionally valuable for market gardeners and canners. V3 pt., 15c; 1 lb., 35c; 15 lbs., $3.25; 100 lbs., $19.1:0. „ f Dwarf Telephone, or Daisy Identical, and has all of the fine qualities of the old well known Telephone, except that it is dwarf in habit, attaining a height of about fifteen inches, and is ready for use about a week earlier than the Tall Telephone. Peas are ready for use seventy-five days from day Vines healthy and vigorous, producing extra of planting. Pods five inches and better large pods in great profusion.

feet. its



m

length, containing eight to ten green wrinkled peas of the well known Telephone quality. Vi pt., 15c; 1 lb., 35c| 15 lbs., $3.25; 100 lbs., $21.00.

1866— HOUSE OF GURNEY, YANKTON,

32

S.

D.

— 1925

Vegetables and Corn of Exceptional Value to the Well as the Market Gardener The five items on the opposite page are selected for their exceptional quality, yield, freedom from disease, and because they are more resistant to the ills one finds when making a garden than other varieties. While these do not make a complete garden, they are absolutely the best of their kind.

Golden Cream Sweet Corn the irregularity of the rows of the Golden Cream. This is typica 1 of one of its parents, the Country color comes from the other parent, the Golden The Gentleman. Bantam. It is ready for use about a week later than Golden earlier than Country Gentleman, and comdays Bantam, ten bines the exceptionally good qualities of both and produces ears the stalk. Very deep-grained, is fit two more to generally to use for what is termed “roasting ears ” longer than any other DeWolf’s Early Acme, our new white sweet variety except As DeWolf’s Early Acme is about eight or ten days later corn. make the most desirable varieties than Golden Cream, the two vou can plant. Price of Golden Cream Sweet Corn: 1 lb.,

You

will notice

;

40c; 5 lbs., $1.75; 10 lbs., $2.75; 25 lbs., $4.50.

DeWolf’s Early

Acme Sweet Corn

This is not pictured on the opposite page, but on account of its high quality, extremely heavy yield and the fact that it is ready for use by the time the Golden Cream commences to harden, I am listing it here, as Golden Cream and DeWolf’s Early Acme are desirable partners in the garden. Ears of DeWolf’s Early Acme in the roasting ear stage are 12, 14 and 16 rows, often twelve inches long, and the yield is immense. We harvested this fall from a single acre more than one hundred bushels of this variety. Plant the two for best results. Price of De Wolf’s Early Acme: V3 lb., 25c; y2 lb., 45c; 1 lb., 60c; 5 lbs,, $1.50; 25 5bs., $6.00; 50 lbs., $11.00.

Home

as

Gurney’s Stone-head Riviera Lettuce Head-lettuce has become as much an article of food and as necessary in the preparation of a good meal as cabbage. We have tried many varieties and the two most desirable are Gurney’s Stone-head Riviera and the New' York Wonderful or Los Angeles. The New York Wonderful is very desirable in sections where all of the weather conditions are right. In fact, it is the most desirable of any variety and is grown in larger quantities than all others put together. But in the home or the ordinary market garden scattered over the length and breadth of the United States, conditions are not always right and. you do not give as much time and attention to the cultivation and care of the head-lettuce as they do in the sections wffiere this is grown as the main and really the only crop. Consequently, we recommend Gurney’s Stone-head Riviera as the best for the ordinary grower. Heads of remarkable size, extremely hard, fit for use longest of any variety, and the entire leaves almost to the outer edge are blanched to a creamy white; quality excellent. We advise planting this over a considerable season, first as early in the spring as possible in the hot bed. Transplant in rows in the garden as early as they are safe from killing frosts. At about this time, sow additional seed in the open, transplanting this when it show's four to six leaves. Sow again about tw'o weeks later. By doing this, you will have a continuous supply of lettuce during the entire summer. It should be planted one foot apart in the row's. 3b., Price: pkg., 10c; oz., 30c: $1.09; i/2 lb., $1.00; 1 lb., $3.60.

%

CoS. N. Welch,

Pierce ttehr.

County, July 17,

1924.

Can you beat

Yankton Main Crop Pea

Peony grown

this

In the numerous testimonials received by us each year in reference to the quality of seed which we send out, a very large number of them refer to the Yankton Main Crop pea, and almost without exception state that previous to planting this variety, they were never able to grow peas in sufficient quantity for family use, but after planting Yankton Main Crop they had

in Nebraska from

sufficient for themselves, for their neighbors and some to sell. feel justly proud of this most desirable pea, because we have made it possible for the market gardener to increase his profits,

face.

roots received from your Nursery? If measures better than seven inches across its

We

Here is its photo and it wras raised in Osmond, Nebraska. Use it in

We

to his customers. have made it possible for the housewife to feed the hungry family all the delicious peas they can use and this from a small patch. It is a second early pea, wrinkled pods very large; in fact when they are growing you can hardly imagine the plant carrying a single additional pod. 1 lb., 40c; 10 lbs., $3.00; 25 lbs., $7.00; 50 lbs., $13.00; 100 lbs., $25,00.

and give exceptional quality

Gurney’s Everbearing Rust-Proof

Wax

Bush Bean Wax

When planting beans for home use, you should consider the quality, because you can grow the highest quality bean just as well as a woody, tough, undesirable one. The Gurney’s Rust-proof, with its long golden yellow, brittle, crisp pods and buttery flavor, warrant us in claiming highest quality for Next, it should be as nearly as possible disease-proof. it. Rust is the worst enemy of the bean. This bean, in more than eight years of close observance, has been entirely free from rust when other varieties in adjoining rows have been destroyed entirely by that disease. Next, you want them to produce just as much and over as long a season as possible. On the Gurney’s Rust-proof, you will have beans of suitable size for use and blossoms at the same time. Keep the pods picked as fast as they mature sufficiently for use and bearing will continue over a period often as long as six weeks. Next, consider canning quality, because even with a very small plot of these beans, you will not be able to eat them all, but will have sufficient for canning for winter. This is a most excellent bean for canning. Gather the pods, cutting them the right length for a quart jar, pack them in lengthwise as tightly as possible, then cook in the jar in the usual way. 1 lb., 40c; 5 lbs., $1.75; 10 lbs., $3.00; 39 lbs., $6.09; 60 lbs., $11.00.

first

Gurney’s Gold

Lump

Carrot

has been discovered within the last few years that carrots are one of the most delicious and desirable vegetables, being fit for use from the time they are half an inch through until the next spring; used in many different ways and delicious in all of them. In offering to you the Gurney’s Gold Lump carrot, w.e are offering one of the earliest, finest-grained, high quality carrots, in fact the most desirable of any '.for the market gardener to deliver in bunches to his customers, for the home gardener, for the table. I do not recommend this for the main crop for winter use, as other varieties will yield more per acre, but none of them will have the quality of Gurney’s Gold Lump for use in its growing state. Price: pkg., 10c; oz., 20c; lb., $1.00; 1 lb., $1.75. It

your catalog,

you

if

like.

Royal Purple Raspberry I have given you on this page a description of some of the best varieties of vegetables and corn. You will want a little fruit to go with it. In making up the catalog, orl the raspberry section, I left out through error this Royal Purple variety. It is a variety of rather late origin, extremely hardy, and a better shipping berry than the red varieties. The fruit is exceptionally large, borne in remarkable quantities, and it has proven as hardy w'ith us as the Ohta. It has been more profitable in this section in fruit production than any variety, including the Ohta. Our supply of the Royal Purple is limited to about three thousand plants for this year’s delivery. The price is very reasonable. think you should plant some of them this year. I know you wall be well pleased with the results. Per 5, 60c; $1.00 per 10; $4.00 per 50; $7.00 per 100; $25.00 per 500.

We

A Little Peony Collection On pages 138 to 140, we told you considerable of peonies, but want you to stop right on this page and let me tell you what can do in the way of low prices for a nice assortment. Everyone is entitled to a few clumps of peonies in the yard and w e grow hundreds and hundreds of varieties for trial. Some of these are immensely high-priced, but lack something after we have tried them out a number of years that would not fit them for commercial purposes, but possibly they are more beautiful than others. All of these go into the Trial Ground Mixtures and we put these up in four collections. Some of them will bloom this year; all of them next year. Every peony, no matter how good or bad it is, is originally produced from a peony seed, sometimes from natural crosses, sometimes from careful scientific crossing, but every seed produces a flower that differs somewhat from any other peony, and you can hardly imagine the great variety and variation in color that is covered in the peony lists. All of these are in the Trial Ground Mixtures. Collection No. 1 $1.25 5 plants Collection No. 2 10 plants 2.25 Collection No. 3 25 plants 5.50 Collection No. 4 50 plants 9.50 I I

r

,

— — — —

GURNEY'S STONEHEAD RIVIERA LETTUCE -

Hardest head, longest fit for use, head solid,

GURNEY’S' GOLD LUMP

CARROT No '!

other carrot so early and of such delicious quality. Pkg., 10c.; oz. 20c.;

V2 lb. $1.00.

interior leaves blanching to

<

creamy white. Unequalled for lat planting or for places that are hot ani dry.

Pkg., 10c; oz., 4Q;

y2

lb.,

$2.20; 1

H lb., lb.,

$1.50; $4.00.

, -

S

.

HEARTS OF GOLD Earliest, high yielding, de licious quality, thick meat ed, best shipping melon

grown. Pkt. 15c, oz. 40c, Vi lb. $1.10, Vz lb. $2.00 1 lb. $3.25, 5 lbs. $ 13.00 .

WINTER

WATERMELON

A

most

delicious

melon

keeping until Christmas Pkg. 10c., Oz. 25c., Vi 60c., 1

lb.

lb.

$2.00

The new

WHITE

CUCUMBER all cucumbers in size, quality and quantity

Pkg. 10c., Oz. 25c., l/ lb. 4

75c

1 lb.

$2.2

1866— HOUSE OF GURNEY, Improved Telephone

—This

YANKTON,

S.

D.— 1925

35

Second Earlies and Late Varieties

without exception the largest podded pea in existence. It is a heavy cropper and of fine quality the pods are well filled with peas of the largest Undoubtedly size, tender, and retain their sweetness well. one of the best of the tall-growing late peas. V3 pt., 15c; 1 lb., 35c; 15 lbs., $3.25; 100 lbs., $18.00. is

;



Pride of the Market A dwarf wrinkled pea, growing about 2 feet in height. Pods are medium green in color, very large, often containing 9 large peas of excellent quality. Not needing brush, a very good sort for the home garden. V3 pt., 15c; lb., 35c; 15 lbs., $3.25; 100 lbs., $18.00.

IMPROVED STRATAGEM Improved Stratagem— This

I

!

one of the finest dwarf wrinkled peas. In quality it is unsurpassed, when cooked joeing of the most delicious sweetness. Vines grow only 18 inches high, do not have to be brushed; they are extremely robust and bear many very large pods packed with immense dark green peas. A remarkably fine sort for both home and market use. The heavy demand alwavs makes this pea short. pt., 15c; lb., 35c; 15 lbs., $3.25; 100 lbs., $18.00. The Admiral A very heavy-cropping green wrinkled pea. Ripens with the Telephone and remains palatable longer than

%

is



any other variety

after

it

becomes large enough to

use.

The

8. C. Fulcher, Cherokee County, Kans. Aug. 19, 1924.

Send

me your

my



S.

It is equipped with theatre, dance hall, ball ground, tennis court, and last, but not least, an immense automobile, carrying thirty passengers, and on every decent day, during the entire year, it is loaded with patients early in the morning, a fifteen mile ride given them, the car then returns to the Hospital and is reloaded, and this operation continues until nightfall. You wonder what this has to do with winter waterI am just coming to that. I have been on the melons. grounds of the Hospital for the Insane at Yankton this summer a number of times, and it was not unusual to see hundreds of the patients on these beautiful grounds among the trees and on the lawn, each patient, if they wanted it, eating watermelon. Their garden covers about thirty acres, all grown

it is true.



Hearts of Gold When the first one was handed to me, the grower said: “Peel it with your knife and eat it as you would an apple. It is solid meat clear through from the thin skin clear to the heart.” I tried it and it was a wonderfully We found delicious melon, absolutely the best second early. it again in the Nevada deserts and carried a melon for three days, bumping around in the bottom of the car, then ate it and it was not bruised and was still delicious. This melon marketed in New York and in San Francisco at the height of the melon season, when the market was glutted with other varieties, and sold at a very profitable price to the producer, the first car selling as high as $4.50 per crate against 75c for standard varieties. Hearts of Gold, like Golden Champlain, makes a heavy crown set and ripens about one week later than Golden Champlain; shape, slightly oblong, well-netted; skin No other melon thin, meat thick and firm, quality delicious. equals it for shipping purposes. One of the growers located on the Lincoln Highway in Nevada, told me that he sold his entire They would stop and buy a melon and crop to tourists. invariably left orders for crates to be sent by parcel post or express to their friends in the East. We expressed a crate across the United States and it reached destination in perfect Market gardeners should plant heavily of this condition. Pkt., 15c; 1 oz., 40c; Vi lb., $1.10; V2 lb., $2.00; variety. 1 lb., $3.25; 5 lbs., $13.00. Mrs. Fred C. Becker, Morton Co., N. D. May 10, 1924. Bulbs arrived in fine shape. They are all planted and were certainly nice large ones and so well packed. Many thanks for the extra Gladiolus and Blackberry

am

looking forward with

%

of the

very best

pt., 15c; lb., 35c; 15

.



lbs., $20.00.

Edible Podded Peas



Dwarf Gray Sugar Vines grow to be almost 15 inches in height, with purplish blossoms. These peas are not to be shelled, but cook pods and all like string beans. This vegetable should be grown by

Winter Watermelon (See colored D., has the best equipped State Hospital, takes better care of its patients, and cures more than any other in United States. This is a broad statement, but I believe the

Lily. I flowers, t

packed with peas

White Marrowfat Almost exactly similar to Black-Eye Marrowfat as to growth, season and productiveness; A favorite on account of its being such a heavy yielder. y3 pt., 15c; lb., 25c; 15 lbs., $2.00; 100 lbs., $12.00. Horsford’s Market Garden A very fine wrinkled pea. Grows 2 feet high, very uniform and is an immense yielder. Because it yields so well it is one of the favorite canning sorts, hundreds of. acres being planted by the large packers. The pods are of only medium size, but are always full of goodflavored peas. Vi pt., 15c; lb., 35c; 15 lbs., $3.25; 100

after one trial.

Yankton,

closely

Vines 3 to 4 feet high. 100 lbs., $18.00.

lbs., $3.25;

want

to get lined up tree planting. I have had wonderful success with for nursery stock I have from your House. I shall have some pictures taken so that you can use them for the next catalog. I have purchased stock from many nurseries and yours has always been far superior to any. You may publish this letter if you care to. latest catalog, as I

abundant pods are quality.

much

pleasure for these

y3

all and will never be left out of the pt., 15c; lb., 40c; 15 lbs., $3.50.

plate,

garden

Page 34)

and they had thousands of the winter watermelons, besides thousands of other kinds. On this date, November 1st, they still have a quantity of the winter watermelons stored. It is the sweetest and best of all. You can almost taste the deliciousness of this wonderfully sweet melon hidden in its luxuriant foliage. It is not only good at time of maturity of the ordinary melon, but can be harvested and kept well up to Christmas time. It is medium-sized, almost clear white rind, the brightest red flesh and small black seeds, very firm and very tough rind, which accounts for its keeping qualities. These should be harvested when ripe, not overripe, placed in a cool dry cellar or if you wish, place them in the open in straw, seeing that the melons do not touch each other and covering all of them with sufficient straw to keep from freezing. Take them out as wanted and you will be well repaid. Price, pkt., ICc; ©z., 25c; 14 Sh., 60c; 1 lb., $2.00. from Gurney’s

seeds,

;

White Wonder Cucumber

—Color

of

White Wonder

is

nearly pure snow white. It grows to good size, usually 8 to 10 inches long, and is. very uniform In season almost the same as the White Spine, but keeps in eatable condition longer. Flavor is pleasing and flesh firm and crisps fine sliced or in salads. Its smooth, clear surface makes the White Wonder



an

Aside from excellent qualities of fruit White bears a great quantity of them. A packet of seed will Pkt., 10c; oz., 25c; in abundance. lb., 75c; 1 lb., $2.25. ideal pickle.

Wonder furnish 1/4

you cucumbers

From Henry and

Isaac Blakey, Yankton, S. D. Last spring you induced us to plant a quantity of the Hearts of Gold muskmelon. The seed seemed very high but we planted quite a few of them and were able to sell when ripe at more than twice the price of any other muskmelon. They are the thickest meated, best quality of any muskmelon we ever grew and we are going to plant a larger acreage next year, probably fifteen acres of this variety. We grow a great many acres of muskmelon and watermelon and none of our customers would buy other varieties of muskmelon whan we have Hearts of Gold on the load. They set a large number of melons close to the hill and from the first blossoms, and by doing this we have some very early melons followed by a continuous crop for a number of weeks. We always plant Gurney’s melons so we can have more melons than other growers. The quality is always good.

'

1866

36

— HOUSE

OF GURNEY, YANKTON,

The Top Notch Early Pea a pea that just suits me, and I eat some peas during the season. I like them any way they can be served, and the Laxtonian seems to be willing to be served any way, always This splendid new pea is of yielding a bountiful supply. Stratagem type, dark green pod, borne in pairs, larger, longer and more even in size than Thomas Laxton, and contains

This

is

I

grower .from an attempt to grow an ample quantity of peas than from any other vegetable. This is from improper selection of varieties, and not any fault of this- vegetable. The Yankton Main Crop Pea has produced from a single pound all the green peas that a large family can use. We do not advise you to stop with the single pound, but plant enough so hat you can use them fresh and then can some. The Yankton Main Crop is one of the most luxuriant of the semi-dwarf peas, attaining a height of about two feet, not tall enough to make it necessary to stake or brush them. This has become one of the standard medium early peas all over the Northwest. It is the one variety that can be planted and almost insure yourselves all of the green peas you can use during their season. They produce very large pods, six to nine peas, excellent quality, and yield heavily. sent this pea out the last five seasons as one of our

We

_

has more than redeemed itself. We counted pods on our trial grounds containing twelve large peas, and there were none of better quality. The leaves are very large and leathery; the vines grow about two feet high and are remarkably productive. As one of. our lady customers wrote us, “I have never been able to grow peas enough for the family before, but this year with your Yankton Main Crop we have had a great many more than we could use.” V3 p£., 15c; 1 lb., 40c; 10 lbs., $3.00; 25 lbs., $7.00; 50 lbs., $13.00; 100 lbs., $25.30. Gradus, or Prosperity Early as Challenge or Alaska; equal in quality and size to Telephone. The great drawback with the small, early round peas is lack of size and flavor. specialties

and

it



Thomas

D.

— 1925

—Laxtonian

deep green peas of excellent flavor. It is undoubtedly the best early, large-podded pea on the market. It can be picked ten days earlier than Thomas Laxton. It is in the dwarf class in habit of growth. The vines run about one and one-half feet in height. V3 pt., 15c; lb., 35c; 15 Ibsi, $3.25; 100 lbs., $20.00. fine

Gurney’s Yankton Main Crop The most delicious fresh vegetables in the garden are peas. believe more disappointment has been met with by the

S.

Pea—See colored plate, Page 33 Fred B. Bruyl, Marion County, ind. Apr. 22, 1924. I received my shipment of nursery stock in first-class shape and planted them today. The plum trees purchased from you last year are full of blossom buds and will be in bloom within a few days. Peonies are, also, coming up fine and the flower seed, including Asters and others, gave me a wonderful flower garden last year.

In Gradus, however, we have a pea coming in along with Alaska, producing dark green, handsome pods as large as Telephone, containing 8 to 10 large peas, with that rich, sugary flavor found only in the wrinkled sorts. The vines grow to a height of 2 J^ feet and produce the pods singly, all maturing at one time. pt., 15c; lb., 40c; 15 lbs., $3.50; 100 lbs., $20.00.

%

American Wonder

—One

of the earliest

Wrinkled Peas in

cultivation, of the finest quality and flavor, and very productive. Its great distinctive feature, however, is the compact and dwarf growth, seldom exceeding 10 inches in height. i/ pt., 15c; lb., 40c; 15 lbs., $3.50; 100 lbs., $20.00. 3

Gem —

Little Gem, or Premium A dwarf, green, wrinkled marrow; habit similar to the Tom It has all the sugary flavor of the late wrinkled pea. Height, 1 foot. i/3 pt., 15c; lb., 40c; 15 lbs., $3.50; 100 lbs., $23.00.

McLean’s

prolific,

Thumb.



Laxton The earliest Wrinkled Pea. Equal in quality to the best of the late wrinkled sorts. Peas are large as Telephone, unsurpassed in quality; coming into use early in June, as soon as the small round early sorts. This is certainly the finest Wrinkled Pea yet introduced, coming in with the first earlies, with pods double the size, and contain on the average 7 to 8 It is very large peas of the richest flavor. a reliable market gardener’s as well as

private gardener’s pea, and will undoubtedly take the same place among earlies as Telephone among late sorts. V3 pt., 15c; lb., 40c; 15 lbs., $3.53; 100 lbs., $20.00.

AMERICAN WONDER

1

i

\

e

t

c t

Alderman Pea

i

h

This new pea was imported by us from England and we found it in many respects the very best early main crop variety of the Telephone type. Pods very large, long, dark green, similar to the Duke of Albany and about the same season. The peas are of largest size and unsurpassed in quality. Market ardeners are demanding the large podded, dark colored sorts.

which retain their

fine color

The Alderman meets

even after shipping a long

dis-

these requirements, and, furtherrecommore, is the most productive variety of this class. mend it especially for the market gardener and home market. 40c; 15 lbs., S3.53; $29.00. pt., 15c; lb., 100 lbs., y3 tance.

We

c

1866— HOUSE OF GURNEY, YANKTON,

S.

D.— 1925

37

Parsnips

We were told that parsnips were poison until after they had been frozen. This is absolutely an untruth.

They never have been and never will be poison. It is one of the best vegetables we have, and they get much sweeter after they are frozen; consequently it is much better to freeze them if you can before using. We dig them .n the fall, pack them in boxes in sand and let them freeze. Have the boxes small enough so that you can remove one to the cellar at a time and use them up through the winter for fries and parsnip stews. Nothing better. Try it our way and you will enjoy them.

Guernsey (Improved Half Long)—The

roots

do

not grow so long as the Hollow Crown, but are of greater diameter and more easily gathered. The roots are very smooth; the flesh is fine grained and of most

HOLLOW CROWN

Pkt., 5c; oz., 15c; Vi lb., 30c; !b., 90c. Long Smooth, or HoiBow Crown A great cropper, tender, sugary and considered the best for general cultivation. Parsnips improve by remaining exposed to frost. Pkt., 5c; oz., 15c; Vi lb., 30c; lb„, 9Cc. excellent quality.



Pumpkins These are easily grown and profitable for stock feeding. At time of corn planting scatter seeds in every fourth or fifth hill, or for a large crop sow in May, in good wapn soil, in hills eight to ten feet each way; four plants to -•**' a hill.

Large Cheese, or Kentucky Field— Cheese-shaped; in flavor like Crook-neck Squash; yellow-fleshed, fine-grained, and very productive; superior to

many

Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; Vi lb., 25c; lb., 70c. large yellow variety; hard shell; an excellent Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; Vi lb., 25c; lb., 80c; 5 lbs.,

field varieties.

Connecticut Field

—A

variety for field culture. $3.75.



A very valuable new pumpkin of Japanese origin. The very thick, of a rich salmon color, fine grained, dry and sweet. Of size, early; very productive aifd highly desirable for pies or cooking. A Crook-neck variety with curiously marked seeds. Matures in 95 davs. Pkt., 5c; oz., 15c; Vi lb., 45c; lb., 51.50, prepaid. Japanese Pie

flesh is

medium

JAPANESE PIE



Tennessee Sweet Potato Grows medium size, pear shaped, slightly ribbed, color creamy white striped with green. Good keeper. Flesh firm and dry, "making it an excellent pumpkin for pie purposes. Pkt., 5c; oz., 15c; V4 lb., 30c; 1 lb., $1.00. Sugar This variety is smaller than the Large Field, but of finer grain, sweeter and very prolific. Pkt., 5c; oz., 15c; Vi lb., 30c; !b., 90c; 5 lbs., $4.03. IV! am moth King The largest variety ever introduced. An enormous yielder, having produced over 100 tons per acre. The flesh is very thick, bright orange color and of fine quality, and in flavor equals squash. Pkt., 10c; oz., 15c; Vi lb., 35c; lb., $1.10.



IVIrs.

T. Albertson, Dell Rapids, So. Dak.

1924.

am enclosing a snapshot of a load of vegetables and a portion my family. My garden was all from your seed and fit was

I

of excellent.



Pomegranate or Queen Anne

Melon Delightfully fragrant.

Avery pretty little, was grown centuries ago and is coming into popularity again. The Melons are round and yellow, irregularly striped with orange and spotted with red. The size varies from that of the peach to a good sized orange. Very aromatic. It is very easy to grow and prolific. Pkt., ICc; oz., 35c.

fruit that

Rhubarb How many

or Pieplant

farmers and city people are sup-

plied with this delicious fruit?

It

is

easily

grown and produces abundantly.

It comes the anything in the spring, just when you want it. The canned fruit from the cellar is exhausted and the price of fresh fruit at that time is almost prohibitive. It will grow any old place and will thrive there for years, but the better place, care and cultivation given it 4he better the returns. It is as easily grown from seed as from the roots, and you get a nice cutting the second season. Try at least a package of these seeds. first of

i/ 4

Early, large and tender. lb., 50c; lb., $1.25.

Pkt., 5c; oz., 15c;

CONNECTICUT FIELD FUMPIIIN

2866

38

— HOUSE

OF GURNEY, YANKTON,

D.— 1925

S.



Chinese Giant, or Procopps Giant Double the sizi King, the largest and finest mild red pepper. Not only is it immensely productive for so large a pepper, but its. enormous size and magnificent appearance make it sell most readily. Plants well branched and thickly set with enormous fruits; frequently half a dozen peppers will touch each other. It makes an excellent salad Pkt., 10c; y% 02., 25c; 02., 45c; sliced and served like tomatoes.

y4 lb.,

$1.50.



The standard sweetPlants 2 feet in height, prolific and quite early flavored scarlet sort. length and 2 inches in inches in Sweet scarlet fruits 3 ripening. diameter. Our stock is particularly fine. Earlier than Ruby King. Pkt., 10c; 02 ., 40c; y4 lb., $1-50. Bull Nose, or Improved Large Beil

Ruby King —This is the most popular large red pepper.

Plants

feet high and bear a fine crop of extra large scarlet fruits. flesh is quite thick, sweet, and so mild that the peppers may be eaten from the hand like an apple. Pkt., 10c; oz., 40c; 4 lb., $1.59.

grow 2

The

V

Long Red Cayenne

y4

Pkt., 10c; oz., 35c;

Golden Queen 75c;

y4

—The

true Cayenne, hot and Eb., $1.25.

—Largest sweet yellow pepper.

Pkt., 15c;

lb., $2.25.

Pkt., 10c; 45c; —Hottest, small bright Ruby King and a Giant pepper, proRuby Giant—A cross very large peppers, ^mild

Tobasco

oz,,

red.

lb., $1.40.

of

duces immense crops

flavor, excellent for

of_

Pkt., 10c; oz., 45c; 4 oz., $1.60. Pimiento The sweetest Pepper grown, as it does not contain the slightest trace of fieriness. The plants ductive and Peppers medium size and of a shape pickling or stuffing.



desirable for filling, and when prepared in this manner they are It may also be used in preparing salads and for delicious. When fully ripe the Peppers are a brilliant red color flavoring. and very attractive, being heart-shaped. Matures late. Pkt., 10c; 2 oz., 25c; oz., 40c; 4 lb., $1.35.

-This ia

Peppers and very productive, high and is completely laden with fine Peppers about four inches long. Flesh is very thick and exceedingly mild. Color of fruit brilliant red. Ripe fruits in 125 days. Pkt., 10c; y2 oz., 25c; oz., 40c; y4 lb,, $1.40; lb., $5.25, prepaid.

y

y

Radishes For a successive supply sow from the middle of March until September, at intertwo or three weeks. For an early supply they may be sown in a hot-bed in February, care being taken to give plenty of ventilation, otherwise they will run to

vals of leaves.



Professor N. E. Hansen’s Turkestan Radish Did you ever notice boys or going on a journey, whether short or long, and when they returned note the difference in the report of the trip? One of them all enthusiasm, telling of the wonderfully beautiful sights and useful things noticed along the roadway, the other will listen to this narrative in open-eyed wonder, will ask, “Where did you see all of that?’’ Just the difference between people; one with his eyes Open, senses alert, girls

grasping that which is good. The other possibly a dreamer that needs awakening. Professor Hansen is of the type that sees and knows all of the good things in making a trip. This new radish, brought by him from Siberia, in his 1913 tour, is one of the things picked up from the wayside. He

was sent for alfalfa seed, brought alfalfa all right, but found a great many other valuable things and brought them also. We have grown, the Hansen Turkestan Radish two years in succession, and while it is not exactly of a fixed type, it is a wonderful all-season radish. You can use it from the time it is the size of a five-cent piece until it is five, or six inches through. You can pull and eat it in the field just as you would a turnip. Pkg., 15c; 2 pkts., 25c; oz., 40c; 4 oz., $1.00.

PIMIENTO

I

Radish, Sparkler White

Tip— We

consid-

er this one of the most desirable radishes to grow. Color: deep scarlet with a distinct white tip covering at least one-third of the lower diameter of the root. It matures under favorable conditions in about twenty-five days and

hold longer than the other turnip or globe shaped radishes before becoming pithy. The maximum size before becoming over-ripe is about one and onefourth inches in diameter. Its shape is nearly round, being only slightly flattened on the under side. Pkt., 5c; 1 oz., 10c; y4 lb., 35c; 1 lb., $1.10. will

Gurney’s Extra Early Scarlet Globe RadishIn offering this Scarlet Globe Radish to the public are offering the very best radish on the market. It is earlier than any other market variety, and the quality is so crisp and sweet that it always creates a demand for more. It is especially valuable for early planting in hotbed outdoor planting. Pkt.,

we know we

10c; ©z=» 20c;

Joseph F. Nadeau, Kennlfeee County, Maine. I am enclosing picture of my erop of Rainbow Flint; 16S pounds grown from one pound of seed. The most beautiful corn I have ever seen; a real wonder. This corn matured in good shape and produced

many two-pound The Blue

ears.

Hull-less Barley

and

Hull-less Oats are splendid.

y4

!b.,

60c; !b=, $2.00.

Radish, Half Long, Scarlet or Paris BeautyOne of the most delicious of the half long Radishes? in fact, it comes in season between the Turnip and Globe Root and the Long Rooted one. Upper parts are scarlet, changing to a much lighter pink at the Always crisp and mild. Pkt., of the root. 5c; oz., 10c; 4 lb., 25c; lb., 65c. tin

y

1866— HOUSE OF GURNEY,

YANKTON,

Crimson Gianl—-A remarkable

S,

D.— 1925

feature of this Radish

is

39

that

it will

grow douhle

the size of other red forcing Radishes and will remain solid, not showing the least sign of becoming hollow It will grow six and seven inches in circumference, weighing about Shape is r ound to oval and attractive.

Pkt?^ he

-

,c c, e This new Radish is undoubtedly the finest white Radish grown. It T _J j very slender, pure white color and the tenderest of the long Radishes. It is verv early, as early as the Long Red. Compared with the Lady Finger, it is earlier and more tender, but not so large. Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; V 4 lb., 25c; lb., 70c. a ,sto "e—The quickest growing white Radish; ready for the table in from fifteen 0 ;i + to eighteen days. The Radishes are regularly “turnip-shaped.” The flesh is solid crisp ^nd mild flavor. The foliage is extremely small. Pkt., 5e; oz., 10c; y4 lb., 25c; •

m

,

is



.

m

Whit ® TjPI>ed—Very

3rl et

p^pliln?^ + an excellent marketf variety; i

early; color bright scarlet, tipped with white; Their shape is perfectly globular with rich

fine for forcing.

g£g? Jg” at the

Tender, "crisp and deficit

Edward Petsch, Arapahoe County, Colo. Nov. ^

n ^ orm you

^at my

or
plant

27, 1924. the past Spring grew

fine,

every tree and

am

I going to send you another order in the Spring. I never saw a better looking lot ox nursery stock than you sent; splendid roots and splendid tops.

P

CRIMSON GIANT RADISH



Bnghtert Scarlet, White Tipped This is a new variety, resembling the &arly Fong Scarlet shape and size, is very early, being ready for use twenty-five days after somng. Very handsome, being of the brightest scarlet, tipped with white. Pkt., ’ sc, oz., iuc; */4 id., 25c;

m

lb., 60c.



All Summer’s Radish This new Radish is a great acquisition to the list of Radishes. It can be planted very early and can be used as soon as it is large enough, but will continue to grow if left the ground until it is as large as an ordinary turnip and does not become pithy or strong. It is one of the best money makers for

m

the market gardeners on account of its long season and its immense size. Can be sliced and eaten with vinegar. Color is bright scarlet, globe in shape, and exceptionally fine Radish in bunches. Pkt.. 10c: oz., 15c; y4 lb., 40c; 1 lb., $1.50. French Breakfast A great favorite; beautiful bright scarlet with pure white tip, oval in shape, fine for open ground or force Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; V4 lb., 25c; lb., 65c.



FRENCH BREAKFAST Frances Trenouth, Renville County, N.D. The apple, plum and mulberry trees purchased from you two years ago all grew and are doing fine.

The Rainbow Flint purchased at the same time has ripened both years, producing ears fourteen inches long. We live ten miles North of the International Boundary Line in Sask., Can.

ICICLE

Sakurajima, Tokinashi and Other Mammoth Chinese and Japanese Winter Radishes These monstrous Japanese winter radishes were considered a novelty some time ago, but they are becoming just as staple a winter vegetable as potatoes, carrots or beets. These radishes produce wonderful specimens, some of them will measure as much as four or five feet long, and retain the size well from top to bottom. Some of the other varieties are globe shaped and grow

We

as large as the largest turnip. have grown these in the trial ground for regular winter use for a number of years, and we have never found any of

them but what were

crisp

and

juicy.

They

will keep perfectly until spring. We find one of the best ways to use them is to take one radish at a time, cut off from this radish as much as you expect to use in one day, return the balance to the packing box, peel and slice, leave in vinegar for about two hours, and in serving use a little oepper and

and you

will find

them

delicious

cm.'.

dkg.

EARLY salt,

These three

varieties are absolutely the best of the winter radishes. Sirtg!e

pzzkzt, 15c; three

pachas, one each

variety? 35c,

1866

40

— HOUSE

OF GURNEY, YANKTON,

S.

D.

— 1925

Winter Radish This is a much neglected vegetable, and for the same reason that you neglect the Turnip and Rutabagas. When you are making your order for vegetables you pass the Winter Radish, as you will not be ready for it before June or July. It costs only a few cents and yields abundant returns. Take them up in the

and store in your house, or cellar, same as older vegetables, and you will have fresh, crisp Radishes nearly all winter.

Chinese Rose, or Scarlet China Vi lb., 25c; lb., 60s.

California Mammoth Vi lb., 25c; lb., 60c.

—Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; —Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c;

White Winter

Round Black Spanish— Pkt.,

5c; oz,, 10c; Vi lb., 25c;

lb., 65c.

Long Black Spanish Winter— Pkt.,

fall

5c; oz,, 10c; Vi lb.,

25c; lb,, 60c,

Roselle

THE CURRANT JELLY PLANT WHICH USES ONLY ONE-HALF THE AMOUNT OF SUGAR Roselle makes a bright red jelly, that both looks and tastes like currant and would take an expert to tell the difference. Roselle Seed should be sown in April in the field where the plants are to remain in rows six feet apart and thinned to two feet in the row. The plants grow rapidly and thrive in the interior valleys. In making Pkt., 10c; oz., 60c, jelly it is best to remove the seed pod.

Squash This vegetable is greatly neglected by the majority of farmers, as it adds greatly to the winter vegetables, it is easily grown, yields abundantly, and a most satisfactory vegetable. In placing your order do not forget the new Delicious, Burbank’s Patagonia and the old standard

Hubbard.

They

are all good.

Summer Squash Giant Bush

Summer Crookneck—Matures

5c; oz., 15c; Vi lb., 40c; lb., $1.20,

Mammoth

wfliite,

White Bush Scalloped

tender and delicious.

Golden Custard

very early.

Pkt,,

—Large

size; flesh clear, waxy Vi lb,, 40c; !b., $1,20=

Pkt,, 5c; oz.. 15c; very productive early scalloped sort; Pkt,, 5c; oz=, 15c; Vi !b„

Bush—A

color rich golden yellow; quality excellent. 40c; lb., $1.20.

Fordhook, Running



Strofig growing, productive, oblong eight to ten inches long. Slightly ribbed, smooth, thin, yellowish skin. Flesh thick, light straw color. Can be used previous to maturity for a summer squash. Excellent keeper, and can be stored for winter. Cut in halves and baked for twenty minutes is equal to the best sweet potato. Pkt., 5c; oz., 15c; Vi lb., 65c; 1 lb., $2.00. Fordhook, Bush Same as above except that it forms a fruit,



like the summer Bush Scalloped Squash. Pkt., 10c; oz., 20c; Vi lb., 60c; 1 lb., $1.75. Golden Hubbard Shape similar to the Green Hubbard, Fruit medium size, ripens earlier and is more productive. weighing from six to ten pounds. Orange red color, heavily parted, flesh fine grained, thick and of rich flavor, separating from the shell readily when cooked. Shell is equally as hard Matures in 105 days. Pkt., 5c; as the Green Hubbard. oz., 15c; y4 lb., 35c; 1 lb., $1.20. True Hubbard This is the well known winter squash of which a larger acreage is produced than any other variety, and the best known of all the squash. Fruit large, olive shaped,

compact bush







Mammoth

Chilli The largest of the squashes. The fruits are long and slightly pointed at the blossom end. The skin is mottled bright orange and yellow; produces immense crop and used principally for feeding stock. It is very profitable to grow them for this purpose.

They

used for exhibition purposes and are fairly often attain a weight of 150 lbs., winter widely used. Pkt,, 10c; oz=, 15c; V* lb,, 50c;

are, also,

good bakedtype;

1

it is

They

lb., $1,70.

Oelicata—A small-fruited Variety, suitable for both summer and winter use. The fruits are oblong, slightly ribbed -with orange yellow, skin striped with dark green;, flesh thick and solid; cooks dry and is of rich flavor. Pkt,, 5c; oz., 15c; Vi

lb» 35c;

lb., $1=10.

witn skin varying trom ngnt to very dark green, skin more or less warted, hard. Flesh, rich yellow. A good shipper and keeper. Pkt., 5c; oz., 15c; Vi lb., 40c; 1 lb., $1.30. Chicago Warted Hubbard By a careful selection of the darkest green warted specimens of the well known Hubbards we have produced a squash that retains'all of the good qualities of its parent, and in addition is a very even colored, hard shelled, even sized, good keeping and shipping squash, outyielding the regular Hubbard. This is the best of the large hard shelled green squash and exceptionally desirable for the market gardener catering to the exclusive trade where he can Pkt., 5c; oz., 15c; Vi lb., 40c; lb,, $1.35. secure fancy prices.



Edward

S.

Guthoine,

Cumberland County, Me,

Apr. 28, 1924, This acknowledges receipt of the fine Waneta plum tree which I ordered from you March 27th. This tree came in splendid condition and has been set out. I thank you for the extra plant sent with it.

Symmes Blue Hubbard Squash — For

more than

fifty

years the old Hubbard Squash has been considered the acme of perfection in squashdom. In comparing yield, size, quality

and keeping qualities of squash it has always been compared with the Hubbard. The Symmes Blue Hubbard is simply a Selected for selection from the old true Hubbard Squash. better quality, for greater yield, and for its blue instead of its green color. It keeps equally as well as the Hubbard, produces a greater number of squash per vine, Goeks up a little drier and The demand for the Symmes Blue Hubbard has more sweeter. than doubled each year since we introduced it. Our stock seed of this variety has been saved each season from the bluest specimens and this past year over 98 per cent of all the squash in our field was true blue; only an occasional one going back to the original parentage. Price per pkt., 10c; oz., 25c; Vi lb., 50c; 1 lb., $1.50.

I

1866-HOUSE OF GURNEY, YANKTON,

D.

S.

— 1925

41

Gurney’s Table Queen Squash First: The size is the most desirable of any squash produced, and might be termed the individual squash. A really hungry person could eat one of them at a sitting. In the larger varieties of squash you cut one and bake a portion for the family and not wanting a continuous squash menu the balance invariably spoils before you are ready to use it. Second: The shell or rind is as thin as a sheet of and the meat separates readily from the skin. The flesh is extremely thick, f a bright golden color. The seed cavity is small and packed with seed. The color of the squash is a dark green, somewhat ribbed, and after picking and storing for some time changes to a bright golden color, but retains its quality until used. It keeps equal to the best of the other varieties, and bakes quicker than other squash, never requiring over 20 minutes in the oven. We find the most desirable way to cook these squash is to cut them in half, place a portion of butter in the lower half, cap it with the other half, and bake as though whole. They are always dry and mealy. It yields enormously. A single vine this past season produced in West Virginia more than 135 perfectly matured squash. I am showing here a picture of brother Don with a pailful of these and a split squash. It was hard to keep him out of the field while they were growing, and after they were mature he nearly boarded there. He surely believes in this new squash, and I think if I were to .search his cellar I would still find quantities of them. Don has four kids up at his house, and he says there are two things they really like. One is corn meal mush, The Table Queen can be planted in the most the other Table Queen Squash. ordinary garden. The growth is medium, but they grow a squash at almost every One man wrote me that it was the most desirable squash for market garjoint. He says, “I pile my Ford car full of these and I hardly reach town before deners. ,

sold at 75c to $1.00 per dozen.” Per pkg., 10c; 1 oz., 20c; V4 8b., SOc; 1 lb., $2.00; 5 Ibs., $9.00. Delicious Squash I cannot think of any better comparison than to figure the Old Hubbard Squash as the standard and the New Delicious as the one bidding for public favor. It has been out now years enough so that we can honestly say that it is better than any other winter squash as far as It is not so large as the Hubbard, will not yield as quality is concerned. many pounds per acre, will keep equally as good, but that one point, exquisite quality, entitles it to a place in the garden or on the farm of every I cannot express the quality better than one of our customers a few person. years ago expressed it to me. He said, “I put in a bunch of Delicious Squash in the cellar for winter. The good wife cooked one. I immediately went out and put in another bunch just on account of quality. They are This squash weighs about eight to ten better than the best sweet potato.” pounds; the color is almost uniformly of a green shade. When baked it will separate from the shell of its own weight. Pkt., 10c; oz., 20c; V4 lb., 50c; 1 !b., $1.75.

they are

all



Salsify or Oyster Plant Sow

BROTHER DONALD AND TABLE QUEEN SQUASH

early in the spring in drills 14 inches apart. Cultivate same as Gather what may be wanted for the winter and Carrots or Parsnips. let the balance stand in the ground for the next spring’s use: FVSammoth Sandwich island A new and large variety. Large Pkt., 5c; oz., 20c; Vi lb.,. 60c; lb., $2.00.

Sunflower



Mammoth Russian The plant produces very large heads which measure 12 to 20 inches in diameter, and contain an immense quantity of large striped seeds, which are highly valued as an excellent and cheap food for fowls. They eat it greedily, thrive well, and lay the greatest number of eggs. Small rations of the seed fed to horses and other stock during the winter months are of great service to keep them in fine, healthy condition, imparting a sleek glossiness to the coat of hair. It will produce a good crop of seed even on thin, poor land. Increased importance of the growing of sunflower seed is foreshadowed in the increased growth of the plant for forage Sunflowers 'as a silage crop are said to have been purposes. found to be of higher food value than corn. The California Department of Agriculture has issued a statement predicting

that sunflowers would eventually become one of the main forage crops of the West. Experiments with sunflowers have been carried on by farmers all over the West and have established the commercial value of the plant. Sunflowers can be grown in many localities where it is impossible to grow corn successfully. It is frost resistant and where it has sufficient water it will' stand the intense heat The plant of the desert regions which affects corn seriously. will be of especial value in these districts and in the higher mountain valleys of California. It is also being grown exThe tensively in other districts for seed and poultry feed. demand for sunflower seed at present is larger than the growers can supply. Pkt.. 5c; oz., 10c; lb., 25c; 10 lbs.., $2.00; 50 lbs., $8.90; 100 ibs., $15.09.

Spinach This is one of the most important of our market garden crops, and one that requires very little care. For summer use sow at intervals of two or three weeks from April to August, and for early spring crop sow in September, covering it in exposed places with straw to protect it from

f

•.

severe frost.

Long Standing

y

t

;

*

-

A

—The leaves are thick, fleshy and crumple, equal to

the Bloomsdale Curled Savoy-Leaved, and standing at least two weeks longer than any other variety without running to seed. Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; :y4 lb., 20c; lb., 50c.



Bloomsdale Curled Savoy-Leaved The leaves are krinkled like Savoy Cabbage, from whence the name; it is a very valuable variety, market gardeners. Pkt., 5c; oz., 15c; x/4 lb., 20c; lb.,

particularly for 50c.

Tomatoes how cheap we can furnish you Tomato Seed, but how good. buying Tomato Seed from us you are getting the Gurney quality, It is

In

not

which means the very best product. There are no better strains of any we are offering and the constantly increasing demand

of the varieties that for Gurney

Tomato Seed proves that we are furnishing seed that produces the best quality, quantity, smoothest and best shipping of any. Chalk’s Early Jewel The largest of the extra early bright red Tomatoes. About one week later than Spark’s Earliana; a heavier cropper of large size and better flavored fruit, which are produced continuously throughout the season. On account of the handsome appearance, bright color and extremely good quality it has commanded nearly double the price on the local market over Spark’s Earliana. On account of its extremely heavy foliage, fruit never scalds in the hottest weather. Pkt.,



5c; oz., 25c;

y4

lb., ?Tc; lb., $3.00.

WHITE BEAUTY

— HOUSE

1866

42

OF GURNEY, YANKTON, Tomato

Earlibell

S.

D.— 1925

(Selection)

We

are

waiting for someone to prove to

tis that earlier tomato than the received a letter from one of our Texas Customers today, ordering six pounds of this Earlibell seed. He tells me that he can get 25 per Cent more fruit to the acre and ten days earlier than any other tomato grown in the market garden section of Texas. This ten days means sometimes several cents per pound additional for their big crop. In the North it means ten days more of tomato season, freedom from frosts, etc. It means that we can produce tomatoes further north and at higher altitudes than ever before. This past season we grew in the Trial Ground practically every variety of claimed early tomatoes. The method adopted was as follows: On the first day of June we planted in the open ground the seed of all of the varieties and as they grew made records of the growth, the time of blooming and the first ripe tomatoes. The Earlibell this year was just five days ahead of the next earliest, and running about as much as twenty days earlier than a number of varieties that were claimed to be extra early. The Earlibell is not only earlier but it produces greater quantities of fruit with enough foliage to keep them free from sunburn, seldom rots, generally good-sized, smooth and of a bright red color that makes it very desirable for market as well have found that the Earlibell as for the home table. is also one of the best tomatoes 'for greenhouse forcing. It requires a little more trimming than some other varieties but produces quantities of good marketable Try it. Pkt., 15c; oz,, 45c; y4 lb., 51.50; l/2 fruit. !b., 52,25; 1 !b„ 53=50,

still

they have or can produce an Earlibell.

I just

We

Gurney’s Giant Conner— The true stock of this variety outyields any other tomato and on account of its solid meat and small seed cavity we call it the best for home or factory canning. Last Season a single plant ripened for one picking 33 tomatoes, five of which weighed more than one pound each; the picking weighed 21 pounds, and the plant continued to produce until killed

by

frosts.

Fruit very smooth, firm, Solid meat and one of the best for shipping, colors up well while firm and before thoroughly ripe. This makes it extra desirable as a ship-

ping tomato. smooth shape

EARLIBELL SELECTION

Pkt., 15c;

V2

On it

account of its immense Size and its always commands the highest price.

oz,, 50c; 1 oz,, S5c;

y4

lb,, $2.75.

Tomato Record Drilled in the open on June 1st, 1920, the following varieties Early Tomato: North Dakota No. 51, North Dakota No. 69, North Dakota No. 103, Burbank’s Earliest, Earlibell Selection, Earlibell Regular Strain. These were allowed to grow to a height of about 4 inches, then thinned to twenty-five plants of each variety and given best cultivation; were not “trellised” or “trimmed.” First fruit commenced to show color August 15th, but was not disturbed in any way until August twenty-first; then all fruit entirely ripe was taken from each vine with following results: of

—Twelve medium. 60—Thirty-seven

North Dakota No. 51 smooth,

solid,

good

fruit,

color, crop set

good specimens, Lacks foliage.

North Dakota No. fruit, not as good specimens as 51. Extra heavy yield; not so good color. Lacks foliage. Medium strong grower.



North Dakota No. 103 Twenty-five fruit. Smooth, better Good yield. Just enough foliage to

than either 51 or 60. protect from sunburn.

Fruit — 60 —borne good clusters good marketable We saved some seed We at 15c per package— one packet of each for 35c. Burbank— Nine Fruit rough, color quality

and 103

Strong grower.

in

of all

of

51,

size.

of all three.

offer it

fruit.

fair,

ood, solid. Strong grower, well set with fruit. ut too late to be classed with the earliest.

Yields well,



Earlibell Selection Forty-eight fruit. Smooth, color good, solid, borne in clusters of about five to Seven; very even size; most of 48 fruit over ripe. Strong grower, good foliage, quality excellent.



Dwarf Stone A splendid new Tomato, originating with the famous Livingstons. In habit of vine it resembles -Dwarf Champion, but it is of stronger growth and more erect: The fruits are the same color and size as the regular Stone, with the additional advantage of the Dwarf Champion habit. Under ordinary field culture this sort completely outclasses Dwarf Champion. Here is the record. Ten fruits picked at one time from one vine weighed 5 lbs. and 3 ozs. Specimen, fruits of 1 lb. each are very common. Pkt., 5c; oz., 30c; V* lb*» $1.00; lb., 53.00.



Earlibell Regular Strain Thirty-four over ripe fruit. so smooth as Earlibell Selection; identical otherwise. Full ripe fruit could have been picked from either strain Earlibell five days in advance of any other variety.

Not



Albino or White Beauty Tomato Wonder of wonders, at last a white tomato! For years it has seemed impossible

to propagate a pure white Tomato of good quality, but the impossible has been accomplished. The New White Beauty contains absolutely no acid and so will make tomatoes agreeable to thousands of people who have heretofore avoided them on account of the acidity.

White Beauty is ivory white in color, showing no trace of red and the flesh is almost paper white. It grows about as large as Stone and is firm and solid, carrying very few seeds. Ripens medium early. Fine to grow for exhibition with red and yellow varieties. This is absolutely the best white tomato The supply is limited. Pkt., 15c; l/2 oz., 30c; to be had. lb=, 51.50, ez., 50c;

%

John Baer Tomato



In 1914 this variety was extensively advertised as a marvelous introduction. Perfect fruit in 30 days. The introducer claims: “John Baer Tomato produces large, solid, shipping fruit in 30 days, 50 to 100 fruit to each plant; ripens evenly up to the stem, does not scald', blight or crack; bright red color, a delightful flavor, almost seedless, Tomatoes weigh often ten fruits in a cluster, solid and meaty. about 6 2 ounces.” These are truly wonderful claims, and we think it would be well for our customers to give the “John Baer” a trial. Our seed was grown from stock supplied by the introducer. Pkt., 10c; Vi oz., 20c; oz., 35c; y4 lb., $1.00.

y

New Stone—The Tomato for a main crop. Choicest seed. call this the king of the Livingston kinds, which- are the best types of large, smooth, solid, “beefy” Tomatoes. If asked to select one main crop, market sort, we advise this. Color, fine scarlet; stem set high, core small and shallo-w, so that but little is lost when it is taken out of the fruit before Pkt., 5c; oz., 25c; slicing. If in doubt, buy the New Stone. V4 lb., 55c; lb., $1.65.

We





Beauty (Livingston’s) A very fine variety of large^size; grows in clusters of four or five; color glossy crimson with a purplish tinge; very solid, with a tough skin, making a desirable market variety. Pkt., 5c; oz., 25c; y4 lb., 70c; lb., $2.15.

Bonny Best— (88 days)— Large smooth fruit of a rich Fruit scarlet red, the color demanded by many markets. thick, with a small core, an excellent tomato for any purpose. Nearly globe shaped, slightly flatSlices exceptionally well. tened at stem. Borne in clusters of 5 or 6 fruits, all ripening evenly together. Pkt., 10c; oz., 35c; x/4 lb., 90c; lb., 53.00, .



Acme One of the medium earlies handsomest fruit. The a medium size, perfectly smooth and regular in shape; very solid and a great bearer; color dark red, with a purplish tint. Pkt,, 5c; oz,, 25c; x/4 lb., 60c; lb., $1=75, fruit is of

.

1866— HOUSE OF GURNEY,

YANKTON,

S.

D.— 1925

43

New Tomato—Mr. Topp We

have grown this excellent new tomato one more. season, and it has justified all that we have claimed for it, except that it is not the proper tcmato for the market. gardener to plant in large quantities. The Topp tomatoes produce large clusters of fruit as shown in the photograph, and

Mr

on that account the tomatoes are apt to be smaller than the gardener likes We believe this tomato will pro ’uce equally as many to use for his trade. pounds of fruit per plant as any tomato you can grow. The photograph shows a cluster of ripe fruit weighing over 7 pounds. This plant produced one stem of blossoms with over 350 flowers open at one time, and ripened 50 full size Topp tomatoes in that cluster. It is a very rapid, rank grower, and to get best results we advise staking it. It is the earliest of all the

tomatoes except the Earlibell. They are of excellent quality, beautiful color, bright red, of medium size on account of their producing such an The fruit is always smooth and round. of fruit. have also found it especially valuable for forcing in the greenhouse for

We

immense quantity winter market.

-

25c the package.

Early Dwarf Champion—A great favorite on account of its dwarf habit and upright, tree-like growth, which permits close planting, fruit resembles Acme; medium size, the color being a purplish pink, very smooth and symmetrical, fine quality, very solid meated. The vine growth is very strong and stiff, so that it needs almost no support. Pkt., 5c; oz., 35c;

y4

lb., $1.00; lb., $3.25.



Spark’s Earliana The earliest, is not only remarkable for its

Tomato

large, smooth, red earliness, but for its

Tomato.

This

very large

size,

handsome shape and bright red color. Its solidity and fine quality are quite equal to the best medium and late sorts. Enormously prolific. The very finest for the Northern market “ * and home garden. Pkt., 5c; oz., 25c; y4 lb., 60c; lb., $2X~

NEW TOMATO,

New Every

MR. TOPP “Globe” Tomato

Tomato off this variety just alike. Size, meat and qualify. Every vine full

color, solid

and ripens

Home

early.

Get next to

it.

SVIarket

and

Gardener,

An extra good all around sort,

of distinct globe shape, with quite a large percentage of elongated fruits. It is a beautiful variety, and on account of its shape, one that permits of a greater average number of slices to be taken from each fruit than from other sorts. it belongs among the earlies. fruits are of large size; and a good marketable size retained throughout the season; always smooth, of firm flesh and has few seeds ripens evenly color a fine glossy rose. An exceedingly productive variety, and a remarkably good keeper. Pkt., 10c; oz., 35c; 2 ozs., 60c; !4 lb., SOc. Pofiiderosa Tomato This is the largest of the tomatoes. Often producing fruit weighing two pounds or more. Very bright red, generally smooth, fine vigorous growers, producing large crops of this immense fruit; quality very good. Pkt., 10c; oz., 45c. Golden Queers This is the only first class large yellow tomato. Pkt., 5c; oz., SOc; y4 lb., 65c; lb., $2.00.

In time of ripening

The

is

;

;





NEW STONE

Sioux City, Iowa, Aug. 16, 1924. When is the best time to plant Bull Pine seed, which you say grows as ast as the Cottonwood? I wish to get some of the seed at the proper time for planting. Send me the next catalog. I am going to venture a suggestion which I think might help you and it certainly would help some of us who do the cooking. Why not ask in your catalog for recipes of ways to cook the various vegetables you describe? Some of the women on the farms serve deliciously cooked and seasoned vegetables, but unless one happens to dine with them and ask them “how to do it, one is left wondering what all the things mentioned in For instance, I find that Swiss Chard tasted very good cooked with two or three pieces of bacon, catalog are good for. leighbors all tried it (out of my garden) and liked it, and came back for more. I wonder if it would be too expensive to put out a little recipe i



,

book with your name on it, or to print a recipe or two above each description in your catalog? I think it would increase your business, though, very likely, you have all the business you care for without the additional expense.

The Swedish and Norwegian to cook those Scandinavian vegetables. CLARA B. WOLFE.

women know how

I am more than pleased to adopt the suggestion of Clara B. Wolfe, and I am going to ask everyone who has a special, favorite way of preparing vegetables or fruits to send me their recipe written plainly and in full, and I promise them the

book in 1926. We are going to pay each person $1.00 for each recipe that we accept and print in this book. Send me the best you have! Let’s make vegetable and fruit growing

recipe

System of growing Chalk’s Early Jewel Tomatoes by J. O. Havaland, of North Dakota. He lives only seven miles from the Canadian line in northwest North Dakota. With this system, he was able to mature these fine tomatoes in quantities on June 26th, which is really a remarkable record. It would be well to adopt this method in the extreme north.

worth

its

maximum.

Will you not co-operate with me?

D. B.

GURNEY.

1866

44

— HOUSE

OF GURNEY, YANKTON,

Garden Huckleberry— A wonderfully productive

cranberry Pkt., 10co

of the

and are

delicious for preserves or pies.

HUCKLEBERRY

PIE

by Airs. A. G. Sandy, Gretna, Nebr. Stem and wash one pint of berries.

Add

cold water to cover. cup sugar. pinch of salt.

1 1

Cook until soft. Then add one tablespoon vinegar and

D.— 1925



Yellow Pear Fruit bright yellow, distinctly pear-shaped; and used largely for preserving. The stock we not the large yellow plum often

plant

producing literally ropes of jet black fruit along its branches from the ground to its tips, plants grow about four feet tall, fruit matures about with ordinary tomatoes, size about that

S.

of rich flavor

offer is the true pear-shaped,

sold for it. Pkt., 10c; oz., 45c. Yel!o%v Ground Cherry, Prospect This is of the dwarf growing type, earlier and more suitable to the northern states than the tall spreading variety. Fruit about the size of the common cherry, bright yellow, enclosed in a loose husk. Bears abundantly and is most excellent for sauce and preserves. Pkt., 10c;

ry

cz., 45c.

2 tablespoons of flour. Dissolve in enough cold water to make a smooth batter. Stir constantly to prevent scorching.

Bake between two crusts. Serve warm. Try them, they are delicious!



Husk Tomato Plants strong and of spreading habit. Immensely productive. Fruit about inch through. Borne in a tight fitting husk. Fruit when mature nearly purple. Very excellent for prePkt., 10c; oz., 45c.

%

New

Hybridized Potato Seed FROM THE SEED-BALLS— HEADQUARTERS STOCK. Millions never saw a Potato Seed Ball. Thousands have tried in vain to get the seed. is your opportunity. This unrivaled seed will produce an endless variety of new kinds. Your fortune may be in one of them. They are as easy to grow as tomatoes.

Now

Tom Sutton ground cherry on your own farm. And — Smokes for yourselfexpense.

Tobacco,

Grow Them

think of the greater quantity at less Not being an expert on tobacco myself, I will have to give you the originator’s description, and the experiences of the boys around here who use tobacco and claim to know a good tobacco from a “stogie.” This tobacco was originated in Minnesota, is extremely early, yields wonderfully, and if I am to believe the fellows who use it, it is of remarkably fine quality. The originator says of -it “I feel that I have perfected as nearly a perfect tobacco for the northwest as it is possible to grow. I have crossed the General Grant variety with Evans Cinnamon, a Canadian variety, and have a tobacco that combines earliness, large size, productiveness, mild flavor and fine quality. It is unequalled as a pipe and cigar tobacco. crop was all right to cut before frost this year. Stock four to six feet high, with as many as 24 large leaves on a stalk. Many people would grow gladly their own tobacco if they could do so without the rank flavor commonly found in northern grown tobacco. I wish you would note specially the light eolor, also the white ashes after burning. Compare carefully with any common cigar and note the extreme difference. Note also, and specially, that it has no green, rank flavor and does not bite the tongue. I passed out a quantity of the leaves and crumbled tobacco to the boys who smoke. They accepted it, I suppose, just to indulge the “Old Man,” but I insisted on their lighting their pipes in my presence, and the general report was that it was tobacco of excellent quality, and I believe them, for they are begging for more of it every day. Some of them would be willing to furnish the match want to have all the if I would furnish the pipe and tobacco. Northwest tobacco users purchase a package of this Thomas Sutton tobacco this season. 15c the package, 2 packages for 25c. :

My

We

PHOTO OF POTATO SEED BALLS— ONE-HALF NATURAL SIZE.

IT

it is

from these that ALL valuable new

varieties of Potatoes are produced. distiiict Seedling Potatoes from the

Growing new and

Seed-Ball Seed is intensely interesting. the greatest curiosity of your garden. positively produce innumerable

They will be This seed will

new

kinds, colors, shapes, sizes, and qualities. The product will astonish you. Some may be of immense value and bring you a golden harvest. Every farmer, gardener, and bright boy should plant a few packets. You may be one of the lucky ones. Full directions on every packet.

READ THESE EXTRACTS FROM CUSTOMERS’ u

LETTERS.

I

Seed,

grew 101 Potatoes from one plant of your Potato Every plant was a different. variety.” Mrs. Ellen Keener. Hills from one Packet; many kinds and early, some late. 94 Potatoes in one hill.”

“I raised 50 colors;

some

J.

Packet, IS cts* 2 for 25c«

5 for 50c*

H. Skinner. 10 for $1.

TOM SUTTON

1866— HOUSE OF GURNEY,

YANKTON,

S.

D.— 1925

45

Turnips Along in June each year we receive numerous orders for these Seeds Nearly everybody fails that should have been sent with early orders. to include Turnip and Rutabaga Seed with the: regular order on account The result is when of their not being wanted until late in the summer. ready to plant you do not have the Seed, so go without. Include all you are going to need with your first order; you are then sure of having plenty of good seed when planting time comes. Sow the earliest Light, well-manured soil is best suited for Turnips. varieties in April, in drills about 15 inches apart, and thin out to from For a succession sow at intervals until the end 6 to 9 inches in the rows. of August.

Golden Ball (Robertson)—A rapid grower, globe-shaped and

beautiful color lb., 75c.

and a good keeper.

Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c;

y4

lb.,

of

25c;



Large White Globe One of the most productive; in rich soil the roots will frequently grow to 12 pounds in weight; globe-shaped, skin white and smooth. Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; V4 lb., 25c; lb., 80c. Purple, or Red Top Strap Leaf Flat; fine flavor and one of the most popular varieties grown, and when sown late it is one of our best Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; Vi lb., 20c; lb., 60c. varieties, an excellent keeper. Extra Early White IVSilan Extra early Turnip, in which the extreme earliness, small top and tap root of the Purple Top Milan are united with Pkt., 5c; oz., 15c; Vi lb., 35c; lb., $1.4®. the clear, white skin and flesh.









Sutton’s Snowball New English Turnip As its name implies, a round, clear white turnip of unusual size and a great yielder. Should be planted in July for winter use. One of the best keepers. Pkt., 5c; it is

oz., 15c;

% lb., 35c;

lb., $1.09.

Gurney’s Purple Top White Globe Turnip



This is an all-season it is large enough to use until the following GURNEY’S WHITE GLOBE above medium; heavy foliage, and the best turnip of all of them. This new English Turnip was brought from England by us proven fully up to the originator’s recommendation, and we three years ago and was recommended to us by one of the urge all to give it a trial. Pkt., 19c; oz., 15c; V4 lb., 35c;

Turnip;

sweet from the time

is

spring; size

largest turnip specialists as the best ever originated.

It

has

1

lb., 9®c.

Rutabagas or Swedes am'going to make this a little personal appeal to the fellows Montana, North Dakota, Northern in the extreme North. Minnesota, Northern Wisconsin, in fact, all of that strip of territory across the northern part of the United States where root crops, such as rutabagas, turnips, carrots, etc., grow to perfection, where you can produce a greater yield than in any other section of the United States, where they will outyield the potato crop, and where they will bring equally as much money if you grow them in quantities as your best acre of potatoes. Do you know that all of us fellows south of that northern point, where these root crops grow to perfection, are hungry every winter for your very best rutabagas, your turnips, your carrots, etc., and we do not get them unless we pay immense prices for I

are recognized as the acme of perfection in good crops and there is a demand for them that will take every bushel you can grow. When we ship our seed potatoes in from the north we always manage to get a few bags of rutabagas, carrots, etc., in the cars, for the reason that the quality is so much better than those of our own growing in this section, that we simply cannot get through the winter without

They

them?

Why

having these particular vegetables. not grow them in larger quantities so that you can load cars? can find you a market for them every year. will be glad to do it. In fact, we handle' hundreds of carloads of produce of all kinds each fall and have generally paid nearly as much for these root crops as we have for potatoes, sometimes more. For feeding stock in Fall or Winter there is nothing superior to Turnips or Rutabagas, as they are much liked by all kinds of stock and serve to keep them in good condition. cannot too earnestly recommend farmers to increase their sowings largely, for we are sure the crop will prove remunerative. Purple Top Yellow Best variety of Swedish Turnip in cultivation. Hardy and productive; flesh yellow, of solid texture, sweet and well flavored; shape slightly oblong; terminates abruptly with no side or bottom roots; color deep purple above, and bright yellow under the ground; leaves small, light green, with little or no neck; the most perfect in form, the richest in flavor, and the best in every respect. Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; Postpaid. V4 lb.» 25c; lb., 65c; 5 lbs., $2.25.

We

We

We



Krasnoselski Russian On

grounds for past three seasons this gave the and produced the largest yield of any of the rutabagas, account of the dry, hot weather, most varieties became hollow a strong. This was solid entirely through the season, making an ex large percentage of good-sized rutabagas, bright yellow in color and excellent quality for table use. This will take the place of the ol< varieties on account of the increased yield and quality of the fri Pkt., ICc; cz., 15c; lb., 35c; 1 lb., $1.00. our

trial

faction

%

RUTABAGAS FOR SEED SELECTION

—— — 1866

46

— HOUSE

OF GURNEY, YANKTON,

S.

D.— 1925

DOWN ON THE OLD FARM UNDER AN ELM TREE

A

Tree Like This Grows from Seed

This farm is down on the Jim River just a few miles from Yankton. It is not owned by the company, but by brothers, I used to own it but they S. S., P. S., C.- A. and Donald. wanted it worse than I did and I sold it to them. The big tree in the picture is a monstrous elm tree wnthin about a hundred yards of the Jim River bank. It has a total spread of 87 feet, and two feet from the ground it has a circumference of more than fifteen feet. It has undoubtedly stood there for more than two hundred years and is in perfect condition and may be there two hundred years from now. The folks under the tree are just a bunch of the Gurneys having a little fourth of July celebration of their own. In the picture is the mother of the Gurney bunch, 77 years old; her brother, 84; a sister, 80, and a sister, 86 years of age, all of them strong, active and younger than lots of the younger

ones. There are also grandchildren and great grandchildren, and when the picture was taken there w-as a lot more of the tribe down in the river swimming.

This picture of the grand old elm tree demonstrates to you what a tree will do when given an opportunity. Most shade and street trees are planted so closely that they seldom develop into anything more than a pyramidal, crowded, ill-shaped tree, and when its close neighbor has to come out it leaves the tree that you want to save deformed beyond recovery. Plant your shade trees and your street trees 'far enough apart It will so that they will not interfere one with the other. cost you less money and give you better results. We want to sell you shade trees but we do not want to and will not sell

you more than you need

if

we know

it.

Evergreen and Tree Seeds Evergreens may be grown easily from seed if the proper varieties are selected and reasonable care is given them. a few varieties which are most successfully grown by the amateur, and believe you will have no trouble in making a success of it. There is nothing that improves the looks and value of a place so much as Evergreens. It is the general impression that they are very high priced, hard to transplant and only suitable for the front yard in the town or city. This is a mistaken impression, as they are cheap and easily transplanted. The one thing to remember in transplanting an Evergreen Tree is never to allow the roots to become dry for even one minute.

We

list

In preparing your seed bed it should be made about three and length according to amount of seed to be placed Rake it over smoothly and sow broadcast, then cover Plant the to the depth of about one-half inch with fine soil. seed in the springtime when the soil is warm and mellow shade completely until germination takes place, then remove one-half the shade and raise the balance from six to ten inches above the plants, leaving shade on the entire summer after feet wide, therein.

r

7

;

Red Cedar Bull Pine.

—This

grow s as readily from seed as does the 7

Very desirable

for shelter or fence posts.

Grows

Pkg., 15c; oz„, 85c. Blackberry Lily or Leopard Flower Seed sown early in the spring produces bulbs the same year about three-fourths of an inch through. These bloom the next year, growing to a height of about two and one-half feet and producing brilliant Absolutely hardy and the easiest scarlet lilies in abundance. Pkg., 15c. lily to grow. Ash This is the hardwood tree of the North and is readily rapidly.





grown from seed. About three weeks before planting the Ash seed place them in a cloth sack and soak them for all of three weeks. They should be planted about May 1st. Do not allow them to dry after they have been soaked they will germinate and come up wdthin five or six days after planting if they have been soaked long enough. Oz., 19c; V2 lb., 40c; lb., 70c. Catalpa Speciosa, or Hardy Northern Catalpa This is the only Catalpa that is of any value in the North, and aU the seed offered by us is Dakota grown; consequently, it is the hardiest of this variety. These do well in any part of Iowa, South Dakota, or any place south of this latitude. Seed are very light and consequently there are a great number to the Pkt., 15c; oz., 40c; lb., 53=00. ounce. Honey Locust This is one of the most rapid growing and most beautiful of all of the northern shade and timber trees. In the spring it is covered with long racemes of pure white, very fragrant flowers, and in the fall and early winter is covered with the long and tropical-looking seed pods, seed about the •ssize ok -a-mavy bean.- This- is one of the most valuable, most ;





planting. Shade can be made with a frame made of boards or laths, or with branches of trees. Bull Pine (Ponderosa) This is the most easily grown from seed of any Evergreen and is successfully growm by any person. One of the most rapid growing, hardy and best trees for windbreak. Will do w7 ell anywhere that any tree grows. Pkt., 15; oz., 50; lb., S1.90; lb., $6.50.



%



Black Hills Spruce One of the best ornamental Evergreens grown; resembles the Norway Spruce. Grows much broader and heavier. This variety only seeds once in several years, consequently seed is very scarceandhigh priced. Pkt., 15c; oz., 75c.



Jack Pine A standard rough, rapid cold weather tree. Absolutely hardy; a wonderful windbreak and easily grown. Pkt., 15c; oz., 65; V2 lb., 54.00.



Colorado Blue Spruce A rare, elegant tree, with foliage of a rich blue. One of the most distinct and striking of all the Spruce family. A free grower and perfectly hardy. Pkt., 15c; oz., 75c. rapid growung and easiest grown of any of the forest trees. Oz., 20c; y2 lb., 70c; lb., $1.25. Black Locust A native American tree of large size and rapid growth. Flowers in long white racemes, very fragrant, valuable for timber and is being largely planted for timber, osts, etc. Along the railroad lines east of Chicago there are undreds of miles planted to Black Locust. This tree is easily growm and perfectly hardy. Seed very small. Oz., 35c; 1/2 lb., $ 1 . 20 ; 1 lb., $2.25. Russian Mulberry This well-known hedge, shade and fruit tree grows readily from seed. Often grow s to a height of 4 feet the first year. Our seed of this is growm here at Yankton. Pkt., 20c; oz., 70c; lb., $10.00. Russian Olive Easily grown from seed, the hardiest and best hedge and windbreak for north and west. Oz., 15c; 1/4 lb., 45c; 1 lb., $1.35.





7

Box Elder 1/4

lb.,

(See description nursery section.) 30c; 1 lb., 75c.

Hackberry

One

Oz., 15c;

of the finest trees for all purposes. (See description nursery section.) Pkt., 15c; oz., 25c; lb., 75c; 1 lb., $2.50, .

—A

Caragana, or Siberian Pea Tree

very hardy hedge

or low growing tree from Siberia, bearing clusters of golden yellow fragrant flowers in immense quantity early in the spring. These followed by reddish colored seed pods that hang on through a portion of the summer. Foliage dark green, while the bark is light green or silvery in color, making a very orna1 /, f h. , $ 1 , 00 ; 1 !b,, $3,75, mental hedge plant. Oz,, .

1866— HOUSE OF GURNEY,

YANKTON,

D.

S.

— 1925

47

FLOWER SEEDS New

and Standard Varieties Flowers from seed are usually

Annuals bloem and

known

ripen seed the

as Annuals, Biennials

first

Biennials do not generally flower the

and Perennials.

year and then perish. first

season,

and are

in perfection

one year.

Perennials continue to flower several years in succession.

bloom the

first

year

if

sown

Many

of

them

early.

Hardy Annuals, Biennials and Perennials can be sown

open ground early in the spring, if desired, the Biennials and Perennials will not require any protection in winter. The blooming period of all classes may be greatly extended by picking off the flowers as soon as they begin to, fade. Half-Hardy Annuals, Biennials and Perennials should not be sown in open ground until settled warm weather, though they can be sown in the house, if desired, early, and afterwards transplanted. The two latter need to be protected in the winter, or houses.

in the

carried over until spring, in cold-frames or green-

if

'.Last summer I drove more than 8,000 miles, inspecting our own and other crops of flower, vegetable and field seeds. I carefully inspected thousands of acres of the most beautiful flowers in America, grown for seed purposes, and I have added this year a number of very desirable varieties that we have not

catalogued previously.

Aquilegia (Columbine) Popular hardy perennials that bloom very freely during spring and early These plants grow wild in the timbered country and are known to all the children as Honeysuckle. They come in a great variety of colors and Pkt., 5c; oz., 75c. are easily grown. Aquilegia Coerulea The most beautiful of the Columbines; sky blue, long-spurred, free bloomer, hardy perennial. Seed planted early will bloom the same season and last for a number of years. Pkg., 15c.

summer.



Alyssum

Gem —

Little Plants 3 to 4 inches high; they soon become a large mass of white scented flowers; fine for bordering; hardy annual. Pkt., 10c; 1 oz., 48c. Sweet Fragrant, white, hardy annual. 3/ri foot. Piet., 5c; oz., 3fflc.

AQUILEGIA (COLUMBINE) COERULEA

Anemone

Antirrhinum, Snap-Dragon An old favorite border plant, which has been greatly improved, with dark and glossy leaves and large, curiously-shaped flowers, with finely marked throats. They bloom the first season from seed sown in the spring, but the blossoms will be much stronger the second year. Succeeds best in dry, loamy soil. Half-hardy perennial. A few leaves of any light litter thrown over them will help to carry them through the winter, or they may be treated as annuals. The Giant-Flowered grows about flowers than the old sorts. Giant-Flowered Firefly Pkt., 10c; i/2 oz., 40c.

—This Snap-Dragons.

Purple King

2 feet high, with larger

— Scarlet,

crimson

and yellow.

the forerunner'of a race of new and distinct Flowers more than twice the size of the ordinary Antirrhinum. Do not fail to include it in your Pkt., 10c. order. Snap-Dragon Empress The most brilliant crimson in the

Dwarf

compact,

free

bloomer

and

easily

grown.

Pkg., 15c.



Amaranthus



Tricolor (Joseph's Coat) Beautiful foliaged plants, growing three to five feet high. They are useful as borders for taller growing plants or for the centers of large beds. Should be grown in warm sunny situations and given plenty of room to develop. The ornamental leaves are red, yellow and green.

D. State Flower)

or Wind-flower is one of our choicest autumn at perfection when most other flowers have ceased blooming. Hardy perennials, easily grown from seed, blooming the first year if sown early. Produces large double flowers in mixed colors. Pkt., 10c.

and

is

Abutilon (Flowering Maple) Desirable plants for the house in winter and effective specimens for the lawn in summer. They will bloom the first year if sown early. Half hardy perennial, 1% to 3 feet. Mixed colors. Pkt., 20c.

Achillea—

is



field.

(S.

The Anemone

flowers

The

Pearl

—A hardy perennial;

many

frost with feet high.

covered from spring until very double, pure white flowers. Grows two

Pkt., 10c=

Ageratum As an addition to the flower garden’s blue, the Ageratum is a valuable flower. The dwarf sort being particularly desirable for borders, edging, etc., being very compact and erect. Halfhardy perennial.

Mexicanum Mixed — Blue and

Tom TSmmh — Dwarf edging.

ft.

white. 2 ft. Pkt., 10c. blue, distinct variety, desirable for

Pkt., IQc.

Balsam Apple

Pkt., 10c.

A very beautiful,

cut leafed, rapid growing, annual climbing vine, producing beautiful flowers, followed by seed pods burstA very ing open and showing the interior, bright crimson. satisfactory climbing vine for hot, dry places where others will not do well. The seed grows readily and rapidly. Pkt., 10c; oz., 40c.

Balloon Vine



Hardy Annual Climber A rapid-growing climber, very It will grow to a height of from 10 to 15 desirable in its place. feet, bearing beautiful white flowers which are followed by its seed-pods of a balloon shape. Pkt., ICc; oz., 35c.

Balsam or Lady Slipper F Magnificent plants

Tender annuals. for garden culture. The largest flowered of any of the Balsams and perfectly doubled. The individual flowers frequently measure 2J^ inches across, the plants forming symmetrical, gjF

Camelia Flowered



well branched, erect bushes, the branches being almost covered with the magnificent double flowers. In color they vary from the brightest scarlet to pure white, including spotted violet, royal purple and many others. Pkt=, 10c; oz., 40c.

Bean

Scarlet



Runner

Bean Scarlet Runner The well known rapid-growing annual climber, producing bright red flowers, from July to September. The foliage being dense, makes it splendid for porches or any location where shade is desired. Pkt., 5c; 1/4 Sfo,, 20c; 1 lb., 50c.

From Mrs. Clyde McNeil, Wessington, S. D. I am enclosing a picture of our little girl, three years, months old and

I

nine

This picture was taken just before she left us The Spirea in the picture is two years have ten of them, purchased of you two years ago.

old.

for a better world.

18 66—

48

HOUSE OF GURNEY, YANKTON,

D.

S.

— 1925

Asters (1)

petals,

The Rochester,

or Vick’s

Mikado

narrow, long and reflexed,

—Pink

bending and

curling across each other in such magnificent disorder as to make it the fluffiest aster grown, color most exquisite shade of lavender pink, plants are very vigorous and produce immense quantities of very large flowers, ranging from four to six inches Pkt., 10c. in diameter. The earliest of all (2) Queen of the Market



except No. 8. Grows about nine inches high and very branching; the fine double flowers are produced freely on long stems, making it valuable for Mixed, pkt., 10c; x/\ oz., 25c. cutting. The magnificent (3) New White Branching large double white flowers, 4 inches in diameter, excellent for cutting. are borne upon long stems, The big broad petals are curled so as to give the Chrysangraceful of a blossoms the appearance themum. Pkt., 10c; Vi oz., 30c; oz., $1.00. (4) Asters, the Latest, American Beauty— We are offering this in the novelty or special class and we want to say that it stands head and shoulders above all other asters Tor length of blooming period and quantity of flowers produced. It was in bloom with us this past season for over three months, more than one and one-half months longer It produces very large than any other aster. flowers, the inner petals being curved and of a deep rose color, borne on extra stout Stems from 15. to 20 inches in length, making it a good companion to an American Beauty Rose. Seed of this aster planted in the early spring should be in bloom the latter part of July and stay in bloom until frost comes. Pkt., 15c; 2 for 25c.





This is a (5) Sensation, the New Red Aster good companion for the American Beauty and if you want the best in the various colors, you should have, at least, a package of this new red aster. It is brighter red than any other aster and produces very large double flowers measuring as much as four inches across; the blooming period is about the same as the American Beauty; height about eighteen inches. It being a little shorter than the American Beauty, consequently it can be planted in front of the American Beauty without hiding the flowers. This is the fiery red aster we have all wanted.

NOS. Pkt.,

15c; 2 for 25c. (6)

Lady Roosevelt

—Lady

Roosevelt with

its

distinct

Carmine Rose coloring introduces a new class. of asters. Its long period of blooming, its beautiful flowers, borne on long stems, make it one of the most valuable of its class. If you want the best aster in vour neighborhood, something that cannot be equalled by others, plant the Lady Roosevelt and Pkt., 10c; 3 the other two varieties named on this page. Pkts., 25c; 1 Pkt., each of 3 above Novelty Asters, 35c.



With their long twisted in (7) Crego’s Giant Aster and out, curved petals they resemble the choicest of Japanese Chrysanthemums; flowers measuring four to .five inches in diameter; borne on long, strong stems, making them very suitable for cut flower purposes; flowers lasting from one week to ten days when cut and placed in water; blooming period August and September; height of plants, about two feet. We offer them in the following separate colors:

1, 3,

4, 5,

6

Giant Rose; Crego’s Giant Pink; Crego’s Giant Lavender; Crego’s Giant White; also Crego’s Giant Mixed. Any of the above, Pkt., 10c; 3 Pkts. for 25c. The earliest aster (8) Extra Early Hohenzoiiern Aster grown, earlier than Queen of the Market. Height, about twelve inches, branching and free flowering. Flowers measureabout two and one-half inches. Colors: Dark blue, white and pink. By planting this variety, you will add several Crego’s



weeks to the aster season.

Pkt., 10c.



This is by far the (9) Improved American Victoria Asters finest of all Asters for beds or borders where an even growth and a mass of flowers are wanted for effect; the sturdy upright plants, 12 to 14 inches high, carry not less than 50 flowers each, producing a mass of color unequalled by any other; blooms from early August till late October. Pkt., 10c.



Early American Beauty Aster The last sevwe have been offering the regular American Beauty which is an immense Aster, beautiful color, resembling the famous American Beauty rose as to size and color. The regular American Beauty is mid-

(10) eral years

season or later, while this new Early American Beauty blooms with the Queen of the Market and the Extra Early Hohenzollern. For continuous bloom of

this

immense

Aster,

you

should plant both the regular and the Early American BeauPkt., 20c; 2 for 35c. ties.

Chas. A. Morrill, Scottsbluff County, Nebr.

June

13, 1924. I received yours enclosing check for overcharge, for which I wish to thank you. All of the stock I have received this year came in I will not fine condition. lose to exceed one dozen plants out of the four hun-

dred Privet, and it is making a good looking Hedge. We have the most beautiful flower garden in the City and it all comes from Gurney’s. The stock I purchased for the County thus year is doing

fine.

1866— HOUSE OF GURNEY,

YANKTON,

S.

D.— 1925

49

Centaurea



Centaurea imperials The bushes are about four feet high and covered with large, sweet-scented flowers. Will keep for over a week in water if cut when just about to open. Pkt., 10c. Corn Flower The Blue Bottle, or Bachelor’s Button, is one of the most attractive of all hardy annuals, with its graceful beauty of its oldfashioned flowers. Colors include dark, light blue, pink, rose and white. Pkt., 10c; oz., 35c.



Calliopsis

A

very showy border plant, producing flowers in nearly every shade and brown. Finest mixed, pkt., 5c. Calliopsis Nana Compacta Gold Star Star-shaped, eight petals. Outer points bright yellow, main part maroon. Exceptionally free bloomer. Petals quilled, grows about six ipches high. Especially good for borders Pkg., 15c. or designs. Cosmidium Orange Crown A very beautiful bright yellow flower, similar to the Calliopsis. Very excellent for cut flowers, very easily grown and should be added to all annual collections. Pkg., 10c. Golden Wave Calliopsis The Calliopsis is one of the easiest grown, most abundant producers of brilliant flowers for all sections of the country. Golden Wave derives its name from the immense number of flowers borne on long stems that move with the breeze like the waves of the ocean. Pkg., 10c. of yellow, orange, crimson, red









Calendula Hardy annuals about one foot high, that produce a wonderful profusion of flowers, ranging in color from ivory to orange. Valuable for bed and borders. Bloom until late fall. Choicest mixed. All colors. Pkt., 10c.

CENTAUREA

Early Flowering Cosmos This new class of extra early, mammoth, flowering Cosmos, producing beautiful flowers, measuring four to five inches across, 60 days from sowing of the seed, allow us not only the beauty and pleasure of the Late Cosmos, but gives us a better flower; produces its flowers on wonderfully long. stems, which Cut the flowers as fast are used extensively for cut flowers. as they open on the plants and their place will be taken by others for a lon 0 bloomin 0 period. ,



— —

Double Cosmos This very popular flower of the early and as I saw is now produced in the double in the big fields this summer they were the peer

flowering type

them growing

of the big singles, borne on long stems, early in the season lasting until frosts makes them very desirable. Colors: Red,

Pink, White.

Pkt., 15c.

One

pkg. each color, 25c.



White Lady Lenox This gigantic Cosmos is a forerunner of an entirely new race; it is of extraordinary size and beauty, the flowers measure 4 to 5 inches in diameter, which is three times larger than the ordinary. Color, an Pkg., 10c. absolutely pure white. Pink Lady Lenox, description same as for White Lady Lenox, with the exception the color is a beautiful shell pink, lighting up beautifully at night. Per Pkg., 10c. Crimson Lady Lenox. Per pkg., 10c. One each of the White, Crimson and Pink Lady Lenox, 25c. Giant Flowering Cosmos— Pkt., 5c. Mixed Cosmos— Pkt., 5c.

Candytuft Seed sown in autumn proAll the varieties look best in beds or masses. duces flowers in early spring. When sown in April, flowers from July to Sepannual, 1 foot. comes. Hardy tember, and some of the sorts till frost Empress, or Snow Queen A complete mass of large snow-white flowers. Pkt., 10c; oz., 30c. Dark Crimson We all know the Candytuft, the white variety, and love This new dark crimson variety produces it for the beautiful borders it makes. largest racemes of flowers of a beautiful dark crimson and makes a wonderful 30c. 10c; oz., Pkt., border.





Candytuft Giant Hyacinth

—The

little

Candytuft we have known for

many years and used for border purposes is being superseded by this pure white giant. Flowers are grown compactly on stems about eight to ten inches Borne in abundance. Pkg., 15c. high. Candytuft Rose Cardinal All of the Candytuft we have known have the white variety. In inspecting the fields of flower seed, we found of been this cardinal-flowered candytuft, and it is a wonderfully beautiful flower, growPkg., 15c. the right height for bedding purposes. Very desirable. about ing so



Cigar Plant



Cigar Plant'(Cuphua Mineata New Hybrid) This is not the little cigar plant that is ordinarily grown in the greenhouse, but the one producing thousands of the little cigar-shaped flowers, growing easily anywhere and blooming all summer. Pkg., 10c.

Sam Krohn, Pine County, Minn. The nursery stock we received from you

May 23, 1924. this Spring is fine and I want to send you hearty thanks for the liberal quantity I received and want to congratulate you on the strong root system. Mrs.

my

CANDYTUFT ROSE

1866

50

— HOUSE

OF GURNEY, YANKTON,

D.— 1925

S.

Wild Cucumber rapid growing vine in existence. It will make a growth of 50 feet in a single season and will cover unsightly places quicker than anything else you can plant. It is an excellent shade Pkt., 5c; oz., 15c. houses or to train over trellis or porches. for summer

The most

Cannas

Extra Choice Mixed flowered type.

Blooms

from 20 varieties — Seed savedweeks after planting.

very best of the large or Gladiolus Pkt., 10c; oz., 35c.

of only the

in about ten

Coboea Scandens A rapid growing vine with beautifully

cut foliage producing large quantities of bell-shaped flowers

Pkt., 10c.

of a beautiful violet hue.

Giant Crimson Empress MaxDwarf plants bearing mambright cockscomb and bronze foliage, making it one of the most



ima

moth

attractive of all the Cockscombs. Pkt., 10c.

Cockscomb

Dwarf Nana) showy

(Cristata

—Low

growing plants with Choice mixed. combs.

jg:

WILD CUCUMBER

Pkt., 10c.

Chinese Woo! Flower— This recent novelty is the most curious as well as the most showy of all Celosias. The round globular flowers, appearing like large balls of bright red wool, start blooming in July and continue until cut down by frost. The flowers do not fade but increase in size and brilliancy throughout the season. They are excellent for bedding or specimen plants. Height, 2 to 3 feet. Pkt., 10c.

—A

Ostrich Feather (Celosia Plumosa) beautiful feathered Celosia, producing large bright crimson and orange plumes. A packet of each with the taller for the center and the dwarf for the outer edge would make a beautiful bed.



Tall Mixed, 3 feet. Pkt., 10c.

Pkt., 10c.

Dwarf

—Mixed, 114



feet.

Castle Gould A distinct type of Celosia Plumosa literally clothed from base to summit with immense feathered heads. Pyramidal growth, two to three feet high; the profusion of long continued bloom being remarkable. The colors are blood red, carmine yellow, golden orange, scarlet and wine

Mixed.

red.

CANNAS

Pkt., 10c.

Cardinal Climber (Epomea Quamoclit Hybridal of the finest annual climbers. Very graceful and beautiful, growing rapidly, it reaches a height of twenty feet; densely clothed with laciniated, rich green leaves. The numerous clusters of fiery scarlet, tubular spear-shaped flowers resemble the cypress vine, but are much larger, often^measuring one and one-quarter inches across. Pkg., 15c, postpaid.

One

'

Cineraria

A

beautiful class of plants for spring decoration;

may

also be planted out in

summer. They grow from 12 to IS inches high, and are completely covered with a mass of flowers, two and three inches across, of the richest colors, in white, blue, violet and crimson shades. Grandiflora (Large flowered). Mixed. Pkt., 25c.

C°l eus

JhR /jaBT MFr

-**7^38

I fflaMB ;

A beautiful class of well known and popular decorative foliage plants. For bedding or pot culture. Choicest New Hybrids. (Mixed). Pkt., 25c. Coleus Bed

|

—In

a Port-

g '

Oregon, park, land, this picture was taken by us on our Western of the

one

many

Portland

g

It is

trip.

SfH'

fir

frr

JaMBaf!

Wf

y "

beds made in the parks with the beautiful

!

|m

l;,

These plants are of many Coleus. CO beautiful colors and a package of the sePci wil1 P r cluce many plants of bright, beautiful ? 'Tis a pleasure to watch them grow and foliage. develop. Select the most beautiful ones in the fall before frost for pot culture; easily grown.

Clematis A very fine hardy climber; leaves bright and glossy green; flowers small and hawthorne scented, and just covering the plant when in bloom. Excellent for covering trellises or fences. Hybrids Mixed

—Attractive shades of purple,

lavender, white, etc.

(<£/ *>/

FSOM rm

Pkt., 10c.

YX CHINESE

WOOL FLOWER

1866

— HOUSE

OF GURNEY, YANKTON,

D.

S.

— 1925

51

Carnation The Carnation has always been one of the most esteemed of the florists’ collection, and there is no flower more desirable for the garden. Sow under glass and when of sufficient size transplant one foot apart each way. Half-hardy perennial, 1 Vi feet. Extra Choice Double Mixed Seed saved from the choicest German and English stocks. A large portion of this Seed will produce double flowers. Pkt., 15c. Marguerite Very free flowering. Will be in full bloom in four months after sowing, flowering in profusion until checked by frost. They flourish well in open ground. It is many shades of red, pink, white, variegated. Mixed pkt., 10c.





Cypress Vine A

most beautiful

vine, with delicate fern-like foliage and rose, scarlet and white flowers.

beautiful star-shaped Pkt., Sc; oz., 30c.

Chinese Lantern

Carnation

A showy variety of Winter Ground Cherry, 18 to 24 inches high and producing large, balloon-like fruits, changing from green to bright crimson as the season advances. Husk covering the fruit measures nearly 2 inches through, the fruit about three-fourths of an inch through and excelIt bears fruit at every lent for eating or for preserving. leaf bud, late in the season is a solid mass of crimson. Hardy perennial, roots living over winter in the ground. Pkt., 15c.

cypress

^

VINE*

Chrysanthemum The annual Chrysanthemums are distinct from the autumn flowering, blooming all summer and making a gorgeous display. Annua! Double White Snowball A magnificent variety



growing about 18 inches high and blooming continuously throughout the summer. They are covered with clusters of double pure white flowers of a beautiful fringed appearance. Will last a week or

two

after being cut.

Pkt., 10c.

Annua! Double and Single Mixed single types in a

wide range

of colors.



Beautiful double and Pkt., 10c.

Chrysanthemum —The Sultan — Commonly known as Painted Daisy. An annual plant growing about twenty inches high, exceptionally free bloomer

and

easily grown.

Pkg., 10c.

Blue Bell



Canterbury Bell (Campanula medium) Blue bell, handsome, easily grown herbaceous plants of stately branching habit and profuse blooms for beds and backgrounds. They produce long racemes of strikingly effective bell-shaped or saucer-shaped

A

hardy biennial. flowers of rich color. Sow seed early in spring. In the fall should be transplanted or thinned to eighteen inches or two feet apart and given some protection in severe winter weather. Height, two to four feet. Pkt., 10c.

Gurney’s Selected Calendula



One of the surest annuals, easy to grow and literally covers itself with large double yellow flowers about two to three inches across. One of the best for cut flowers as they last after cutting,, often as many as ten days, then the more you cut the better they bloom. For cut flowers, cut as soon as open, to Pot Marigold

keep plants blooming over a very long period, cut flower stems as soon as flowers fade. These plants are also called “Pot Marigolds” as they resemble the marigold, and respond beautifully to pot culture in the home in winter or summer, very hardy annual, Pkt., 10c. height about eighteen inches.

CHRYSANTHEMUMS Coreopsis

Grandiflora—P One

hardy perennial

of the finest

Bright

plants.

yellow

flowers,

which bloom from June until Pkt., 10c ;J/4 ©z., 25c.

frost.

Cowslip (Primula Veris)



Quite disInvincible Giant from the ordinary Cowslip, both in stronger growth of the plant and in the massive flowers, which are borne on stout stems 12 to 15 inches high. The colors range from pure yellow and orange to the deep-

tinct

est scarlet

and crimson.

Viola Shreffler, Nov.

Pkt., 20c.

Hand Coun-

5, 1924. received the Peony roots in excellent condition. I am well satisfied with the goods that I ordered.

ty, S. D. I

CHINESE LANTERN

1.866

52

— HOUSE

OF GURNEY, YANKTON,

S,

D.

— 1925

Dahlia

The New Cactus — One

of the finest flowers of late introduction, and where known is rapidly standard Dahlias. Flowers are quilled and curved, resembling Chrysanthemums; grown on long stems, which makes them especially valuable for cut flowers. Our seed Pkt., 15c. is all saved from the newest and most perfect varieties.

taking the place of the old

Digitalis, or

Foxglove

are quite stately and highly ornamental plants when well grown, with flower stems at least three feet in height. They are fine for the mixed border or planted singly in halfshady places near a walk or drive. The racemes of flowers are often two feet in length, containing scores of the prettily spotted thimble-shaped flowers. Perfectly hardy. Sow seed in spring in the Mixed varieties, pkt., 10c. Perennial. garden and transplant as desired.

The Foxgloves

•>

Daisy, Beilis Perennis

A

blooming plant. Sow seed early in hot-bed or house and transplant to rich, shaded situation, though they do quite well in open sunshine. Half-hardy, per-

favorite spring

cool, partially ennial, Yz foot.

Double Mixed. Choice. Pkt., 10c. Shasta Daisy (Alaska) Hardy perennial. A bed of these giant white Daisies in full bloom The flowers measure 3 J4 to 4 inches across and are borne on stems 18 inches' is a sight worth seeing. to 2 feet long. The numerous long, slender-stemmed white flowers rise most gracefully amid the bed of green, blooming all through the spring and summer months. The flowers keep in water for two weeks. With slight winter pro-



tection of straw' or litter

they

w’ill

live

and bloom

I have at my plants more than five years old producing hundreds of flowers more than three inches in diameter, a veritablesnowdrift at blooming time. Blooming period about six weeks. Of the manv varieties the Alaska is best

for years.

home

DIGITALIS

OR FOXGLOVE

bloomer and hardiest. Seed may be started in the house or hot beds, transplanted to the open for early flowers; they may also be sowed in the open. Blooms first season. Pkt., 10c. Golden Orange Daisy, African This flow'er is from South Africa and is the easiest grown of any of the showy border plants. It growls to a height of about fifteen inches and blooms profusely all summer. Seeds planted in the open ground in early May were flowering in July and continued until frost came. In our trial ground it was the most attractive flower of any shown there; the flowers are about two and one-half inches across and the most beautiful golden orange color. We recommend this specially for borders and along walks. Pkt., 10c.



SKASTA DAISY, ALASKA Dianthus, Pink Heddewegia For brilliancy of coloring and markings, as w ell as beautiful forms of flowers, this family cannot be surpassed. The colors range through white, pink and crimson to the very deepest maroon; many varieties are finely fringed. Hardy biennials, but are better treated as annuals, as they bloom early from seed sown in the spring. Fancy mixed. Pkt., 10c. Dianthus Chinese or Indian Pinks Hardy biennials; bloom early from seed; extra double flowers in choicestpmixture of bright single colors, variegated and spotted. One of the finest for massing in beds. r





Pkt., 10c.

Dianthus Nobslss— This is of the Royal pinks, covering a range and dark crimson shades, with dark eyes, petals double and Very compact bushes, living for two seasons. Flowers

of rose, pink laciniated.

Pkg., 15c. Dianthus Laciniated SpEendens This is the hardy garden pink, with the petals laciniated so that it is a waving mass of beautiful colored exceptionally large.



flowers blooming from early summer until late in the fall and living through to the next year for another season of unrivalled flowering, Pkg., 15c.

Escholtzia Burbank’s Crimson Flowering



This was raised by selection for nine years from one of our common California “Poppies,” which showed a thread of crimson on the inside of one of the petals. The plants grow about one foot high and a foot or more across. Pkt., 10c. Golden West A grand strain of the well-known favorite California Poppies. The flowers have large, overlapping petals, which are often delicately waved at the edges, showing beautiful and varied forms. The color is an intense shining yellow, with an orange blotch. Hardy annual. Pkt., 5c; oz., 25c.



Four o’Clock, Marvel of Peru A handsome, free-flowering, half-hardy perennial, blooming the first season from Seed. The flowers, which are produced in clusters, open in the afternoon and wither the next morning. They can be kept like Dahlias. Our mixture contains a fine varietv of colors. Pkt., 5c; oz., 20c; y4 lb., 60c. Gypsophila, or Babies’ Breath The flowers are small, star-like and borne on feathery sprays, which are highly esteemed for cut flowers, as they lend a most graceful effect when combined with Sweet Peas or Nasturtiums in bouquets. Pkt., 10c.

Hibiscus or Mallow Shrub-like plants growing from four to six feet high and bearing bright colored flowers varying from three to five inches in diameter. Perfectly hardy and therefore excellent for mass planting -with shrubbery. Pkt., 10c. Affine background for any garden.

Heliotrope Highly valued for the fragrance of their flowers and duration of bloom. -Tender perennial, .one foot. Easily grown from seed, blooming the firsf'sumTner if -sown -early. Lemoine’s Giant Hybrid. Choice mixed. Pkt., 15c.

DIANTHUS

1866

— HOUSE

OF GURNEY, YANKTON,

Everlasting or Eternal Flower These are of the most beautiful colors, pink, white, red, They bloom on good, strong stocks, standyellow, lavender. ing & to 4 feet high and are as beautiful as any of the annuals you can have. Cutting these just as the buds commence to open, retaining their delicate colors perfectly and remain beauThese are the genuine everlasting tiful for several years.

S.

D.— 1925

53

—Helichrysum

flowers. Plant liberally of these. Cut large quantities of the just opening buds and retain them for the holidays and for special occasions. Add a few green fern leaves or Plumosus fronds and you will have most beautiful bouquets for all

occasions.

Mixed

Pkt., 10c.



Firebali A beautiful flower glistening in the sunshine like a burning Pkt., 10c. Golden Globe A beautiful branching plant covered continuously during the summer; flowers of golden yellow. The waxy finish makes them shine as though varnished. Pkt., 10c. Silver Globe— This is a variation from the white eternal flower as it has a grayish shiny cast of silver; a wonderful bloomer holding its color indefinitely. Pkt., 10c; 1 each of above, 30c. coal.



I

Japanese Variegated

Hop

Where an

attractive climber is desired that will stand rough usage nothing better. The leaves are strikingly variegated; the first color is bright deep green, distinctly marked and blotched with silvery white tinged with yellow; now and then a leaf will be almost snowy white, and another one, almost pure green. A strong grower 20 to 30 feet in a few weeks’ time; not injured by heat or insects. Sow early in May. Fkf., 10c; 3 pkts. for 25c.

there

is



Hardy Perennial Sunflowers



Mixed Contains the finest single-flowering hardy perennial sorts. Seeds sown early will produce flowering plants the first year; as subjects for the hardy border as well as for cutting they are of great value. Pkt., 15c.

Helianthemum (Rock, or Sun Rose)



Mufabile Exceedingly pretty low growing, evergreen plants, forming broad clumps, and which during their flowering season, July to September, are quite hidden by a mass of bloom; well adapted for the front of the border, the rockery, or a dry, sunny bank. Choice mixed varieties. Pkt., 10c.

HELICHRYSUM, OR EVERLASTING FLOWER

Forget-Me-Not blue flower succeeds best in damp, shady situations, but will thrive in almost any soil. The Vie-

This charming

toria Blue which we offer is the largest flowering, to bloom the longest of any. Pkt., 10c.

little

and continue

Hunnemannia (Giant Yellow Tulip Poppy, or Bush Eschscholtzia) Fumariaefolia This is by far the best of the poppy family for cutting, remaining in good condition for several days. Seed sown early in May will, by the middle large buttercup-yellow poppy-like of July, produce plants covered with their blossoms and never out of flower until hard frost. The plants grow about 2 feet high, are quite bushy, with beautiful feathery glaucous foliage. V4 oz., 25c; pkt., 10c.



Humulus (Japanese Hop)

—A

very ornamental and fast growing climbing plant. The foliage resembles in shape that of the common Hop, is very dense, and in color a lively green;

Japonicus

annual.

Vi oz., 25c.

Iris

(Flowering Flag)



Iris) The seeds we offer have been saved from our own Blooms unrivalled collection, and should produce only varieties of the highest merit. the second year from seed. oz., 30c; pkt., 10c.

Kaempferi (Japanese

%

Hollyhock Mammoth

Fringed Hollyhock, Allegheny

are from 4 to 6 inches across, single, finely fringed

and ruby red, crimson and maroon. Choice mixed, pkt., 10c.

—The flowersColors

of this

and

curled.

The blooming season

Hollyhock

is

grand variety

shell pink, rose frost.

from June until

—Double

stateliest of all flowers growing to a height of six feet and taller and covered have improved this old large, brilliant colored flowers in various forms.

The

We with garden favorite until they are the highest and best type yet developed. Colors ranging from white and apricot, rose, cerise and crimson to the darker shades of wine, maroon and black. Our strains will surely please you. Every garden should have some of these majestic flowers. Pkt. 10c; oz., 35c.

Hyacinth Bean



(Dolichos Lablar) This photograph is taken at the South Dakota Hospital It' shows one of the men’s buildings with the beautiful Hyacinth Bean nearly- covering the front of it. Makes one of the most desirable climbing vines, grows rapidly, produces. clusters of beautiful flowers and then covers itself with the bright pods. for the Insane.

I want to say that all of the buildings at the Hospital are as well cared for and made just as beautiful as this one. The grounds are kept equally well and the w hole institution is a credit to the United r

States.

Splendid climbers abundant clus-

with

tered spikes of purple

and white flowers. It is of rapid growth and often runs 30 feet in a Height, 10 to season. 20feet. Tender annual. Pkt., 10c; oz., 25c.

HYACINTH BEAN

FORGET-ME-NOT

1866

54

— HOUSE

OF GURNEY, YANKTON,

S.

D.

— 1925

Geranium When properly grown, the constant succession of bloom until (Pelargonium.) frost comes, the brilliant colors of the flowers and the exquisite zone or horseshoe markings of the leaves of some of the varieties, render the Geranium very desirable for pot culture as well as for bedding out of doors and for growing in window boxes. Sow in a pot or box in the house in rather light soil, preferably containing a little Keep as near 65° F. as possible. Water moderately, and as leaf mold and sand. soon as the third leaf appears, pot in two-inch pots. Plunge the pots or set in open They will blossom the succeeding border, and on approach of frost remove to cover. spring.



Scarlet Mixed (Zonale) Tbe seed we offer will produce a large percentage double flow ers in many beautiful shades. Pkt., 25c.

oi

T

Godetia These wonderfully beautiful annuals have been developed and improved sc rapidly within the last few years that you would hardly recognize them comparing them with those of previous introduction. These new plants and flowers resemble the high priced imported Azalea, but, unlike the Azalea, continue to bloom for a number of months in succession. They are compact, pyramidal, and globe shaped plants covered with beautiful flowers of varied colors, the flowers measuring aboul two to three inches across and of the most dazzling crimson. 10c per Pkt.

Gaillardia Or Blanket Flower

The flowers are greatly admirec single mixed. —FinestThey Targe single thrive well anywhere.

for their rich blending of colors. in red, scarlet, yellow and orange.

flower,-

Pkt., 5c; oz. f 20c.

GAILLARDIA New Double

Gaillardia

useful for cutting.

The

—Large bright-colored double

colors

Orange, Amaranth and Claret.

Gourds

—A

embrace

Sulfur,

Golden,

flowers,

Y ellow

Pkt., 10c; oz.» 25c.

Gourds

tribe of climbers, with curiously shaped fruit in Being of rapid growth, they are fine to cover old fences, trellises, stumps, etc. Do not plant the Seed till the danger of frost is over, and select rich mellow ground. Tender annual climbers, 10 to 20 feet. Fine mixed, pkt., 5c; oz., 15c. Calabash Pipe Gourd A rapid growing climbing annual from South Africa. The very popular Calabash Pipes are made from the When grown to make pipes it is best to let the vines run on fruit. the ground like cucumbers. These pipes are very light and color,

various colors.



nicely.

Pkt., 15c.

Nest Egg Gourd

— Pkt., 10c.

MIXED GOURDS Martin N. Peterson, St. Croix County, Wise. Sept. 2G, 1923. I want to let you know how well satisfied I am with the nursery stock purchased from you last Spring. All of the apples, crab apples and plum trees grew; many of them more than one and one-half feet this year.

The

Trial

Ground Gladiolus were wonderful. One

cream colored blossom measured 6 V2 inches

across.

Donald Overbeck, Clayton County, Iowa. This is a photograph of the pumpkins raised by Donald OverThey are so large they make a good barricade for the front,

beck.

Ice Plant Handsome plant edgings.

with ice

steps.

These were raised on the Ben F. Overbeck place at Luana, Iowa.

for baskets, rock work, vases

and

Leaves and stems appear as though covered crystals; easily grown. Pkt., 10c.

Double Sunflower



Helianthus, or Double Sunflower Double Chrysanflowered. This variety grows about 6 feet high, and

themum

bears profusely all summer long. The perfectly double flowTers are bright yellow and of many different sizes, from 3 to 6 inches in diameter. A row of these across our trial grounds this summer attracted great attention. Pkt., 10c; oz., 20c.

C. W. Price, Spirit Lake, Iowa. Nov. 12, 1924. The three hundred Tulip and Peony bulbs for the Cemetery Society arrived all O. K. The bulbs are fine and the ladies well pleased with them. Thank you for the liberal count. We appreciate it.

N. E. Keyes, Hennepin County, Minn. Apr. 7, 1924. Bulbs and roots came today. They are very fine quality and surely satisfactory. Many thanks.

Ornamental Grasses The ornamental Grasses

serve the double purpose of rendering the mixed flower-bed or border attractive during the summer and for the use of the spikes or panicles in a dried state in winter bouquets. For large beds or groups on lawns nothing gives a finer effect, and they are now largely used in prominent position in many of the finest public parks, etc. The following are the most popular varieties: IBriza Maxima (Quaking Grass)grass bouquets. Pkt., 5c.

—In



great

Cosx Lacbrymae (Job’s Tears) Broad, and hard, shining pearly seeds; annual. Per

demand

for

corn-like leaves oz., 20c; pkt.,

Sc.



Eulalia Zekrirsa (Zebra Grass) Light green, barred -with -white. Variegation runs across foliage. Pkt., 10c. Gynerium Argenteurra (Pampas Grass) White silvery plumes; perennial; blooms the second season Pkt., 16c.

creamy





Penrcisetum Longistylum Extremely graceful greenish-white plumes; excellent for beds; annual; 2 feet. V4 oz., 30c; pkt., 10c. Rueppelianum (Purple Fountain Grass) Graceful green foliage and purplish plumes, unequaled as an edging to a bed of Cannas or other tall plants; annual; 3 feet. (See cut.) Per y4 oz., 30c; pkt., 10c. (Jniola Latifoiia (Spike Grass) A pretty native perennial variety, with very ornamental graceful drooping panicles; 3 to 4 feet. Pkt., 10c. Collection of Grasses 8 varieties, noted above. Pkt., each kind, 50c. Zea, Maize Japonica A dwarf growdng, fine leaved, white and green striped corn, resembling the old ribbon grass, but more beautiful and should be used liberally in the flower garden or with the ornamental grasses. This is a very attractive plant; grows anywhere. Pkt., 10c.





— —

1866

— HOUSE

OF GURNEY, YANKTON,

S.

Ipomea,

D,

— 1925

Moon

Flowers

Tender annuals of rapid growth, with beautiful and varied flowers; for covering old walls, trellises, arbors or stumps of trees they are invaluable; 15 to 20 feet. Heavenly Blue Flowers, 4 to 5 inches across in large clusters, produced in such abundance as to nearly hide the foliage; color a beautiful sky blue. Pkt., 15c. Mixed, including blue, red and white. Pkt., 10c.



'

—A

Ipomea Mikado new Japanese climbing vine, producing flowers measuring from 4 to 5 inches across, in the greatest variety of colors. The leaves are large, glossy dark green, and will grow to the height of 20 feet in a very short time. Pkt., 10c. Ipomea Bona Nox This is the Goodnight or Evening Glory. Flowers very large, violet; commence opening in mid-afternoon and remaining open all night. Pkt., 10c.



Japanese

Kudzu Vine

The most remarkable climbing vine by everyone for dense shade of

planted

of the age and should be porches, arbors, or places

where you wish to screen outbuildings. It comes from Japan, the land of the flowers and of the most curious vegetable productions. The blossoms are large and borne in pinnacles like Wistaria, much larger in size and better clusters. Color, purple; blossoms very freely and early. It requires but little care and its hardy nature commends it to all. Large pkt., 10c; 1 oz., 35c.

Lupinus





Mixed Deep blue Texas Lupin Loveliest spikes of deepest sea blue flowers, delicate fragrance, easily grown and very satisfactory. Pkt., 10c.

MOON FLOWER —

Kochia, or An

Summer Cypress

grown annual about 3 feet high. Throughout the suma beautiful green, but turns to a bright red in autumn. It is of perfectly rounded form, with very fine foliage and stems. Is used for ornamental exhibits or borders. Pkt., 10c.

Lily of the Valley- Very small and sweet and dainty the creamy white escalloped bells pendant along slender stems. They make up (with their broad shiny leaves) into dainty bouquets of fragrance. They spread actively from the roots and soon reclaim shaded, cold ground which otherwise would be cheerless and barren. Pkt., 15c.

mer

;

easily

it is

Lobelia

— Crystal Palace

A most excellent and useful plant for bedding. Compact, erect growth flowers deep blue. Seed should be covered lightly. Pkt., 10c a ;

Lychnis



Chalcedonica, or Burning Star One of the greatest hardy biennials, which grow and bloom year after year, requiring no protection Pkt., 10c. Color, brilliant scarlet. easily started.

and

Linnum

or Scarlet Flax

One of the most showy annuals for flower beds and masses. Brilliant crimson-scarlet flowers, 1 inch across, borne in wonderful profusion. Pkt., 5c; oz., 25c.

Delphinium Larkspur, Annual Varieties The branching varieties grow two feet high, and should The annual varieties are very free bloomers eighteen inches apart. and produce large spikes of flowers, w'hite, pink, rose, light blue, dark In some varieties the flowers are double, in others blue and violet. The beautiful plume-like foliage is very ornamental. single. Double Rocket One foot in height, mixed colors. Pkt., 10c.



Delphinium True Perennials Delphinium Chsnensis (Azure Fairy)—This is the best of all of the Delphinium, blooming very early, branching very close to the ground Pkg., 15c. of azure blue flowers. Delphinium Hardy Larkspurs Bloom freely the first year from In trial are the most showy of any of the our grounds, these seed. flowers for the longest period during the first season. The flowers vary They are borne on in shade from light lavender to the deepest blue. spikes eighteen inches to three feet high and are excellent cut flowers. The advantage of this hardy Delphinium is that whenyouplantthemyou have them for several years. They come up and bloom early in the Pkt., 10c; 3 pkts., 25c. Spring. and producing long fronds





Mrs. R. H. Wolf, Cottonwood County, Minn. Apr. 21, 1924. We received the shipment of nursery stock which you sent to replace those lost in transit. We wish to sincerely thank you for the fine way you have acted in this matter, and shall order from you when

we need more. Mrs. E. Roberts, Carter County, Mont.

We

all I

are

C.

May 3,

1924.

received the nursery stock in fine condition. It is planted and growing fine. wish to thank you for the extras you put in. They

much

Primrose Primula Primroses are charming plants which blossom freely during the spring and winter. They are of easy culture and should be sown from March to May and again in July to August for a succession of bloom. All make splendid pot plants and some blossom freely out of doors even during the winter. Giant Flowered The beautiful Fringed Chinese and Obconica Grandiflora are large flowered, bloom freely for several months and are one of the very best house plants. We offer only the best seed. Giant Flowered Mixed Pkt,, 25c.





Mignonette

appreciated.

Van Natta, Iroquois County, III. Jan. 14, 1924. me the 1924 catalog. I ordered Sapa, Opata and

Send

Waneta

KOCHIA

you and the next year after planting, I picked one bushel of plums from two Sapa and one Opata and had twenty-five immense Wanetas on one tree. I sold that place and bought another and wish to have more of these plums. trees of

Seeds of Mignonette may be sown at any season, so that a succession of flowers can be secured. Seeds sown early in the Very few garden will give flowers through the summer. cultivate the Sweet Mignonette compared with the many that might show their love for this sweet little flower. Annual. Sweet—Well-known fragrant. Pkt., 5c; oz., 25c.

Queen Anne Lace Flower Lathyrus Latifolius (Perennial Sweet Peas)





Lathyrus Latifolius (Perennial Sweet Peas) Hardy vines of robust growth resembling Sweet Peas, but the flowers are not fragrant. Blooms through a long season and are excellent as cut flowers. The plants die down in the fall and start growing from the roots early in spring. Height, six feet.

FINESTMIXED.

White/pink and rose. Pkt., 10c;

i/

4

oz.,50c.

“In ye olden days” the Queen Anne lace was the most delicate and beautiful, and Nature has done its best to reproduce the delicate figures and beautiful patterns in this The color is a charming, dainty baby blue. This flower. Queen Anne Lace flower is one of the best for cut flowers, and when made up in corsage or table bouquets with sprays of Gypsophalia or other dainty foliage, it will please the most exacting. -Easily grown; early and profuse bloomer,

Pkt., 10c.

1S66— HOUSE OF GURNEY, YANKTON,

56

S.

D.— 1925

Mourning Bride Scablosa or Sweet Scabious— An old-fashioned but most attractive flower. Its great abundance and long succession of richly colored, fragrant blossoms on long stems make it one of the most useful decorative plants of the garden. DesirFlower heads about two inches able for cutting as well as for beds and borders. across; florets double, surrounding the thimble-shaped cone, and giving a fancied resemblance to a pin-cushion. Seed may be sown in place as soon as ground can be worked; or for earlier blooming sow in hotbed early in spring and transplant one and one-half feet apart. Hardy annual; about two to two and one-half feet' high. Pkt., 10c.

Marigold The African and French Marigolds are valuable for their flowers in autumn, and can be grown to advantage in the little clumps with other plants in the front The African varieties are the taller in of shrubbery or in the garden border. growth, and produce large, self-colored blossoms. The French varieties are smaller, some of them, being elegantly striped and spotted. The dwarf-growing kinds adapt themselves to spots where the taller varieties would be unsuitable. They succeed best in a light soil, with full exposure to the sun. Annual. African Marigolds Mixed varieties. Pkt., 5c; oz., 40c. French Marigolds Mixed. Pkt., 5c; oz., 40c. Marigold Tagetes This is of the Pumila or miniature type, flowers bright orange, produced in abundance and extra fine for border work. Growing only about eight to ten inches high. Pkg., 10c. Marigold Golden Bali Brightest golden yellow flowers outcurved forming a perfect ball. One of the most satisfactory and easily grown annuals. Pkt., 10c. Marigold PalSida (Lemon Bail Description same as Golden Ball, except The two are very desirable for cut flowers. Pkg., 10c. it is lemon yellow.

— — —





)

Tall

Morning Glories

MORNING GLORY

Scarlet



Fine Mixed A great variety of colors of the popular oldfashioned Morning Glory. Fkt., 5c; oz., 15c. Imperial Morning Glory, Fancy Fringe Exceptionally large flowers, beautifully fringed and ruffled, contains all and many more colors than the ordinary Morning Glory. Per



Runner Beans



Scarlet Runners A great favorite in England and Europe, not only as an ornamental climber, but for the delicious edible beans which succeed the sprays of bright scarlet peashaped blossoms. Pkt., 5c; lb., 50c.

pkt., 10c.

Nasturtiums inspected the fields of Nasturtiums this summer when they were in full bloom; fields of more than ten acres in one body, a glowing, quivering mass of color. wife compared it to an immense velvet carpet. It was a wonderful sight and one that will not be forgotten. Small beds of Nasturtiums are equally as beautiful on a smaller scale. The Nasturtium is one of the flowers you should plant largely of; the dwarf fellows in the beds and borders and the tall fellows for covering fences, objectionable objects or low buildings. I

My

Tall or Trailing Nasturtiums These are

all of

strong, vigorous growth

for covering fences or trellis.

Golden Leaved Scarlet

and can be trained upon

—This exceptional and odd variety

is

strings or wires, or

outstanding

among

the

Nasturiums, on account of the contrast of the velvety, maroon flower against Pkt., 10c; oz., 25c; y4 ib., 60c. Sunlight Flowers of the largest size are most beautifully colored. Clear, rich golden yellow. In this you will find flowers measuring nearly three inches across and are produced most profusely. Pkt., 10c; oz., 20c; y4 lb., 45c. Midnight Plants of extremely deep dark green foliage, flowers are a deep brownish red. The soft, velvety texture of petals is crumpled or partly folded. Pkt., 10c; oz., 20c; varieties of

the golden yellow foliage.





i/

4 8b., 45c.

MARIGOLD (GOLDEN BALL)

Dwarf

or



Ruby Flowers of exceptional size and of deep rosy red, changing to lighter rosy pink. 60c. beautiful variety. Pkt., 10c; oz., 25c; V4 Tall Mixed Including all of the above and hundreds of other varieties. Pkt., 10c; oz., 15c; 1/4 lb-, 40c; lb., $1.10. Tall Mixed For pickling. The tender seed pods with a portion of the stem attached make delicious pickles. They should be gathered while green, packed in a jar until filled and then covered with cider vinegar, brought to a boil and still warm. Extra large pkt., 10c; oz., 15c; y4 lb., 30c ;J1 lb., $1.00.

A

Tom Thumb

— —

Nasturtiums

These are dwarf, compact, rounded growth, and, like all Tom Thumbs, succeed on light, well-drained soil, or in slightly raised beds. The Tom Thumb Nasturtiums are much freer bloomers than any of the other varieties and are excellent for border plants.



King Theodors Dark foliage and flowers of a rich, velvety crimson. Pki., 10c; oz., 25c; y4 lb., 40c. Empress of India Deep purplish green leaves, flowers dark rich salmon-scarlet. Pkt., 10c; oz., 25c; y4 lb., 40c. Chameleon It is unique in bearing flowers of quite distinct colorings on one and the same plant. It is one of the most brilliant and showy of all the dwarf nasturtiums. Pkt., 10c; oz.,. 20c. Dwarf Pearl This is a very pleasing, creamy-white, free bloomer and a good plant. Pkt., 10c; oz., 20c. Vesuvius Flowers very large, finely formed and the broad petals are salmon rose, heavily veined with salmon orange. Foliage dark green. Very beautiful. Pkt., 10c; oz., 25c; y4 Eh., SOc. Queen of Thumbs These are the baby class of nasturiums. Form, neatly rounded, with beautiful variegated and marble leaves of silvery white. Flowers rich purple crimson, which show, to the greatest advantage against the background of silvery variegated leaves. Pkt., 10c; oz., 35c;









Tom

y4



lb., S5c.

Thumb

Torn Mixed—This mixture is composed of all of the best Tom is remarkable both for brilliancy of color and perfection of individual flowers. The low price at which we are offering this seed brings it within the reach of everyone, and it should be planted liberally. Pkt., 10c; oz., 15c; 1/4 ifo., 40c; Sis., $1.10.

Thumbs and

Pyrethrum (Golden This

Ball)

especially desirable for markings, borders or designs. Grows high, produces a wonderful quantity of small golden flowers, which makes it extra desirable for borders, etc. Pkg., 10c.

about

is

six inches

1866

— HOUSE

OF GURNEY, YANKTON,

D.— 1925

S.

57

Pansies most interesting classes of flowers grown. A bed of Pansies in bloom always has something new for you in variety of color and marking, every time you visit it. Are in bloom continuously from spring until late fall. The seed may be sown in the hot bed, in boxes Very best mixed. Fkt., 10c. in the house or in the open ground.

One

of the



Gurney’s Special Blend of Fancy Giant Pansies The indemand for the highest class of Pansies leads us to

creasing popular

blend of varieties that cannot be excelled, containing as does the' largest and most beautiful of all of the blotched, frilled and smooth, well formed and monstrous Pansies with a range of the color, covering all of Pansydom. offer y.ou this

it

The

texture of these flowers

is

heavy and velvety. The flowers are

stems which make them of exceptional value for cut flowers, lasting as they do for many days. They are especially fine for center pieces for tables when used in low dishes with plenty of the

borne on

Pansy

large, stiff

foliage.

To

secure the best results and the greatest number of flowers, they should be cut continuously from the time they commence blooming. They w ill then continue until freezing weather and often with a slight covering of straw will continue to bloom nearly through the Winter. These varieties are hardy, enough to withstand most Winters and commence blooming as soon as the ground is thawed in the Spring, producing immense quantity of not so large flowers the second year. T

The

seed of this Special

than the common, but i/s

Orchid-Flowered

distinct and beautiful strain will appeal to those who prefer delicate shades and soft tints of Includes orchid shades of chamois, pink, lilac, rose, coloring.

Pkt., 15c.

Lord Beaconsfield

Ultramarine blue, shaded with

violet,

gradually shading to a velvety white on the upper petals. Pkt., 15c.

Lord Baltimore— A fine.counterpiece

to President Carnot.

Rich golden yellow with pure shining black blotch.

Gurney Blend

worth

Special Strains Snow Queen — A

—This

orange, and lavender.

is

many

is

necessarily higher priced

times the difference.

Pkt., 30c

oz., $1.50; Vi oz., $2.50.

Pkt., 15c-

texture.

magnificent pure white, of size and heavy

Pkt., 15c.

The large is the latest in pansies. flowers have such a mass of substance that they are waved and beautifully ruffled on the edges. Pkt., 20c. Black King Large coal-black flowers of velvety texture. Pkt., 15c. Odier or Blotched, mixed. Pkt., 10c. Trimardeau Giant These include the best of the German Giant Pansies, ruffled edges and various colors. Pkt., 15e.

Masterpiece— This 1





Petunia For outdoor decoration few plants are equal to this. They commence flow ering early and continue a mass of bloom throughout the whole r

season, until late in the fall; easily cultivated.



Rosy Morn This is of the new dwarf glowing type, producing flow ers of a most beautiful shade of pink, continuous blooming from early in summer until freezing weather. Pkg., 15c. Single Grandiflora Choicest mixed seed, saved from show flowers. Very large. Pkt., 10c. Hybrida Striped Mixed— Pkt., 15c. Howard’s New Star—Each flower shows a large, distinct five-pointed white star on a bright crimson or purplish crimson ground. Late in the fall, when the weather becomes colder, the edges of the white star become feathery, with fine lines of rose and crimson, while on other flowers the entire white portion is suffused with soft rose The plants begin to bloom early and pink. Pkt., 15c. flower profusely. r



Balcony Petunias This type of single Petunias, although one of the best for general outdoor culture, is used most extensively for balconies, window boxes, hanging This strain begins bloombaskets, rockeries, etc. ing early in Spring and continues long after the Seems to be no limit to its ability to first frosts. flower, as it is one continuous mass of bloom. The more it is cut the more it blooms. Pkt., 10c»

ROSY MORN

—There

Portulaca or Moss Rose

scarcely any flower in cultivation that makes such a dazzling display of beauty as a bed of many-hued, brilliant-colored Portulacas. They thrive best in- a rather rich, light loam or sandy soil, and an exposed sunny situation. Single Mixed All colors. Pkt., 10c. Double Finest Mixed Flowers perfectly double, of the most brilliant scarlet, crimson, rose, white, yellow, etc. Pkt., 10c.

Moss Rose

is





Stocks, Gilly Flowers are generally cultivated, and bloom from 10 to 12 weeks sown; they grow from 6 to 18 inches high, and when grown in light, rich soil they bear an immense quantity of bloom, each plant forming a perfect bouquet oi delightful fragrance. Half-hardy annual. Double Giant Perfection Ten Weeks— Tall, late, flowering class. Choice

The Ten Weeks Stocks

after being

.

mixed. Pkt., 10c. Stocks, Bismarck Rose— Most of the stocks grow too tall and slender to be valuable in the Northwest gardens. This strain grows about' eighteen inches high, branches freely from the ground and produces quantities of blood red flowers with white eyes. If you have been unable to grow stocks previously satisfactorily, this Pkg., 15c. will surely be successful with you.

PETUNIA, ROSY MORN AND ELAINE, DAUGHTER OF J. C.

GURNEY

P 1866— HOUSE OF GURNEY,

58

YANKTON,

S.

D.

— 1925

Poppies, Annual This exceedingly showy and easily cultivated class of plants grows in any ordinary soil, and is among the showiest of all annuals. Sow the seed where the plants are intended to be grown. Shirley— Fine for cutting, cut in the morning while the dew is on. The colors range from bluish-white through many tints to bright crimMixed, 2'A feet. Pkt., 10c; oz., 25c. son.

and blooms

Mikado of Poppies.

—Very distinct in character and color from any other class The

flowers are brilliant scarlet

and white, with beautifully

curved petals like a Japanese Chrysanthemum.

— —

Pkt., 10c; oz., 25c.

Double Mixed Annual varieties. Pkt,,, 5c; oz., 20c. Single Mixed Annual varieties. Pkt., 5c; oz., 20c.

Poppy Peony Flowered ordinary peony.



These are immense bails as large as the Colors very clear white to flaming scarlet. Stands feet high and bloom over a period of about bed of these is one of the most desirable in the Pkg., 10c. :

about two and one-half four weeks. A annual garden.





Poppy American Legion Flanders Poppy A new sentiment has been created around a common flower of the fields the scarlet poppy. Immortalized in verse, in song, in picture, it now takes its proud place beside the more majestic blooms of the conservatory. All of us have a greater affection for the poppy after



J. D. McCrae’s “In Flanders Fields.” For garden cultivation in this country, poppies seem never to have been remarkably popular possibly because despite their prolificacy they are fragile flowers and wilt quickly when cut. Nevertheless, it is the

reading Lieut. -Col.



Schoolmaster’s humble guess that the poppy is destined to take a more prominent place in our affections and our gardens than in past years. The association with the Fields of Flanders would accelerate this popularity. This is the regular Flanders poppy that the boys who were over there saw in the fields. Plant a package of these for the boys who went across. Pkg., 10c.



PEONY FLOWERED



Poppies, Hardy-



New Hardy Perennials, Oriental Red This new race of Oriental Poppies, when once planted, continue blooming for several years without further trouble. The flowers often measure 6 inches across and are of the most intense brilliant red. Pkt., 20c.

Iceland Poppies (Papaver Nudicaule)

Hardy perennials, flower the first year from seed, blooming almost as quickly as the annual sorts. They are of graceful, neat habit, with bright green fernlike foliage, formed in tufts, from which issue slender stalks about 12 inches high, bearing their brilliant flowers in endless profusion. They remain evergreen throughout the winter, coming into bloom early the following spring. New Hybrid Iceland The latest development in this lovely species, varying in color from sulphur yellow through different shades of orange to chamois and salmony-rose, some of which are very striking. Pkt., 15c.



Saponaria (Bouncing Bet) Caucasica

—A

pieno (Double-flowering Bouncing Bet) hardy perennial sort with white tinted rose, double flowers, produced all summer and fall; 15 inches. Pkt., 10c. Vaccaria A pretty and useful annual variety, grows about 2 feet high, and bears masses of satiny pink flowers somewhat like an enlarged Gypsophila; charming for cutting, adding grace to any arrangement of Several sowings should be made to keep up a succession of flowers. bloom. Pkt., 5c; oz., 30c. flore



Peony Seed We gathered a quantity

of these seeds, more than we shall need for our own use in the production of new varieties. Peony seed, you understand, do not reproduce true to their parent, but produce different It is really worth varieties of flowers, single, semi-double and double. while watching them from year to year, and as new varieties are produced in this way, you might secure something better than any of the varieties They are very easily grown and bloom the second year after of today. Pkt., 15c; oz., 65c. planting.

Ricinus or Castor Bean The Ricinus has very ornamental

foliage

and beautiful showy

fruit.

Fine for the center of a bed, as it gives a magnificent semi-tropical appearance, or, planted thick, it makes a fine screen or hedge. Plant seed in open, very rich, deep-spaded ground, in a dry situation, as soon as safe in spring.

Cambodgensis stem nearly black;

—The

fruit

finest dark-foliaged Ricinus. Leaves maroon; Five feet. Pkt., 5c; oz.. 15c.

bronzy purple.

Platy codon (Chinese Bell Flower)

CASTOR BEAN,

13

ft.,

8

in.

high



Blooms from spring until Perennial plants with showy flowers. early fall. Height, one to two feet. Pkt., 10c. flowers. white and MIXED Blue FINEST



— HOUSE

1866

OF GURNEY, YANKTON,

S.

D.— 1925

59

Salvia, Scarlet Sage America (Large-Flowered Scarlet Sage)— Under our hot summer sun

this “flame-colored” beauty is the most gorgeous of all plants. For months the blaze of flaming scarlet is intensely brilliant with great spikes of bloom, completely concealing the foliage. single plant will carry as many as 200 spikes of flowers each ten inches long. Pkt., 15c. Salvia Volcano—Of all varieties of Salvia cultivated this is undoubtedly the most satisfactory and finest of them all. It grows about 20 inches high, pyramidal form, and is. a mass of extra long racemes of fiery red, trumpet-shaped flowers. It is the earliest Salvia of any. Seed planted in the open ground will bloom by July 1st and continue until frost. The plants may be taken up from the open ground before frost and wall bloom continuously in the house through the winter. It is easily grown from seed and comes true to name. For earlier flowers should be planted in a hot-bed and given same care as cabbage or tomatoes. not plant outdoors until danger of frost is over. Pk£„, 15c.

A

Do

Salpiglosis



Grartdifflora This has long been one of our Favorite Flowers, but has never attained the popularity to which it is entitled. Nature can only paint its colors. It is a splendid half-hardy annual, with flowers of a peculiar richness, very delicately and beautifully penciled. Very effective in the sunlight, which brings out the beautiful tints and veinings. Unsurpassed for cutting.

After visiting the large flower seed growing farms and comparing one flower with the other, there were a few that were more satisfactory than all the rest, and Salpiglosis is one of the best.

Grows p,bout three and

one-half feet high,

producing flowers nearly as large and about the shape of the Morning Glory, and comes in almost every color that one can imagine, deep blues, purples, crimson, yellow, white, etc. Mixed, pkg., 10c. Scarlet and Gold This is one of the most beautiful of the bright colored varieties of A beautiful scarlet flower with gold markSalpiglosis, selected from more than fifty varieties. Pkg., 15c. ings. Violet This flower is like the most beautiful piece of velvet cloth you can imagine. The Pkg., 15c. best of the darker colors.





Sweet William, Hardy Perennials The

best .varieties of Sweet William are of exceedingly beautiful colors, very large and Treatment as for Carnation. The plants are perperfect in form, with trusses of great size. fectly hardy, and may be increased by division of the roots. The colors pass from white to pink, crimson, carmine and purple, with distinct eye encircled out flowers. It is well to raise new plants every year from seed, for old plants become debilitated and unsightly, and the flowers decrease in size. Perfection (Auricula-Flowered) -Single varieties, mixed. Pkt., 10c. Dwarf Mixed These seldom grow over 6 to 8 inches high. Profuse bloomers; excellent Pkt., 10c. for borders or edging.







Violet



Sweet Violet Well known, old fashioned hardy garden and pretty blue and white flowers. Pkt., 10c.

violet; prized for their fragrance

Verbenas Very few plants will make such a gorgeous display during the summer months as the Verbenas, or furnish more flowers for cutting. Start seed early in the spring and transplant after 3 or 4 inches of growth. Good, healthy plants can be produced from seed as readily as almost any tender annual. They flower in July and continue until destroyed by frosts. Our stock today stands unrivaled. Auricula-Flowered, White Eyed Mixed colors. Pkt., 15c. Mixed Colors— Pkt., 10c. Scarlet Defiance Large trusses rich scarlet. Pkt., 15c. Verbena Lucifer—This is the most brilliaut scarlet of any of the Verbenas. Most of the scarlet ones have a white eye. Lucifer is entirely free from this. Free bloomer. Pkg., 15c





THE BEAUTIFUL GARDENS OF I

J.

A.

want you to note

this picture carefully. See the beautiful the annual and perennial flowers, the beautiful

evergreens, peonies blooming.

This

is

in northwest

the Canadian line and

is

North Dakota, only seven miles from as truly a home as though it were

SALPIGLOSIS

HOVLAND, FLAXTON, NORTH DAKOTA located in a tropical country where trees and flowers grow wild and naturally. All of you may have just as beautiful grounds as Mr. Bovland, if you will make the attempt; nqtjdiffieult-£d;^dl.

—— — ——— 1866 — HOUSE OF GURNEY, YANKTON,

60

S.

D.

— 1925

Phlox For a splendid mass of colors and a constant display that is not excelled by any other annual, commencing to bloom quite early and continuing until severe freezing. The Phlox colors range from purest white to blood-red or crimson. For masses of separate colors and for cutting for bouquets for vases are unsurpassed. The seed may be planted in the open ground May 1st or in hot-bed or house earlier, and afterwards transplanted to where wanted. Give good, rich ground and set plants 8 to 10 inches apart each way. Hardy annuals; 1 foot.



Phlox Drummonds, Grandiflora Large flowered section. These are decided improvements over the old class, with much larger flowers, a better range of colors and of more compact growth. Choice mixed,

all colors.

Pkt., 10c.



The most interesting of the Phlox family, bearing pretty star-shaped and fringed flowers, rich in colors, varying violet blue to deep rose and blood-red, margined with white. Starred and fringed; choice mixed. Pkt., 15c. Star-Shaped Phlox

from

Hardy Phlox

(Perennial)

No class of hardy plants is more desirable than the Perennial They will thrive in any position and be used to advantage Phloxes. in the hardy border, in large groups on the lawn, or planted in front of belts of shrubbery, where, by judicious pinching back and removing faded flowers, a constant succession of bloom may be had until Pkg., 15c. frost. E.

DRUMMONDI PHLOX

Beckley, Scott County, Karts. June 17, 1924. Three years ago, I purchased ten Waneta plum trees from you. I have had two crops, not scrub plums, but nice big The trees were just as full as your photograph shows them. I thought it would be impossible for trees to bear this way. This has never been much of a fruit country, but the Improved Hansen Plums have converted it. My neighbors want

EVi-

ones.

some

of these trees.

Sweet Peas

for 1925

to their best, the flowers should be cut every day, in the evening. By morning the vines will be entirely covered with the bright showy flowers. In visiting the fields of Sweet Peas we found almost thousands of varieties growing, most of the varieties producing very wonderful flowers, but we, by careful selection in the trial grounds, have decided on the varieties that we are listing here as the very best; every season improvement is made in Sweet Peas and the latest introductions are generally the best. are listing those that pleased us and we are sure they vail please you. The descriptions which we are giving will be found very accurate. have discontinued grandiflora varieties as they are no longer desirable.

the annual flowers, there are none that have come into popular favor over the entire world and have been improved so much in the last few years as the Sweet Peas, and it is marvelous the wonderful improvement that has been made in them. From a few ordinary colors of inferior small flowers they have, by careful selection and breeding, covered almost entire range of colors and have produced flowers measuring over 2]A, inches across, and from the old-fashioned straight-edged type they have produced the ruffled and the butterfly Sweet Peas. The most easily grown of any of the annuals, blooming from early summer until killed by the heavy autumn frosts. No other flower equals them for cutting and few last as well. To bloom

Of

all

We

We

$1.00 Spencer Collection 12 Pkts. of the Best Spencers for $1.00

Single Pkts., 12c; oz., 25c



Agricola A fine, large, white, slightly flushed lilac; very good Spencer form and pretty. 2. Constance Hinton A black-seeded, white Spencer of enormous size and fine Spencer form. Young flowers generally tinted a trifle pink. 3. Duplex Spencer Duplex cream pink, waved. 4. Helen Lewis Standard orange; wings rosy salmon, large, wavy; one of the earliest Spencers and still a favorite. 5. John Ingman Rosy carmine, showing veins ?f deeper shade. This variety and Helen Lewis were two of the first from Countess Spencer. 6. Tennant Spencer Rosy purple, self color; shows the tendency towards Magenta. 7. Marie Corelli Rose carmine, tinted cherry red; waved; brilliant rose carmine or red. 8. New Margaret Madsen True lavender; the size of the blossom is almost double that of Margaret Madsen; form is all that can be wished. 9. Mrs. Routzahn Apricot suffused with pink; waved; a very pretty flower. 10. Nubian Chocolate; self wave; better than Othello Spencer. 11. Mrs. Chas. Mander Rich magenta with rather darker wings. Similar 1.





to

Tennant Spencer. 12. Vermilion Brilliant

— — Scarlet

waved. To date this It will doubtless be improved upon sooner or but has some crimson in it.

Scarlet Spencers. rich scarlet,

is

one of the best

later.

The

color

is

Special 75c Spencer Collection 9 Pkgs.

America — Crimson

scarlet,

striped with white.

The

brightest

variety.

Hawlmark Pink — This,











HELEN LEWIS

my

the finest of the Spencer Captain of the Blues Bluish purple with distinct margins of lilac. Dainty Largest white Spencer, edged with clear rose pink. Dobbie’s Cream Grand color. The 'best cream Spencer. Fiery Cross An entirely new shade of Turkey or military red. Mrs. Cuthbertson The best pink and white bi-color. Nubian Chocolate self. Long stems; borne in fours. Royal Purple The best purple. Color royal purple; deepens and improves as the flower ages.





in

opinion,

is

1866— HOUSE OF GURNEY,

YANKTON,

61

26. Suttcr^s Queen Primrose edged and margined, with buff and The standard is wavy and the full expanded wings fairly large and somewhat wavy. The newly opened wings are small and spherical, a very rose.

Per pkt., 12c; ez. y 25c 13. King Edward Spencer crimson, waved flowers are la

distinctive

;

feature

of

the

variety.

Pkt., 12c; oz., 30c.

It is a vigorous of fine Spencer form. grower and a good variety for exhibition

for garden.

D.— 1925



50c Spencer Collection 6 Pkts.

and

S.



Mrs. Houtzahn Apricot sufwaved a very pretty

14.

fused with pink

;

;

flower.

Juanita

15.



Standard mauve,

wings lavender, both striped on white. Medium size, hooded form. Is better understood as Countess of Radnor, striped white.

IS.

Queen Victoria Spencer



Primrose, flushed rose, waved, flushed rose in the primrose bud stage.



17. White Spencer The best cer white. Flowers very large and nificent waved form.

Tennant Spencer—Rosy

18. ple,

self

color;

pur-

shows the tendency

towards Magenta.

30c Spencer Collection 3 Pkts. Pkts., 12c; oi., 25c IS.^Asta Ohn Pinkish lavender, the wings showing a little more clear lavender than the standard, good size and best Spencer form.



20.



King Martoel Giant, chocolate This, we think, is one of the and best maroon Spencers. Martha Washington White

maroon. largest

21.



Similar to edged and flushed rose. Marchioness of Tweeddale, Eric HarHas much more color than vey, etc. Dainty Spencer or Elsie Herbert.

Other Varieties Spencer



Florence Morse Spencer Beautiful light pink, deepening towards 22. edges; very large open wavy form of the Countess Spencer type; long-stemmed. Pkt., 12c. 23. George Herbert Bright rosy carmine of largest size and best Spencer form. Pkt., 12c. Loyalty Violet flake, waved. Hester Spencer, very similar. Pkt., 12c. 24.





Early-Flowering Sweet Peas ...

— Spencer Type

rather a new type of Sweet Peas, early blooming and more satisfactory most cases than the older, later-blooming varieties. These Sweet Peas are used exclusively by florists for forcing purposes, and are equally as good for planting in the open, flowers coming nearly thirty days ahead of the stand-

This

is

ard varieties.



Early Heatherbell Large flowers in fours on stout stems; Spencer Pkt., 25 seeds,

form; rich mauve. 15c.



A rich, deep, sunRicher than the Aus-

Early Liberty proof crimson.

tralian varieties. Pkt., 15 seeds, 25c.

Blue Bird —Large Lilac

MRS. ROUTZAHN

Flowers, borne in threes and fours on long stems.

15 seeds, 25c. Early Morning Star— A beautiful deep orange scarlet or flame color in stand25 seeds, 15c. ard w ith rich orange pink wings. One of the most popular shades. Early Snowflake A magnificent Early White Spencer of superb form and Flowers borne in threes and fours on long stems. The best Early quality. White. 25 seeds, 20c. Early Spring Maid A beautiful cream pink variety. Very strong grower. Flowers large and vines very floriferous. Similar in coloring to late flowering Mrs. Hugh Dickson. 30 seeds, 15c. Hawlmark Lavender There is nothing quite so pure in lavenders as this splendid novelty. The color is difficult to describe accurately, as it is more pure in tone than what may be called the French gray-lavenders, being more a skygray. It is, however, a true, clear light lavender. The flowers are of the largest size; easily the best of its class. Pkt. (30 seeds), 25c; y2 oz., $1.80; oz., $3.50. r





_



Meadow Lark —Deep

rich cream.

Pkt., 25c.

Mixed Spencers For those who want to receive larger quantities of sweet peas for the money, say that our trial ground mixture of Spencer’s gives the desired results, as they run in practically every color and shade. This is an excellent mixture, much lb. better than usually offered in mixed sweet peas. Pkg., 10c; oz., 15c; 50c; y2 lb., $1.00; 1 lb., $1.90. will

HAWLMARK

%

18 66—

62

HOUSE OF GURNEY, YANKYON,

S.

D.

— 1925

ZINNIAS— GIANT DAHLIA-FLOWERING AND OTHER TYPES Zinnia, the old-fashioned kind, is remembered and admired by everyoneof you have had the pleasure of growing the new giant and Dahlia-flowering types of the Bodger strain. The little old flowers that could be planted most anywhere and produce in abundance were worth while, but when John Bodger, Sr., the big flower seed grower on the West Coast, found that he could double and treble their size and did so, and then replaced the dull with blight colors such as we saw in his hundreds of acres today, colors that dazzle the eye and as varied as those of the rainbow, we can appreciate the work of this man who loves flowers. And the Zinnia-loving public must take off their hats to and thank John Bodger, Sr., for the improvement in' the Zinnia. I spent the entire day in his Zinnia fields, going from one variety to another, picking flowers here and there, each one more beautiful than the last and some of them measuring fully seven inches across, as perfect as the decorative dahlia and I asked Mr. Bodger to allow us to use his picture in our as beautifully colored. 1924 catalog, so that our immense number of customers and friends could see and honor the man who put the big “Z” in Zinnia. I want to say to everyone of you that your flowr er garden will not be complete without some of these wonderful flowers. He has added beauty to the small bedding type, eliminating the dull colors and making them all desirable, from the seven-inch giant down to the little fellow one-half to three-fourths of an inch across. In going through Mr. Bodger’s Zi nni as, I could not help pitying the individual who, of necessity or choice, is engaged in some business or located where he could not assist in some way in producing fruits or flowers, or where he might lack the time to make a fruit or flower just a little better than it had been before. Since writing the above, John Bodger has passed to the great beyond, but has left a wonderful heritage in these beautiful flowers.

Few

Zinnia Few

We

recommend them for groups, beds, borders and summer hedges. to 2 feet. seed in the open ground early in spring. Height, 1 Picotee This novelty is the most attractive thing in all the race of Zinnias. The flowers are of the Giant type, each petal distinctly tipped with a darker shade as in Picotee Carnations. They come in a variety of colors: Orange, Flesh, Lemon, Pink and Cerise, each with the peculiar marking. This is an odd yet wonderfully beautiful Zinnia. We offer in mixture only. Picotee Mixed Pkt., 15c. bright.

Sow

JOHN BODGER, THE REAL FATHER OF THE ZINNIAS Golden Pheasant Zinnia

grown or bloom so abundantly and continuously as Marvelous improvements have been wrought in the newer months of August and September Zinnias are incomparably

flowers are so easily

this hardy annual. strains. During the



New Giant Zinnia



—Picotee

type. Flowers not quite as Giant, but very beautiful in appearance, as the edges of

large as Double the petals are all

marked with a distinct color. Golden Pheasant, has a gold background tipped with maroon. Flowers about three inches Pkt., 20c.

—Flowers small and of good shape; double and of Fine mixed Pkt., 10c. Curled and Crested — Flowers this Zinnias are Double Pompon

beautiful form; fine for bouquets.

colors.

of

fine class of

and double, petals being twisted, rendering them free from Splendid colors. Pkt., 10c.

full

large,

stiffness.



Zebra Flowers of all colors, many of which are striped and spotted with different shades, hardly any two alike. Mixed colors. Pkt., 10c. Dahlia Flowered Zinnia This is a new type of Zinnia, was introduced in 1919 and is a most wonderful Zinnia, coming in practically all colors and measuring as much as nine inches across. All colors mixed. Pkg., 15c.





Golden Yellow Double Giant I saw a field of this variety of nearly ten acres, every plant producing a large number of brightest golden yellow flowers you can imagine, immense in size, and truly a wonderful Most excellent for cut flowers. Pkg., 15c. sight.

Giant Flowered Double Zinnias Giant Giant Giant Giant Giant Giant

—A rich shade. Pkt., 10c. — — — Scarlet—A flaming Pkt., 10c. White—Pure snow white. Pkt., 10c. Flowered Mixed —A splendid mixture

Flowered Flowered Flowered Flowered Flowered Flowered

Giant the above and

Crimson

Orange Pure orange. Pkt., 10c. Pink Clear light pink. Pkt., 10c. Purple Clear deep purple. Pkt., 10c.

GOLDEN YELLOW

red.

two and one-half inches, height

others.

Pkt., 10c;

% oz.,

25c.



Pumiia Type Dwarf Double This is the best of all the bedding purposes. All of the dull colors of the old Zinnias have been bred out of this and the mixture will show an extra good quantity of bright colors. Size of flower about

vZinnias for

of plant

about 12 to 14 inches.

Pkg., 15c.



of all of

free

Gracillima (Red Riding Hood) A beautiful fiery red, blooming Zinnia. Pkg., 15c. Dwarf Mixed Double Dahlia-like flowers, best colors.



Pkt., 5c.

Double double

Liiliput

pompon

—Compact,

bearing small, Pkt., 10c.

perfectly

flowers, bright colors.

Tritoma Red-hot Poker, Flame Flower, or Torch Lily Hybrida The introduction of new, continuous flowering Tritomas has given them a prominent place among hardy bedding plants. It is not generally known that they are readily grown from seed, many flowering the first year if sown early. The seed we offer has been



own collection, which is undoubtedly the Of course, for immediate results finest in this country.

saved from our

be better to get plants, but raising them from seed highly interesting. Pkt., 15c; 2 pkts., 25c.

it will

is

Thunbergia (Black-eyed Susan)

BILLY, SON OF H. J. GURNEY. IN 40 ACRES OF BODGER ZINNIAS

Beautiful, rapid growing annual climbers, preferring a warm, sunny situation; used extensively in hanging baskets, vases, low fences, etc., very pretty flowers- in buff, white, orange, etc., with dark eyes; mixed colors; 4 feet. Vi oz. f 40c; pkt., 10c.

1866

The

— HOUSE

little girl in

OF GURNEY, YANKTON,

S.

D.

— 1925

the picture is now past 20 years, the mother a grandmother. has appeared in last seventeen catalogs.

63

This picture

Mixed Wild and Tame Flower Garden This

V combination

We

of all the very best annuals. recommend this for sowing in beds where you want a quick showing of bright colors that will last until frost comes. Also recommend it highly for mixture with Lawn Grass where making a new lawn. not sow in pod, as it -will not be satisis

Do

factory to you. Sowed on new lawns, it gives a fine showing of all the best annuals mixed with green grass, where it pleases the eye and the little ones to see fine bright flowers. Pkt., 5c; oz., 20c; Vi lb., 60c.

Japanese Flower Garden For several years we have been trying to secure from Japan a satisfactory collection of their wonderful flower seeds for planting in lawns and borders. We have secured it this year and believe that everyone ordering flower seed should include

at least a package of this. It can be' planted with lawn grass or in beds by itself, and will prove one of the most satisfactory flower seed investments of the season. Pkt., 10c; oz., 25c; Vi 28s., 70c.

Sweet, Pot and Medicinal Herbs No

complete without a few herbs for culinary or medicinal purposes. Harvest them carefully on a dry day, before they come into full bloom. Anise Cultivated principally for garnishing. Pkt., 5c;

garden

is



oz., 25c.



Balm Principally used for making Balm Tea or Balm Wine. Pkt., 10c; oz., 25c. Basil Sweet The leaves and tops of the shoots are used for soups. Pkt., 5c; oz., 20c. Borage—Excellent for bees. Pkt., 5c; oz., 20c; Vi lb., 60c. Caraway Cultivated for the seed which is used in Pkt., 5c; oz., 15c. confectionery and medicine. Catnip— Pkt., 15c; oz., 45c; Ifo., $1.00; lb., $3.50. Coriander (Coriandrum sativum) Seeds are used by confectioners. Pkt., 5c; oz., 15c.





%



Chives (Schnittlauch) Every vegetable grower should become acquainted with this plant. It is extremely hardy, being a perennial; will grow for years, for this reason it is exceptionally useful as a border or hedge plant. Has a clover shaped violet colored blossom that is very attractive. The green loaves are highly prized for seasoning soups, salads and stews. The provident housewife always has a few clumps in the garden. The flavor resembles very much that of an onion. We recommend the setting out of clumps, rather than the planting of seed. Pkt., 10c; oz., 30c; clumps, 20c each.

—The leaves are used in soups, and put along with

Bill pickles.

Pkt., 5c; oz., 15c; Vi lb., 35c. leaves boiled, used in many fish sauces. Pkt., Sc; oz., 15c. Hyssop The leafy tops and flowers dried for making Hyssop Tea. Pkt., 15c; oz., 35c. Horehound Principally used for medicinal purposes. Pkt., 15c; oz., 35c. Lavender A popular aromatic herb. Pkt., 15c; oz., 35c. iVSarjoram, Sweet For seasoning. Pkt., 5c; oz., 2oc. Pennyroyal A well-known aromatic herb, also useful Pkt., 15c. as a foliag^ plant. Rosemary An aromatic herb. Pkt., 15c; oz., 35c. Rue Used for medicinal purposes, also given to fowls Pkt., 10c; oz., 25c. for theToup. Saffron (Carthamus tinctorius) Pkt., 15c; oz., 30c; Vi lb., 60c. Sage The leaves and tender tops are used in stuffing and sauces. Pkt., 10c; oz., 45c.

Fennel—The









*

SUMMER SAVORY — SAGE— DILL — SWEET MARJORAM Savory,

Summer— Used for seasoning.

Tansy (Tanacetum

vulgare)

Thyme, Broad-Leaved-— For

oz., 35c.

Pkt., 5c; oz., 15c. Pkt., 15c; oz., 45c. Pkt., 10c; .seasoning, etc.

Wormwood

It

is

.

poultry and should be Pkt., 15c; oz., 40c.

beneficial to

planted in poultry grounds.

^

1866— HOUSE OF GURNEY,

64

Modern Methods

The motor to start an electric motor. which we will start first is the one operating one of the No. 290 Clipper Cleaners. The hourly capacity of this Mill is from 65 to 100 bushels alfalfa seed per hour. The seed passes over four different screens, and the air blast, and is divided into five different grades. The Clipper machines are located in the basement of our cleaning houses. All of these different grades of seed are elevated to various floors in the warehouse, weighed carefully and sampled. This first operation over, the Clipper Mill has disposed of all the dust and the dirt, the straw and chaff, all small and light weed and broken alfalfa seed, and the five divisions that we have made are now’ taken to various machines, determined by the expert w-ho is operating them, and cleaned again. will suppose that one of these divisions contained quite a large quantity of Russian thistle. It would then be taken to what w-e call the Rice Machine. The purpose of the machine was to take buckhorn out of clover seed. call it a fanning mill without fans, wind or screens. It is first

operation

is

We

We

nothing more nor less than twenty combined machines, all operating on endless canvas around metal rollers. The method of separation is for the thistle seed to stick to the canvas and be carried over and brushed off. The good alfalfa seed is smooth, shiny and works its way down beside the roller until it discharges at the low-er end, generally perfectly cleaned, absolutely free from any weed seed wdth a rough surface. ,

This machine wdll take out of any smooth surfaced seed all rough surfaced seed. It wdll separate only a very few bags per hour. After this separation is made samples are again taken and examined and if found to be perfectly free from weed or injurious seed of any kind, trash or otherwise, it is then run

D.— 1925

over the Specific Gravity or human machine. The foreman of this department says it wdll hand pick and sort by color, work if improperly fed, refuses to do a bad j ob under any consideration, wdll work for man or boy and works overtime wdthout a kick; in fact, it is a model hired man. It works on all kinds of seeds, will clean Bromus or Parsnip, the lightest seed, and handles Beans, Peas and Corn equally as well. Is it not better to plant seeds of quality? Seed propefly graded by size, weight and shape. The growffh is more even, produce better yields and this means more dollars per acre to you, and dollars per acre are the goal for which we are'

.

refuses to

r

The

S.

of Seed Cleaning

An

up-to-the-minute modern seedsman takes more pride in turning out to his customers seeds that are absolutely best than any other person in any other business. You see, there is so much depending on good seed, free from weeds, and the seedsman sees so many seeds sold to people, generally coming direct from the thresher full of foul seed, dirt, etc., for which the people are paying good money and getting very little of anything but grief in return. He gets to be such a crank on the subject that when a man comes along with a model of some other machine that might be better than anything he has now’, or will do some w ork that some of the machines will not do, it is a very easy matter to secure an order at a price that would make the price of a Ford car look like Fourth of July or Christmas spending money. I suppose nearly every reader of Ninetythis catalog has bought some seed of their neighbors. nine times out of a hundred he did not even have an oldfashioned fanning mill wdth which to clean it, but sold it to you at practically the same price that you could secure strictly If your seed had been first-class seed from the seedsman. recleaned, you have found the price at least 50 per cent higher' or that you were buying 50 per cent poor seed, weeds, dirt, etc. I am just going to take you through a modern seed We are going to let you house, our own, in this little talk. come up on our own track in, we will say, a carload of western South Dakota grown alfalfa seed. It is “spotted” at one of the unloading doors and cleaning commences.

YANKTON,

.

striving

when

w-e

sow and

a wide range of opinion as to the best varieties of alfalfa for various sections of the United States. We have given considerable time and spent considerable money in investigation, and we find the South Dakota No. 12, the Grimm’s and the Cossack absolutely the three best varieties, taking the place, much to the advantage of the grower, of all others. is

>

South Dakota No. 12 or Standard alfalfa, is in greater demand in pounds of seed than either of the other varieties. This we believe is on account of the low’er price. The price of ,

seed should not be taken into consideration, however, except as

Grimm’s Grimm’s alfalfa has received more free advertising from the Department of Agriculture, state colleges, etc., than any other variety, and the people have responded to the advertising by purchasing large quantities of Grimm’s, and it has done remarkably well especially in the eastern states and the extreme northern part of the United States. It is undoubtedly a hardier strain of alfalfa than the South Dakota No. 12, and where South Dakota No. 12 fails to produce paying crops, we would

1

I

Specific Gravity machine. This is rather a complicated fellow— lots of spouts, each one of them turning out a different grade, of seed, and it is more than human in the separation of the different grades and seeds. After the seed has passed over this machine samples are taken and tested for both purity and germination, and an additional sample is taken at this time to be planted in the trial grounds at the next planting time to determine whether or not this seed w as true to type. This last applies more to garden than to grass or alfalfa seeds. We have in our trial grounds each season more than four thousand twelve-foot rows, each row- representing a lot of seed that has gone through our warehouse. Some seed may come into the warehouse with a greater amount of moisture than it should

I

I

r

have and

this is

i

J

determined by a

Hess Moisture Tester.

This machine will show in just a few minutes the exact percentage of moisture contained in any seed or grain. If it shows a larger percentage of moisture than is desirable it is then run over the big

j

Hess Dryer. This machine has a capacity of a good many hundred bushels every ten hours. Operates a three-foot fan six hundred and fifty revolutions per minute. This fan draw’s the air over a steam coil, temperature one hundred and ten to one hundred tw’enty degrees. This forces this warm air through the grain or seed at a violent speed, driving the moisture from the grain quite rapidly. After passing over the dryer the samples are then taken and tested in the

Sho-Gro

seed tester, where 'the exact germination is made If the seed placed in the Sho-Gro germinator alfalfa, clover, sw’eet clover, or any of the hardshelled seeds, failed to germinate up to standard, that lot of seed is then taken and put over the

,

and recorded.

should be of

Scarifying Machine. Its purpose is to scratch or scarify the outside hard hull or the waterproof hull so that the moisture can get into the meat of the seed and cause germination. You understand that sw’eet clover especially requires this scarifying if you w ant it to germinate the same year you plant it. Sweet Clover seed of the very best grade will often germinate as low as fifteen or twenty per cent if taken right from the thresher and planted. By running it over the scarifier this same seed will often germinate 95 to 98 per cent on three days’ test, after the scarifying. Do you wonder then w’hen you receive seed from a strictly up-to-date house like ours that it is as near perfect as man and machine can make it? r

has its bearing on future hay crops, because a difference of say $1.00 or $1.50 per acre in first seed cost can easily be overcome in the first hay crop, and many times overcome if there is a difference of even one or two years in the life of the field planted. South Dakota No. 12 is best over the largest area of any alfalfa selling at a medium price. It is extremely hardy and has given a good account of itself, especially over the western half of the United States. This should be planted at the rate of ten to fifteen pounds of seed per acre, depending on locality, howplanted, and the condition of the seed bed. it

Alfalfa earnestly recommend a good liberal trial of Grimm’s alfalfa. It often succeeds where some other varieties fail. It produces approximately the same quantity of hay per acre under the same conditions as South Dakota No. 12, apparently has a more spreading surface root system, as well as roots penetrating deep into the soil- This is an advantage, taking care of both dry and wet seasons. Sow- the same quantity per acre as of

Dakota No.

12.

Cossack Alfalfa This new variety introduced by Professor Hansen from Siberia has demonstrated its fitness for a greater area of country than any other variety. First, it requires less seed per acre than others, caused by the fact that it stools heavily, often throwing up as many as three to five hundred shoots from a single crown, producing finer and consequently better hay. Second, severe freezes do not injure the plant when it first appears above the ground from seed. Neither does freezing

j

|

reap.

Alfalfa Varieties There

j

affect it w’hile growing, but, unlike all other alfalfas, it will continue to produce its regular crop though frozen solid even at twelve inches high. Third, in nearly all sections of the United States, it outyinlds other varieties from ten to twenty-five per cent in hay tonnage per acre. Fourth, on account of its extreme

hardiness and its perfect root system, it stands severe pasturing by hogs or stock of other kinds and gives you a permanent field for many years. Sow from eight to twelve pounds per acre.

,

1866— HOUSE OF GURNEY,

YANKTON,

S.

D.

— 1925

Professor N. E. Hansen’c Cossack Alfalfa

We are showing photographs of a forty-acre field of Cossack Alfalfa in Lyman County, South Dakota. This you can see is planted light over the tops of the high hills of that section of the country. This forty-acre field is planted in rows three feet apart, and is cultivated after each cutting. The picture, showing the automobile on top of the high hill, is taken when the field is in full bloom, and shows the field ready to be saved for the seed crop.

This alfalfa, after another year’s growth, has proven to be absolutely the best alfalfa from the Gulf of Mexico into Canada, producing plants in the Canadian country seven feet highland producing from that point south clear to the Gulf- of Mexico more hay per acre than any other alfalfa. On account of the spreading crowns which often throw out five hundred stems, and these with many lateral branches, you can save at least one-third in quantity of seed planted per acre over any other variety, which makes it even with the higher price nearly as cheap as the South Dakota 12 and as low as the Liscomb or Grimm’s. D. B. Gurney says: To sum up the whole matter of the Siberian Alfalfa: The United States invested a few thousand dollars in the several exploring trips of Professor HanSenin search of these alfalfas. The State of South Dakota invested about ten thousand dollars for the same purpose, and the people of the United States are millions of dollars better off today than they were before this expenditure of a few thousand dollars, for the reason that Professor Hansen has discovered and brought over an alfalfa that will grow on the millions of acres that w ould not produce alfalfa previously, and the seed will be distributed just as rapidly as possible. Every farmer owning land that would not produce the common alfalfa profitably and successfully is now assured of a hardy alfalfa that will produce paying crops on that ground. Consequently his land is equally as valuable as the more fortunate neighbor owning the low or bottom land. This Cossack Alfalfa has extended the alfalfa growing territory hundreds of miles north and over an area of millions, of acres of the higher and dryer parts of the United States from the Gulf of Mexico to northern Canada. These trips to Siberia and Asiatic Russia made by Professor Hansen were trips that required lots of endurance, many dangers, and all of the inconvenience that one could possioiy suffer, traveling as he did thousands of miles into the interior among T

.

the half-civilized tribes in that country. We have prepared a little nistory book of Professor Hansen which we are publishing. Will tell of his three separate trips to Russia and Siberia as an American Agricultural Explorer. It will tell of his trips into the Province of Semipalatinsk and from there into the land of the Don-Cossack, of his failure to secure any quantity of seed in his first and second Tells of the land where they milk five different trips, and the success in his third trip. animals, of the land of the big, fat rumped sheep, sheep that weiglr twice that of the American kind and store up in the summer forty to fifty pounds of pure mutton tallow on their rump. This is their winter food. It will tell of how he has in the Brookings College^ produced the new small fruits, raspberries, etc., the wonderful Hansen Plums that.ha.ve made It .tells it possible for you to have all of the plums you want for yourself and the market. of the things that Professor Hansen will do in the future. We find the Cossack Alfalfa is very frost resistant; in fact, almost frost-proof, as heavy freezes in the middle of May killed back and destroyed the first cutting of the common We find alfalfa, while the Cossack continued to grow and produce its regular crop of hay, in the fall it will be green and suitable for pasture long after all other varieties are spoiled for that purpose by the freezing..

Price of Cossack seed in sealed bags, 1 lb., 85c; 3 lbs., $2.10; 5 lbs., $3.25; 10 lbs.,; $6.25, postpaid; S3 lbs., $27.00; 100 lbs., $50.00.

Mitragin for inoculating alfalfa, 14 bu. size, 35c; V2 bu. size, 50c; 1 bu. size, 90c; 5 bu. size, $4.00.

From

A. C. Widger,

State Barak of OePere, DePere, Wis., Jan. 22; 1924.

Was

interested in receiving

yqjjr letter

as

on Cossack

we placed

alfalfa this seed in this

about seven years ago. A number of years ago we secured 25 pounds from a secti on

bank in the northern part of and gave it out to a number of farmers in three and four pounds apiece. the state

Never pushed the matter very much, but there is some grown here now, and I might give you results of one of the sample plots that was put in. One of our customers put in acre and from this % acre 100 lbs. was threshed in 1921. Partly planted seven acres with the 100 lbs. in 1922

and in fall of 1923 threshed 25 bushels from this seven acre tract. Had fourteen loads of hay on first crop or about 18 tons of hay and 8 loads from We have the second crop. figured the crop out something like this: 25 bu. 1500 lbs. at 45c $675.00 18 tons hay, $25.00 450.00 per ton 8 loads from 2nd crop, 80.00 $10 per load _

$1205.00

These may not be exact figures, but demonstrate the value of the crop.

Carl G. Scott, Cashier.

The

First State Plummer, Minn.

Bank,

Jan. 23, 1924. notice on the back of your letter our friend Mr. A. C. Widger, 2 miles east of our town, who got started in the growing of alfalfa at our suggestion. He sure is a booster for Cossack and am pleased to note that you have made use

We

of his picture.

Henry

J.

Enderle, Cashier.

Plummer, Mi ran.

Enclosed' a pieture of myself and one Cossack alfalfa plant. I raised from seed purchased of you three years ago. I am standing on the edge of the Cossack field and the picture was taken just 28 days after the first crop was cut. I am six -feet two inches tall, so you can see from this that it is some plant and also a remarkable crop of hay to grow in 28 days. I have never lost a plant by winter-killing. Cossack alfalfa is surely going to put Northwest Minnesota on the alfalfa map. The plant was dug on the 23rd day of July, took first prize overall kinds at Red Lake County Fair, also first at Thief River Falls, Pennington County, Fair. The best melons for this season, those with which I have had best success are your Golden Champlain muskmelon and winter watermelon. Your northern hardy seeds are the seeds *f or this north country. this

1866

66

— HOUSE

OF GURNEY, YANKTON,

S.

D.— 1925

DUROC HOGS IN COSSACK—BEST PASTURE ALFALFA This picture shows a bunch of our September pigs in the alfalfa field in the latter part of May. I do not know that Durq.cs like alfalfa any better than other pigs, but if others

Nelson Hood Co., Kedfield, Iowa. July 3, 1924. Last season we sowed thirty-five acres of alfalfa from your Company; ten acres of this was Cossack. This ten

They acres sure has the attention of the farmers here. inquire of us for the Cossack seed and we have referred them to you for prices. Please let us know what price you can furnish us with five hundred pounds, for August delivery.

like it as well as the Durocs and thrive as well, the man neglects raising alfalfa for his pigs is missing a bet. 160 head in this 10-acre field and it made a heap of pork.

We

From

w ho had r

Ufticio Tecraico Agrario Poggi, Livorno, Italy.

Returning thanks for the beautiful photographs received. We enclose purchase for 222 pounds of Cossack alfalfa. We are spending much money for the Cossack advertising and hope for the exclusive representation of your house in Italy. Cossack alfalfa has reclaimed much of the fruit land.

Grimm’; Alfalfa This alfalfa was introduced into Minnesota from Germany by a German immigrant named Grimm. The seed was planted on his farm and it is claimed that plants from the original seed are still growing from the original planting. Grimm’s alfalfa over a period of more than fifteen years has been advertised more than any other variety and has received favorable comment from good authorities, and has demonstrated its ability to withstand the severe Winters of By the extreme North better than the common varieties. doing this, it has obtained an enviable reputation for hardiness

in 1857

and

yield. Grimm’s alfalfa usually be distinguished from common alfalfa on account of a slight variegation in color of its blossoms. ou will find in the true fields some flowers yellow, green, blue, brown, etc., instead of all purple, as in the common varieties.

may

Y

You can usually determine it by its branching root system, as a greater number of the plants have this branch root system than the common and it enables the Grimm’s to withstand the hard Winters and helps it to produce a greater crop of hay than the common, as it secures its food from the surface, as well as the depth of the soil.

American Grown This high quality alfalfa seed is the common variety suitable for some localities, used in large quantities in the south.

The

following

is

an extract from the Farmers’ Bulletin

No. 757, entitled Commercial Varieties of Alfalfa: “On account of its superior hardiness, Grimm’s alfalfa is particularly recommended for the northern part of the Great Plains region and all parts of the Northwest. It has, also, proved better able to survive the Winters in the. colder portion of the humid section of the country where winter killing is a serious factor. The supply of seed on the market is still rather limited and commands a high price.”

We

have a reasonable supply of this variety of seed and furnish certificate of genuineness with each shipment.

Grimm’s alfalfa seed prices are where they belong. We quote cei’tified Grimm’s alfalfa at a legitimate price, one that gives us a fair profit on: each transaction. Why pay more? All our Grimm’s is grown in South Dakota, Montana and North Dakota. 1 !b., 65c; 10 lbs., $5.00; 50 ibs., $22.50; 100 lbs., 543.00.

Vz

Nltragin for Inoculating Alfalfa. Vi bushel size, 35c; bushel size, 50c; 1 bushel size, 90c; 5 bushel size, $4.00.

Common

Alfalfa

10 lbs,, $3.00; 50 lbs., $12.50; 100 lbs., $24.00; 500 lbs., $115.00.

Canadian Grown Variegated Alfalfa Not so hardy as Cossack but an extremely hardy,

satisfac-

10 lbs., $4.50; 50

lbs., 520.00;

100

lbs., $38.00.

tory variety generally over the northwest.

Alfalfa with Small Graii: Alfalfa with small grain as a nurse crop is all right if you do not overdo the small grain. advise a nurse crop with alfalfa, but in the right proportions. The grain that does the most good and the least harm is one bushel of Barley to the acre with 12 to 14 pounds bf alfalfa, the reason for barley,

We

it

ripens earlier and does not

make

the dense shade of other

The poor?st nurse crop and the one used most is oats at the rate of a full seeding. If you are bound to sow oats, use not to exceed one bushel per acre, the earliest variety, and cut them at least six inches high when you harvest. You want a good, permanent field of alfalfa. We want you to have it. Let’s wr ork together. grains.

T

Aije.the Corn, the

Ghrn

Golden Gbrn Within whose Golden Heart There is Strength for J ail the Nations the

Canyon afford to raise poor

Corn? Canyouafford to throve

av)ay Money \

in poor

yields

WIMPLE'S :LLOW D£NT

DE WOLF'S (TRA PROLIFIC

NORTH DAKOTA WHITE DENT

MINNESOTA No. 13

Our seed corn

is

of

the highest qual-

Plant early varieties for early feed i

and crowd the growth of the young stock

guaranteed to test to your satisfaction, or it may be returned at our expense ity,

tl it

a

ii

tl

a

E a o b

!i

t I

f i

c

t

i

I

A FIELD OF HULL-LESS OATS 1

i

THE HULL-LESS OAT AS

THRESHED

NORTHERN GROWN EARLY SOY BEANS

'TOLL-LESS OATS Thegreatest agricultural invention of the age, out yields the common oat. No hulls to pay freight on. A most wonderful feed for man and beast. 1

lb.,

35c.; 5

$3.50; 50 lbs.,

lbs.,

lbs.,

$21.00.

$1.20; 10 lbs., $2.00, 25 $5.00; 100 lbs., $8.00;

lbs.,

300

1866— HOUSE OF

GURNEY, YANKTON,

HULL-LESS OATS— OTTAWA over a vast area has demonstrated that this exceptional variety of Hull-less oats has come to stay, and within a very few years a crop of oats with the hulls on will be a curiosity, as you can no longer afford to grow„them compared with the Hull-less. A year ago we sent our representative to Alberta, Canada, to investigate and load the Hull-less oats we had grown for us in that territory. He informed us that our fields produced 2,295 pounds of oat meat per acre and that they were being grown in a small way hundreds of miles north of there profitably. The Hull-less oat threshes out like wheat or rye, the berry as large and plump as the best rye, frpm which you can make oatmeal or crushed oats equal to the best breakfast food. The whole berry cooks quickly and retains its shape like rice. The Hull-less oat is the most valuable feed for the grower of

Another year’s

I

1

I

trial

live stock, especially pigs and calves, as you get entirely away irritating effect of the hull when fed to young stock.

from the

many devices to remove the hull before have either wasted a good part of the grain or the method was too expensive. Many feeders buy the oatmeal direct from the mills, but this has been too expensive. With the introduction of the Ottawa 480 Liberty Hull-less, we have solved the problem, and you may now grow your own breakfast Feeders have used

feeding,

!

food, as well as this valuable grain for your stock.

Liberty Hull-less was originated and introduced by Professor of the Department of Agriculture in Saskatchewan,

Saunders Canada.

480

S.

D.— 1925

69

LIBERTY

Last year I made the statement in the catalog that Liberty Hull-less did not produce as many bushels of hulled oats, as many varieties of oats with the hull on. You must take into consideration, however, that one bushel of Hull-less oats is equal for all purposes to two bushels with the hulls on. I am pleased to give you the yield in pounds per acre, as reported to us by a number of growers. These figures are measured bushels per acre, and as the Hull-less oat tests an average of about fifty pounds per bushel, you will see the actual yield per acre in weight far exceeds the average yield of the common or oat with the hull on.

Yields in Pounds Per Acre William Bohian, Mont 1,650 pounds Arthur Hahrodt, N. D 1,350 pounds Daniel F. Fiersteine, la 1,000 pounds Farrend Lewis, Wis 2,285 pounds L. D. Simmons, la 1,750 pounds Domina Westry, Wis 2,150 pounds Martin Christianson, Ida 1,500 pounds Rhinhard Bubs, S. D 2,000 pounds Alex. Molan, Minn 2,285 pounds James Du Boys, 111 1,970 pounds W. D. Tarroll, Kans 1,845 pounds The above report covers the highest and the lowest yields per acre reported. We have reports averaging between the two high and low figures.

Oatmeal While You Wait With the introduction of the Hull-less oat we have solved the breakfast food problem and you can grind and make your own oatmeal at probably less than one-fourth price paid for it in the store. These oats can be ground in any kind or variety of mill. We have ground them through a food-chopper, cracker mills, the ordinary burrs of a feed mill, over the stone and through the rollers of a flour mill and it has made strictly high grade, in fact better oatmeal than you could purchase from the store.

To demonstrate that this is true we are going to enclose with each 100 lb. lot purchase a package of oatmeal made over an ordinary mill, so that you may determine for yourself just how good this breakfast food is. Remember this package of oatmeal goes only with 100 pounds or larger lots. The reports made by the growlers are unanimous that it does not lodge, that it produces reasonably tall, stout straw that holds it up well, that it does not rust to the extent of serious damage, that it matures immediately after the Kherson Early oat, that it does not shell in the field, that it is as easily threshed as the common oat, all of them reporting that they will abandon all other varieties of oats from this time on, that

W. R. Butler, Pope County, Minn. Sept. 21, 1924. We I am enclosing sample of Liber tv Hull-less Oats. bought one hundred pounds front you last Spring and threshed one hundred and two bushel. Hilmer Hultquist, Redwood County, Minn. Aug.

15, 1924. Early last Spring,

we purchased one hundred pounds of Ottawa 480 Liberty Hull-less Oats. We seeded it on two and had great results. The two acres produced 3,200 pounds. It is very good quality and our neighbors acres

are very interested in

it.

it

should be planted at the rate of

fifty

in order to secure the highest yield.

pounds

The

of seed per acre oat stools well and

produces very large spreading heads with an exceptionally large number of kernels in each head. The oats which we will send you tests 50 pounds or better per measured bushel, Canadian and American grown, a certificate in each package certifying that it is Liberty Hull-less No/480, this being the only desirable variety of Hull-less oats produced. Last year the available supply was approximately 800 bushels and we returned money to our customers for more than three times the number of bushels we were able to supply. Our supply this year is approximately 2,500 bushels and when this

We

is exhausted, money will be refunded. advise early orders than the average order of 1924, because this oat has demonstrated that it is the most valuable farm crop, producing more dollars per acre in grain than any other kind or variety of grain. paid this past season to a number of growers in excess of $100.00 per acre for their crop.

in larger quantities

We

1 5b., 35c; 5 lbs., $1.20; 10 tbs., $2.00; 25 lbs., $3.50; 50 lbs., $5.00; 100 lbs., $8,00; 300 lbs., $21.00.

B, F. Lawyer, Burleigh County, M. D, Aug. 5, 1924. The writer purchased one thousand pounds of Liberty

from your good Company last Spring, which have seeded on twenty acres. I informed you at the time that I would write you from time to time as to the progress they were making and have to advise that they are very fine. They are about ready to cut and I figure they will average about forty bushel to the acre. Hull-less Oats

I

White Hull -less Barley We

are showing on the opposite page a field of the White Hull-less Barley. The White Hull-less has neither beards nor hulls, and for this reason is more desirable than the Blue HullCommon barley, as you know, has less which has the beards. both beards and hulls and is not so desirable in any way as that without beards, or the Hull-less. This barley threshes out just like wheat or rye, or the hull-less oat, and is extremely early, earlier than any other variety of barley, which insures a crop of the earliest feed for the pigs. This you recognize is a great advantage, especially when you have been short in your crop the year previous, or have sold or fed up everything and want to mature a crop at the earliest possible moment to crowd five stock ready for market.

Hull-less Barley yields equal to the common barley, and can be planted from the first of April to the middle of May. This barley is excellent for bread-making and was used extensively during the war for that purpose. Its jdeld is generally much in excess of wheat. Sow one hundred pounds per acre. Price: 15 lbs., 85c; 24 lbs., $1.50; 48 lbs., $2.75; 240 lbs., $11.00; 480 Ibs,, $21.00. Price of Blue Hull-less Barley: This is identical with White Hull-less except that it is blue in color and has beards. 15 ibs., 85c; 24 lbs., $1.50; 43 lbs., $2.50; 240 lbs., $10.00; 480 Ibs., $19.00.

Soy Beans On

the opposite page we are showing just a single leaf and a cluster of the pods of the soy bean. During the war, the Department of Agriculture of the United States made a special campaign to increase the acreage of soy beans all over the territory where they could be grown profitably. The soy bean is one of the richest foods you can produce, especially valuable The plant grows to a for silage purposes and for hog feed. maximum height of about three feet, ordinarily one and onefrom bottom to top with half to two feet, and is literally covered clusters of pods, each one containing from four to five and refer you to page 71 for a eight to ten of the beans. I want to complete description and how to handle these beans. contract growers promany our of This past season of 1924, duced as high as fifty bushels of threshed beans to the acre. ordinary threshing machine, withan with They were threshed out cracking or damaging the beans at all.

flour is coming into more general use each year, and demand will increase as it becomes better known. Varieties showing the greatest yield and adaptability to this section are the Mandarin, Wisconsin Early Black and Ito-San. These are the northern grown, early maturing varieties.

Soy bean

the

Price: Per lb., 30c; 3 Ibs., 65c; 10 Ibs., $1.65; 50 Ibs., $4.00; 100 Ibs., $7.50,

Late or Southern Grown Soy Beans These are grown for us on contract farther south. They are suitable for all points south of Omaha, Nebraska. They grow taller and are excellent for silage purposes in that section. Can be planted with corn and mature at the right time for silage. Price: 1 lb., 20c; 3 Ibs., 50c; 10 lbs., $1,00; 50 Ibs., $3.75;

100 Ibs., $6.50.

YANKTON,

1866— HOUSE OF GURNEY,

70

ALFALFA SEED, DAKOTA

S.

D.— 1925

No. 12

Dakota Grown, 99 Per Cent Pure, Guaranteed For more than forty years the state of South Dakota has been producing crops of alfalfa that are profitable. When I say profitable I mean that when the first acre of alfalfa seed was planted in South Dakota and that seed commenced to grow and they cut the first crop, that acre of alfalfa was producing a profitable crop, more profitable than other crops, no matter what they were, in that neighborhood. When that single acre of alfalfa was increased to hundreds of thousands of acres the state was made richer by millions of dollars, and today South Dakota and the world feel the effect of the single acre of alfalfa planted in South Dakota more than forty years We do not know the source of the seed first planted, ago. but we do know that by process of elimination and the “survival of the fittest” that South Dakota is producing alfalfa seed that in turn produces the hardiest alfalfa plants, and those that will yield greater returns in hay than seed grown in any other part of the world. That is a broad statement, but it has been demonstrated, and today alfalfa seed produced in South Dakota is worth and sells for from two to six cents per pound more than seed produced in other states. The alfalfa seed which we are offering you as Dakota grown is knowm as DAKOTA No. This seed is produced from old fields or from fields whose 12. parentage is the old Dakota fields. Our seed is all from the high and dry section of western South Dakota (where the rainfall is much less than in Minnesota, the home of the much advertised high priced Grimms Alfalfa), where the snow covering is very light or none at all, where the temperature drops from five to fifteen degrees lower than any other point in the These strenuous conditions have eliminated any plant state. that may have been tender, leaving nothing but the hardiest to produce seed, and in each successive generation any plant showdng any inherent weakness has been destroyed by these Alfalfa growing in conditions and the fittest has survived. the United States is no longer an experiment. There is not one state in the Union but can produce alfalfa on most of its land profitably, and with the advent of DAKOTA ON VIRGIN SOIL, FREE FROM FOUL SEED,

SEED,

GROWN GROWN IT MAKES THE PROFITS LARGER AND THE

TASK OF SECURING A PERFECT STAND VERY SIMPLE.

in the heavy alfalfa (from Dakota grown seed), and “taxied off” in the short grass (from southern grown seed).

All alfalfa seed offered by us is recleaned and first class in every respect. Any acre of land, no matter where located, will produce a crop of alfalfa seed or hay, is worth $200.00 per acre or more and will pay a good income on that amount. It will produce more forage, either green or dry, than any It successfully resists the other known clover or grass. fiercest drought; in the driest weather, when every blade of grass withers for want of moisture alfalfa stands up bright and green as in the spring. South Dakota No. 12 is proof against our severest winters. It is adapted to dry aqd sandy soil where other plants fail to grow, as well as those that are deep and rich. Its roots, often measuring thirty feet in length, force their w ay down deep into the subsoil in search of moisture and plant foods that cannot be reached by other plants. It draws nitrogen from the air and stores it in the soil more than 100 per cent faster than any other clover excepting sweet clover. Alfalfa is better than a bank account, for it never fails or goes into the hands of a receiver. It is weather proof, for cold does not injure and heat makes it grow all the better. The rust does not affect it. A severe hail storm might beat it into the ground, but in six weeks you could cut a crop of from one to two tons of hay per acre. Fire will not kill it; fields can be burned over safely early in the spring. When growing there is no stopping it. Begin cutting a 40-acre field, and when your last load is handled at one end of the field it is ready to cut again at the other. For fattening your cattle and hogs it will save one-half of the grain. This has been absolutely demonstrated by the best feeders. If your ground will grow alfalfa, you have “the world by the tail with a down if it

T

hill

pull.”

WORD

WARNING —

OF We wish to impress on our readers that nearly all of the alfalfa offered under various names and at high prices is western South Dakota grown alfalfa seed, and this seed you could not make any better than

A

no matter what price you pay for it. Consequently you had better purchase it under its correct name and at a reasonable price, rather than at a high price, and secure the same In some cases this is the fault of the growers, w ho find seed. that by changing the name they can secure a higher price for their seed, and judging from reports from our purchasing agents they have caught a crop of suckers. It is absolutely impossible for you to get better alfalfa seed, in commercial quantities, than Gurney’s South Dakota No. 12 Alfalfa. We guarantee it to be 99 per cent pure. Sold for just what it is and at a price that brings it within the reach of all. Lb.,

it is

T

DAKOTA

No. 12

ALFALFA AND AEROPLANES TENNESSEE

IN

Our Mr. Seeley takes a trip to Tennessee at least once each year to get lined up on the alfalfa seed business. We sell carloads in the South each year, and a picture was taken of Mr. Seeley and one of our customers in an alfalfa field grown from Gurney seed. This field was rented by the government as a landing field during the war, and Mr. Seeley met many of the aviators. One-half of the field was planted to southern grown seed, the other half to Dakota No. 12. The aviators remarked to Mr. Seeley that they always “cushioned” down .

Soja Beans (or Soy Beans) (See Colored Plate,

Page 68)

During the period of the World’s War the Department of Agriculture spent considerable time and energy in educating the growers to a greater diversity in farming. They were ably seconded by the various State Agricultural Colleges and on account of the propaganda there was a very heavy demand The demand for some of the items, especially the Soja Beans. for the early variety suitable for Northwest planting was so great that seed enough had never been produced to supply the intended planter. This year we will, I think, be able to fill orders in

full.

The Early Maturing Soy Beans listed by us are all absoNorthern grown and of the earliest varieties suitable for planting in this and sections farther north. On account of the lesser acreage grown for seed purposes, these are higher priced than the southern beans, but only about one-half the price of one year ago. These beans yield enormously. Price: Northern Grown Early Varieties, 1 lb., 30c; 3 lbs., 65c; 10 lbs., $1.65; 50 lbs., $4.00; 100 lbs., $7.50. lutely



Late or Southern Grown Soy Beans These are suitable for all points south of Omaha, Nebraska, when planted with corn for silage purposes, as they wall mature properly with the corn and add considerable value to your corn silage. Price: Late Southern Grown, 1 lb., 20c; 3 lbs., 50c; 10 lbs., $1.00; 50 lbs., $3.75; 100 lbs., $6.50.

Black, Ito San and Mandarin were the best two varieties out of more than twenty in our trial grounds in 1922. We have both in Northern Grown. Q. Can soy beans be planted with corn? A. Yes: either for hogging or sheeping down or silage purposes. It requires from three to five pounds of seed per acre when planted with corn.

Wisconsin

Early

50c; 10 lbs., $4.00; 50 lbs., $16.00; lbs., $145.00; 1,000 lbs., $280.30.

100

lbs.,

$30.00; 500

Nitragin for inoculating alfalfa. V\ bu. size, 35c; bu. size, 90c; 5 bu. size, $4.00.

%

bu

*

size, 50c;

How many pounds of soy beans to the acre if drilled rows wide enough for cultivation? Forty to sixty pounds, depending upon the width between and rate of planting in the rows. Q. Is this a good w ay of handling soy beans? It is one of the best. A. They can be drilled with an ordinary corn planter or with a wheat drill by stopping up a number of the holes so the rows will be from 32 to 36 inches apart. The beans should not be more than two inches apart in the row in Iowa; perhaps a little farther apart where the Q.

in

A.

7

rainfall is less. If planted broadcast, how many pounds per acre? Q. A. Sixty to ninety pounds. Q. At what stage of maturity should the soy beans go into the silo? A. About half ripe. That is, in the dough stage and the leaves just starting to dry. A later and larger bean can be used for silage pm-poses than for hogging down or seeding purposes. Q. Would you advise inoculation of soy beans? A. Yes. The beans may do very well without, but they will not improve the land unless inoculated. At what stage of maturity should soy beans be cut Q.

for

hay?

A. When the pods are well filled and when the first leaves begin to turn brown. Q. What is the feeding value of the hay, especially for dairy cattle? It contains practically the same amount of protein as A. alfalfa, but is not quite as palatable. For sheep it will take the place of alfalfa hay, pound for pound. Q. Will soy beans and corn silage increase the milk flow: over corn silage alone? I do not know of any exact experimental data on this A. particular point. A number of practical dairymen in this believe that it will. state

1866

— HOUSE

OF GURNEY, YANKTON,

S.

SWEET CLOVER,

— 1925

D.

71

The White Blossom Kind

A great many years ago a Nebraska farmer called at our office and wanted to purchase one bushel of the white flowered Sweet Clover seed. We were both pained and surprised to think any man wished to plant the so-called weed. We told him so in a few harsh words and refused to sell it to him. He tffid us if we did not get it for him ne would buy it himself and plant it anyway. We finally consented to get it and told him we would watch results. This was planted opposite lankton on the Missouri Bottoms, and produced an immense quantity of bee feed, for the purpose for which this man purchased it. Alter it had growth one or two years he commenced to take a crop of hay from it and found that it produced more bee feed aQ goo<* crci P of hay that his stock was equally as fond of as alfalfa. Tnif 1 hen we commenced to write about it, and urged its planting almost 7

everywhere. Today there is' as great demand for the white-flowered feweet Clover as for Alfalfa, but the demand cannot be supplied, as the seed is very difficult to save. It will outyield Alfalfa as far as seed production is concerned, but the seed drops so easily that no one has been able to discover a method of harvesting that wall save more than 10 to 20 per cent of the crop.

Sweet Clover Seed

Scarified

White Blossom Sweet Clover has become such a necessary crop on the larm, and under old conditions there was so much trouble having t

,

satisfactory germination, that we shall scarify all of this sweet clover seed that goes to our customers and we will not charge you one cent more lor this than you would have to pay for that which is not scarified. On numerous tests of sweet clover seed, unscarified, we find the germination from 25 to 50 per cent; on the same seed, scarified, we often have 9o per cent germination in a seven days’ test. also hnd in the unscarified seed that the largest, plumpest, hardest seed, and consequently the best seed are these that did not germinate, but probably stay7 ed in the ground one year before germination. By this scarifying process we scratch the hull of this hard seed, which allows

We

ge^ * n anr^ fastens germination. A e following analyses were made by the Wyoming fetation of Sweet Clover and Alfalfa grown on the „

Experiment

.

experimental farm,

and published in Wyoming Bulletin No. 70, pages 70 and 74. These analyses show Sweet Clover to be richer than Alfalfa in protein (muscle, bone and tissue material), and in pit.lipr py+tqpI. tor fat-forming subeither extract,

SWEET CLOVER ALFALFA

stance.

Cut Oct. 1904

4,

.

10,

Average

1905

of 11

Samples

Water.

Ash

Cut Aug.

6.02

6.88 11.03 1.96 22.27

.

Crude protein Crude fiber

6.57 8.79 1.66

21.77 31.25 18.00 22T9 15.14 42.22 35.67 36.59 e Cornell University, Ithaca, N. Y., that grasses grown with legumes contain more protein and consequently are of more economical value than when grown alone. The following tabic is taken from Cornell Bulletin No. 294: —Kindness International Harvester Co. IYotein per Ton Protein in of Hay (10*% Dry Matter Moisture) Clover Crop: Per Cent Pounds Timothy: grown alone 17. 19 309 The New An mini; White. Sweet Clover This extremely Timothy grown with Clover ’442 24.56 valu&ble.'neyv; annual white blqsspiuvj-weet clover was discovered, Comparative analyses of sweet clover, alfalfa, red. clov.er, by. Prof. Hughes" of the Iowa- Experiment; Station in some" timothy, and cow peasishowed that only the' alfalfa- and- cow biennial, white blossom sweet -clover .plants* from .'Alabama; peas; .excelled sweet clover in percentage of- protein.. Oofiand “a combination of the. names of ':the -Professor a-hd- the sidejed\frbrn'theistandpoint of digestible nutrient,; we findthe state from whiqh it came give it ^the-.ujame’. ‘fttubain .” The^ foilbyqhg'cnmparative values for the different- feeds: p pr annual white '.blossom sweet, clbv.ea' .h^s/beeh. the. most valuable j 0 ,, * ;7Swhet;Clover?hay ’.$ 18.49 : to.'. use in .crop, rotation, -but Hubnm will take, its place just as Alfalfa -hay; .T 20.16 sobh as tlte..seedis-pmdufce(l ih.quantitieBCtpJv/aiTant the proper; Timothy hay low ’.prices. ...It- is, epu&h fn'ievery. way;* to T^e; biennial white 0,80 ... Bed' Glover hay. ... blossom, and ^superior ih the Tact that y,6u rget the~same result im one year or. rather -in- a^out TOO ;days, .that' you get with the ; Cow-pea hray. Shelled corn; ... biennial in two' years. 20.16

Hubam

.

Nitrogen free extract

Wonderful growth of nodules, containing the nitrogen gathering bacteria, on upper portion of sweet clover root. Found growing in the beach sand of Lake Michigan in North Chicago.

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Sweet Clover Price and Sow Per Acre

Hubam The

greatest value of

as a

Hubam

For hav purposes, 15: lbs. v We would: advise that you place your order very early, as there will be an immense demand' for it this season. Per lb*, 35c; 10 lbs., $3.00; 50 lbs., $11.00; 100 lbs., S18.50. Nitragir for inoculating sweet clover, V2 bu. size, 40c; 1 bu. size, 75c.

Bee Feed as

we

see

it, is its

:

,

.

value' as a

.

Profits in

7

Grundy County Dwarf Sweet Clover We offer this special strain. of Dwarf S.weet Clover, originated

Yellow Blossomed Sweet Clover This is preferred by some' to the white blossomed for pasture and inoculation of soils. We have tested it out and found it equal to of better for crop rotation, but does not produce an equal tonnage per. acre with the white. A very valuable clover, however, and will be used in greater quantities each year. Pound, 30c; 10 lbs., $2,50; 50 lbs., $10,50; 100

Grundy -County, Illinois,, wit h a firm belief that it will be-pf considerable value in excess of the -common Sweet- Clover,:as soon as a sufficient acreage is planted to: produce seed to supin

Honey

not unusual in South Dakota for a single stand; of bees to produce as high as one hundred sixty-eight pounds or seven supers of honey. This will retail at least at twenty-five cents per pound or a total of forty-two dollars. per year from a first investment of about $7.00, the price of a stand of bees. If you do not have a few stands, write us and we will give you Grow full instructions for care and a special price on bees. your own Honey, it is pleasant and profitable. Price of Hubam, 1 oz., 15c; 1 lb., 60c; 3 lbs., $1.25; 5 lbs., $2.25; 10 lbs., $4.00; 50 lbs., $18.00; 100 lbs., $34.00. It is

lbs., $15.50.

seed; purposes, -5 Tbs. -

fiigh honey producing plant. fSpw Hubam just as early as you can in. the. spring arid hy June 15th you should have quantities of blossoms, this should continue for close to forty-five days and will produce as much honey per plant "and as high quality as from; any .plant grown.

qijick;;

If for



ply- the- demand.-

f"

-

This strain is earlier, more dwarf and leafy than the common Clover and has several outstanding features: First, the fact is that it is three weeks earlier than the com* mon Sweet Clover. Thus the seed ripens ahead of most seeds

and

of frost.

:

.

Second, it grows to a good height and makes agood hay crop it is. not as tall, woody and hard to handle as he common. Third, it is finer and more leafy- than the common and branches thick about one foot above the ground, making a greater quantity of better quality hay. Fourth, it yields more seed than the common and on account of the finer stalks is more easily sowed. Some of. the farms in Grundy County this past Season, produced as high, as fifteen bushel of this seed per acre. Grundy County Sweet Clover is considered in its home County, more like alfalfa than' Sweet Clover. It grows a good deal like alfalfa, only faster so that it might be called a White Blossomed Alfalfa. 1 lb,, 45s; 10 lbs,, $3=79; 59 lbs=, $18,99; 199 lbs., $35,99,

and

.

'

1866— HOUSE OF GURNEY, YANKTON,

'2

A SOUTH

S.

D.

— 1925

DAKOTA FIELD OF MEDIUM RED CLOVER Medium



Red Our Red Clover Seed is all northern grown. It is first-class in eveiy particular. This seed will be much better for the northern planters and also for those south Our grass and clover seeds are of us than seed grown in Iowa, Kansas and Nebraska. good enough to comply with any state laws. It’s the kind we sell always, not sometimes. Valuable not only as a forage plant, but also for its fertilizing properties on the soil. It has very long and powerful tap roots, and when these roots decay they add largely to that black mass of matter called the soil. As a forage plant it makes an excellent quality Sow about 12 or 15 pounds to the acre. of hay, and can be cut at least twice a year. Weight 60 lbs. per bushel. 1 lb., 50c; 30 lbs., $12.50; 60 lbs., $24.00: ICOJbs., 539.00.

Mammoth Red

Clover

— This

grows much

taller than Red Medium, with larger, It will produce more hay on poor Pound, 50c; 30 lbs., $12.50; bu.)

and large, slightly pointed leaflets. ground than any of the other clovers. (60 lbs. per leafier stalks,

60 lbs., $24.00: 100 lbs., $39.00. Alsike, or Swedish Clover This clover comes from the little province of Alsike, in Sweden. It is one of the hardiest varieties known, being perennial and absolutely refuses It is a great to winter kill; it is alike capable of resisting the extremes of drought or wet. Produces annually a great quantity of herbage of favorite with all who have tried it. excellent quality. Sow in spring or fall about 8 to 10 pounds per acre. Weight, 60 lbs. per bu. Pound, 35c; 30 lbs., $8.00; 60 lbs., $14.20; 100 lbs., $22.00. White Dutch Clover— Excellent pasture Clover, forming with Kentucky Blue Grass Sow 5 or 6 pounds to acre. the finest and most nutritious food for sheep and cows. Pound, 80c; 10 lbs., $7.50; 20 lbs., $14.50. Weijdit, 60 lbs. per bu. Alsike and Timothy In the Northwest there is a great demand for a mixture of This mixture Alsike and Timothy Seed mixed in the right proportion ready for sowing. is especially valuable for low, wet places, for permanent meadow or for pasture, and on account of the very low price at which we offer it you can seed down more ground for the Grass Seed Line. Pound, postpaid, 25c; 50 lbs., $6.50; 100 lbs., $12.00. Nitragin for inoculating clover, bu. size, 35c; Vz bu. size, 50c; 1 bu. size, 90c





ALSIKE CLOVER

%

GURNEY’S HIGH-GRADE SEED CORN FOR SPRING OF 1925 Who Introduced and Originated and Best Varieties of Early Corn? We

are practically the introducers, of most of the early varieties that will absolutely mature within the ninety-day limit in North and South Dakota. For instance, most Minnesota No. 13 offered by other parties can be traced back to do not claim to have the original stock from Gurney’s. originated Minnesota No. 13, as it was originated by the Agricultural College of Minnesota, but we do claim to have had more to do with introducing it to the planter and extending the Corn Belt many hundreds of miles north than others. Our August loth is of our own origination and introduction and is safe to plant anywhere that corn of any variety can be grown. By purchasing the early varieties you can always get in on the old corn market with new corn. The latter part of October or early part of November the price for shelled corn in the terminal market is always high. By planting early varieties and husking your corn early you can get this high price, which is generally 10 to 20 cents better than new corn moves at. claim, and justly, that the early varieties of corn, such as Minnesota No. 13, August 15th and Gurney’s Rainbow Flint have increased the land values of northern South Dakota, Iowa, Minnesota and North Dakota millions of dollars. Previous to the introduction of these varieties it was not considered profitable to grow corn,

We

We

Seed

Com

In the spring of 1922 we shipped over (80,000) eighty thousand bushels of seed corn to Russia. This was composed of various, varieties of early Dents and 5,000 bushels of Gurney’s Rainbow Flint. The field from which the Rainbow was

and land that will not produce soon worn out and of but little belt that vail produce from 40 to season is worth $150 per acre of

corn, but small grain only, is value. Any land in the corn 50 bushels of corn per acre per

any man’s money.

In this section of South Dakota the bulk of our farmers have decided from practical experience that Minnesota 13 will outyield any varieties of Corn that can be planted, and if planted by May 25th they can be assured of an excellent crop of ripe Corn by September 1. This variety is outyi elding by actual weight the late varieties. In the following descriptions we are telling you just what the corn does here with us, and we also tell you the kinds that you should plant if you want ripe corn. For instance, if you live in North Dakota and you want to grow Corn, not fodder, we tell you to plant Gurney’s August 15th, North Western Dent and Gurney’s Rainbow Flint. Now, do not buy Silver Mine to plant there, because if you do you will be disappointed.

In buying seed corn, figure on one bushel for each 6 to 8

you wish to plant. Prices of Seed Corn subject to

acres

change without notice.

to Russia picked was on one of our own farms near Yankton and on a measured 145 acres we husked, weighed in over the "scales 10,138 bushels, one half of which went to Russia.

H. C. Luedfke, Carver County, Minn. Oct. 13, 1924. I bought from you last Spring, Silver King, Rainbow Flint and Minnesota No. 13 seed corn. I received first prize on Rainbow Flint and Minnesota No. 13 at Waconia Fair and received first on the Minnesota No. 13 at Carver County Fair. This com matured fine. -

prize

and sweep-stakes s

~

'

1866— HOUSE OF GURNEY,

YANKTON,

MINNESOTA

S.

D.

— 1925

73

13

THE CORN THAT ADDED MILLIONS OF DOLLARS TO FARM VALUES AND CROWDED THE CORN BELT 300 MILES FARTHER NORTH of seed was grown from Yankton to the northern South Dakota. I have talked to you about Minnesota

Our supply line of

we received our

bushels of seed from the Minnesota Agricultural College, and I think every have sold for one of you know the value of this corn. seed purposes in the last eleven years hundreds of thousands of bushels of Minnesota 13 Corn, and it is the satisfactory kind. It always produces a good yield, with the highest protein contents of any corn. This makes it especially valuable for feeding and for hogging off. This corn should be planted for main crop from Aberdeen. South Dakota, to just as far south as the 13 ever since

first lot of five

We

corn belt extends. When you pass Yankton, South Dakota, we would not advise that you plant it for your entire main crop but plant a portion of your acreage to get your early feed, and to allow your huskers to start early before other varieties are ready to crib. To the people of Kansas, Oklahoma, southern Nebraska and other places where on account of the drought of 1918 you failed to grow corn, I would advise planting a quantity of this early, and by the first of August you can be feeding it. Price. 1 lb., 20c; 15 lbs., $1.50; 23 lbs., $2.75; 56 lbs., $5.00; 560 lbs., $45.00.

North Dakota White Dent This extremely early White Dent Corn has been thoroughly tried out in the extreme north and has made good, maturing in North Dakota in any ordinary season. In size like Minnesota No. 13, Yellow Dent, and, like the No. 13, stands up well even in the extreme North. Stalks grow to a height of seven feet, ears are up three feet from the ground, making it easily harvested with the Corn Binder. This Corn will outyield any other variety of Dent Corn that can be grown in the extreme North. It has been bred for yield and earliness, and will withstand more ‘extremes of weather than any other Corn grown. Might not be an ideal Corn for some of Iowa and Illinois farmers, who are used to the foot-long varieties, but North Dakota White Dent is a silver mine to the North Dakota, Minnesota and northern South Dakota farmer who has wanted to grow Dent Corn but could not* on account of length of season. Do not get the idea that this is a 10 to 20 bushel to the acre Corn and so low down that you cannot find it at husking time. It stands up well, seven feet, and yields, with reasonably good farming, 50 bushels to the acre. Our supply of this Corn grown in Yankton, Bon Homme and Douglas counties, South Dakota. Price, 1 lb., 20c; 14 lbs., $1.50; 28 lbs., $2.75; 56 lbs., $5.00: 560 lbs., $45.00.

Ear Tested Ear Seed Corn We

are equipped to and do test large quantities of all varieties of ear corn, taking from each ear three to five kernels, putting in the ear tested ear seed corn only those ears showing a perfect test. This requires expensive equipment and a large outlay of labor on each bushel, but in a year of uncertainty, where so

much depends on

the seed planted, it is generally advisable.to plant the ear tested seed. Price, $2.0© per bushel in excess of the single bushel price for Ear Seed of any variety.

Com

From



Rustler White Pent We planted a 100-acre field of Dent commencing on May 25, 1920, harvested shelled, and shipped two carloads before the 10th of November that graded No. 2 white on the terminal market. This is a grade that is seldom reached by any variety of corn I give you the until it has been in storage for nearly a year. above to determine its earliness. This Rustler White Dent can be planted safely from the North line of North Dakota When I say safely I mean that Rustler White Dent south. will produce a crop in any of that territory when any other It is an exceptional variety of Dent corn matures a crop. Rustler White

and

yielding corn, producing in this country this past season better than 50 bushels per acre. We have this seed grown as far North as Southeastern North Dakota. 1 lb., 20c; 14 lbs., $1.50; 56 lbs., $5.00; 280 lbs., $23.75; 560 lbs., $45.00.

Wisconsin No. 7 or Iowa Silver King— This extremely new valuable White Corn originated with the Wisconsin Agricultural College at Madison, Wis., and has been distributed by them over their state generally and over the whole Northwest to some extent. It is the largest early White Corn grown, the deepest kerneled; in fact, the best bred of any variety of White Corn. In Wisconsin it is considered more valuable than any of the yellow varieties on account of the increased yield over those varieties. In earliness it is equal to any

Corn, maturing perfectly in ninety days. It has been recommended by the Ames College for Northern Iowa under the name of Silver King, and is certainly king of the White Corn.

This should be planted any place north of Central Iowa to northern line of South Dakota. Height of stalks generally about 7 to 8 feet in this latitude. Ears up about 2}4 feet from An excepthe ground. Ears very uniform in size and shape. Per lb., 20c; 14 lbs., $1.50; tionally pretty White Corn. 28 lbs:, 52.75; 56 lbs., $5.00; 560 lbs., $45.00-

Sultanic Agricultural Society, Cairo, Egypt

The Gurney’s Model Dent and North Dakota White Dent received from you last year were two of the six most satisfactory of the many varieties of corn tried here. We desire to repeat the trial with pure seed this year, and I have cabled you today: “Ship five bushels each Gurney’s Model Dent, North Dakota White Dent by the way of Garvey Forwarding Company, Boston. Remittance coming.”

18 66

74

— HOUSE

OF GURNEY, YANKTON,



Wimple’s Yellow Dent Probably a larger acreage of Wimple’s Yellow Dent is planted in southeastern South Dakota than any other variety of corn. This corn originated in Union County about twelve years ago and has spread in all directions from there, giving good satisfaction anywhere south of central South Dakota, the southern tier of counties in Minnesota and all points south of there. It is a very deep, broad

S.

D.

— 1925

kerneled, rough corn, producing good sized ears and yielding It grows well up on the stalks, and stalks heavily to the acre. 7 to 9 feet high, depending on the location, soil. etc. Grown 1 lb., 20c; 14 lbs., $1.50; 28 ibs., $2.75; in South Dakota. 56 lbs., $5.00; 560 lbs., $45.00. Selected ears, per bu., $6.00; 700 lbs., $55,00.

rnmw

Dent

Reid’s Yellow we have grown and

selected a Reid’s Yellow Dent that would, be satisfactory to the planter in the southern tier of counties in South Dakota, northern Nebraska Reid’s and' northern Iowa, as well as those farther south. Yellow Dent is the ideal Corn where it can be safely grown. It is too late for any place north of the north line of Iowa and our strain of Reid’s is the earliest grown, so do not buy this variety and expect a crop to mature north of the north line of Iowa. Dakota Grown Reid’s, 1 lb., 20c; 14 lbs., $1.50; 28 lbs., $2.75; 56 lbs,. $5.00; 560 lbs., $45.00.

For the

last eight years

Dakota White Dent



About ten days later than Minnesota Yields with us about 65 bushels per acre. Will be safe to plant in any ordinary season as far north as Madison, Ears from 8 to 10 inches; very deep kernel; stalks S. D. from 7 to 9 feet high, makes lots of fodder. If you live north of the south line of South Dakota and south of Madison, Grown in South Dakota. S. D., you will be pleased with it. Price, per 58 lbs,, $4.50; 560 lbs., $42.50. No.

13.



Dakota Yellow Dent The description of Dakota White Dent fits this $6.50 corn exactly, except this is yellow. Don’t to order some of this if you are located in its territory. Grown in South It is the yellow Corn for that section.

fail

Dakota.

Price, per 56 lbs,, $4.50; 560 lbs., $42.50.

run ii u

Northwestern Dent of Northwestern Dent Corn is grown from place this and far north as corn matured. August 15th at the head of the list of the earliest varieties of dent corn, suitable in most sections for the early hogging off. The very best injiorthern sections for the main crop variety. In the southern sections, southern Nebraska, Kansas, etc., where on account of drought you failed to get a good crop last year, you should plant at least an acreage enough to supply your wants until the later varieties mature. This and August 15th are absolutely the earliest varieties of dent corn that will produce a paying crop, and you should take this into consideration in placing your orders for corn. The color of this corn is red. August 15th is a white-capped yellow corn. Price, 1 lb., 20c; 14 lbs,, $1.50; 28 lbs., $2.75; 56 lbs., $5,00; 560 lbs., $45.00.

Our supply Yankton to as

We

EIGHTY CENTS PER ACRE FOR DEPENDABLE SEED CORN H. F. Hull, Cherokee County, la. June 30, 1924. I want to apologize for the letter I wrote you on May 10th, in reference to seed corn, which I purchased from you. 1

made

the statement that the corn tested only

70%,

which it did in the indoor testing, but after planting it in the field, I have only been able to find one kernel that failed to sprout. This is certainly good for this kind of a year, and I have the best stand of corn in this neighborhood and I tell everyone that it is from Gurney seed.

1866

— HOUSE

OF GURNEY, YANKTON,

S.

D.

— 1925

75

Gurney’s August 15th Our supply

of seed of August 15th is practically all grown in Yankton County. None south of here. This earliest of all dent corns was originated by ourselves at Yankton, and although it is practically identical with Minnesota 23, ours was placed on the market one year previous to that variety. August 15th, as its name implies, is exceptionally early. It is as early, possibly a little earlier, than Northwestern Dent. It yields equally as well, or better, than that variety, depending, of course, on soil, care, etc. In color it is a white-capped yellow corn. The ears are almost perfect in shape, and every stalk producing a good ear. use this corn for earliest feeding, for hogging off, and for farther north main crop variety. This corn has given good results in central Canada. It has saved the pocketboolc of the southern farmer by furnishing him feed long before any other variety. Your hogs will enjoy a scrap with a good held of August 15th. Price, shelled and graded: 1 !b., 25c; 14 lbs., $1.50; 28 lbs., $3.00; 56 lbs., $5.50; 560 lbs., $47.00.

We



Squaw Corn, Blue and White Flint This is the old-fashioned Flint corn that is known by every one the country over as Squaw Corn. It yields an immense ear and an exceptionally large number of them. Plant an acreage of this corn, and you will be feeding new com In planting Flint corn figure about one bushel of seed to each six acres; before' you know it. stands planting a little thicker than other varieties, and is really one of the most valuable corns to grow, especially in a season when you want early feed. Price, 1 lb., 20c; 14 lbs., $1.50; 28 lbs., $2.75; 56 lbs., $5.00; 560 lbs., $45.00.

it



Dakota White Flint This is the White Flint used for Hominy and Hull Corn. For table quality, flavor and sweetness is the best variety of Indian Corn. Its ample foliage makes desirable for ensilage fodder. Dakota grown. Per 56 lbs., $7.00.

it



long.

Longfellow Flint A beautiful eight-rowed Yellow Flint, ears from ten to fifteen inches Very prolific and early. South Dakota and Nebraska grown. 1 lb., 20c; 14 lbs., $1.75;

28 lbs., $2.75; 56

lbs., $5.00;

King Philip Red Flint flints.

1

lb.,

560 lbs., $45.00.

—Very early.

About 10 days earlier than any of above 20c; 14 lbs., $1.75; 28 lbs., $2.75; 56 lbs., $5.00; 560 lbs., $45.00.

named



Red Cob Ensilage Corn Among all the varieties of Ensilage Corn, this one gives the greatest product of green forage per acre, amounting on rich land and proper cultivation to as much as 10 tons. The fodder is sweet, tender and juicy, growing to a height of 10 to 14 feet. It is easier for the average farmer, and the first cost is less, to sow the ordinary field corn for ensilage purposes, but the thoughtful farmer will consider quantity and quality of the products as of first importance. 1 lb., 20c; 14 lbs., $1.03; 56 lbs., $3.00; 560 lbs., $26.00.



Gehu Flint Absolutely a seventycorn. This means that you can plant the corn and on the seventieth day thereafter you can harvest matured

day

corn. This means a lot to you in 1925, because the 1924 crop w as short and high in price, and if you have saved any over, by planting this Gehu you can sell the old corn and depend on this new crop taking care of your wants early in T

GURNEY’S AUGUST

15th

the season.

We have planted this corn as late as This is an excellent corn the 25th of June and matured a perfect crop. for hogging down, producing as it does from two to five ears to the stock, Should plant at the rate of four acres of ears six to eight inches long. corn to one bushel of seed to get best results. We grow very large quantities of this corn each year for the extreme North, even well into Canada. Price, $5.50 per bushel. May 18, 1924 Mrs. Louise Arment, Jackson County, S. D. I received all my order from you and am well pleased with They came everything, especially the Everbearing Strawberries. They are all alive in such good shape and are such nice plants. and doing fine.

DeWOLF’S EXTRA PROLIFIC YELLOW CORN DeWolf’s Extra Prolific Field Corn—This is another production of M. J. DeWolf, now well past eighty years old. This corn matures well to the northern part of South Dakota and can be grown in the same district as Minnesota No. 13, but will outyield it. In 1920 it produced 150 bushels of ear corn to the acre in the seed trial grounds. We claim that it will outyield any variety that will mature in the same time on the same ground. This places it far ahead of other wellknown varieties. If this variety was planted alone, to the exclusion of all other varieties in the State of South Dakota

it wordd add to the wealth in the corn crop alone more than million dollars per annum. That would mean if you had planted DeWolf’s Prolific instead of your regular corn, rvrrvn would have hrmierht vou from one to three thousand Can you afford to let it pass another dollars more than it has. season? Can you afford to turn this proposition down, even if it costs you two or three dollars per bushel more for the seed than for other varieties? Price, shelled and graded:

fort:

1

lb., 35c;

14 lbs., $2.90; 28 lbs., $3.25; 5G ibs., $5.50; 560 Extra Select Ears, $7.00 per bushel.

Ebs., $50.00.

1866

70

— HOUSE

OF GURNEY, YANKTON,

S.

D.— 1925

GURNEY’S RAINBOW FLINT Matures This

is

Columbia

in British

a variety of corn that we are proud

—Seed Dakota Grown

It is the corn child was visiting us while

of.

that

we think more

of

than

attending the State Hortiother. Several years ago, Professor Hansen culture meeting. As usual, he was talking of the production and the method of production of Professor Hansen finally corn, and the Mendol of production. talked theories new varieties. made the statement that if we would secure somewhere a variety of inbred corn, the longer it variety, inbred just as another direction and another secure had been inbred the better; go in long so that there would be no danger of these two lots being related in any way; place each variety other; then detassel in separate planters, planting two rows of one variety, then two rows of the one of the varieties and save it for seed, that we would receive from this seed a remarkable yield of corn, but that we must not continue it beyond one year, as the chances were almost 1 to 1,000 tried this that the second year it would degenerate and show the bad traits of both parents. planted the seed as directed by him, and produced a wonby the growing of two flint corns. derful yield of remarkable, large ears of early maturing flint corn, of about every color you can think of. The yield was so great, and so much better than either parent, that we thought we would take that one chance and try it again. Time has proven that we struck the one chance in the thousand, and produced a wonderful flint corn. It is getting to be standard everywhere, as the largest producer of corn and fodder, the finest to look at, and one of the earliest to mature. It lias matured perfectly in British Columbia. It produces a remarkable yield in the South. And is the main crop for early hogging off in all sections of the country. It is not unusual to produce a very large Price, percentage of 14-inch ears of 14, 16 and 18 rows. Try it in the field and in the hog pen. 1 !b., 25c; 14 lbs., $1.50; 28 lbs., $2.75; 56 lbs., $5.00; 560 lbs., $45.00.

any

We

We

We

From Frank Hagedone, Fergus County, Mont. I have taken first prize for the last three years at the County and State Fairs with Gurney’s Rainbow Flint corn. In 1920, I took five first and three second prizes; in 1921, seven first. All from Gurney’s seed. I am going again this year.



Gurney’s Rainbow Flint Mr. Leaper of Platte County, me a picture of his little daughter, three and one-half years old, in the Rainbow Flint field at roasting ear time. Mr. Leaper tells us that Rainbow Flint is one of the best for his section of the country, and we want to tell Mr. Leaper that the picture is of a mighty nice little girl. Wyo., sends

Sweet Fodder— There is nothing better for summer and fall green feed or for curing for winter than Sweet Corn: Being sweet and palatable, cattle eat every part of. the stalks and leaves. Always a great favorite with dairy farmers, and excellent for soiling. Can be planted as other corn or sown thickly in drills or broadcast. Sow J-2 bushel per acre in drills, 1 to 1^ bushels broadcast. 15 lbs., $2.25; 50 lbs., $6.00; 100 lbs., $10.00



Primitive, or Husk Corn This is the original corn from which all the improved varieties were produced. About thirty years ago a friend of ours was traveling in Central Mexico in a district far removed from civilization and all human habitation he found this corn growing wild, just as it had doubtless been growing for many centuries before America was discovered. It is a very curious appearing corn, each separate kernel is enclosed in a husk and there is an outer husk over the entire ear. Large Pkt., 15c. of corn

and



South America’s Mammoth What would you think of corn stalks 17 feet high, that 2 >2 inches at the base, producing ears 12 to 14 inches long, and of immense caliper? Eari containing 28 rows, the stalks big and strong enough to make side posts for a child’s swini have grown them to this size in our trial grounds and we have attached the ropes and made swings of them. We exhibited at the South Dakota State Fair one year ten stalks and ears that weighed 82 lbs., the shortest stalk in this exhibit was 15 feet. We do not recommend this corn for general crops, but just for a novelty for exhibition purposes. We have had reports from North Dakota showing a 15-foot stalk in that state. If you want the real novelty in corn, try this. V3 pt., 15c; 1 lb., 35c.

Guy G. Frary, State Food and Drug Commissioner, Vermillion, S. D. Dec. 1,1924. I am sure you will be interested in a comment made in a letter I have just received from the Deputy Secretary of Agriculture of the State of Nebraska, Mr. Grant Shumway. He makes this comment upon your splendid nursery: “I think you have a wonderfuLnurswon est to my knowledge. ery at Yankton. One of the best in the entire

W

We

EAR OF RAINBOW, 16 INCHES LONG. SOME CORN!

Murdock have

been watching the Early Murdock for the 1 several years, and we have come to the conclusion that it a direct descendant of Minnesota No. 13. little larger e just a little later, probably one week; Gelds well and is excellent corn for any part of South Dakota or any po soutn of the north line of South Dakota. would 1 ,

A

We

plant Early

Murdock beyond the South Dakota

line.

:

It will

be one .of the main' varieties in the south two-thirds of this state and all states south of that point. South Dakota grown. Price, 1 lb., 20c; 14 lbs., $1.75; 28 lbs., $3,00; 56 lbs., $5.00; 560 lbs,, $45,00.

1866— HOUSE OF GURNEY,

YANKTON,

S.

D.— 1925

77

Popcorn About one farmer in ten grows Popcorn, even the little amount that is required for the children’s popping during the when it is enjoyed so much. Give the children this year a little spot in the garden where they can plant at least one pound 6f theJWhite Rice Popcorn for their own use this coming winter. I would bet you dollars to doughnuts that the little shavers will never let this popcorn bother you, but they will hoe and cultivate it and produce a greater money yield, per square rod, than you will in the best acre of your own cornfield. Give the kids a try at it. It will yield from eight to ten tons of fodder winter months,

per acre of as high feeding value as sweet corn. If matures very early, which is an of early feed for the stock. It can be planted fit least twice as thick as other varieties of corn and the yield of ear or shelled corn is usually equal to that of field corn. The market price is much better than for other varieties Plant at the rate of 6 to 8 quarts to the acre. of corn, and is always marketable. White Rice— 1/3 pt., 15c; lb., 25c; 14 lbs., 51.80; ST lbs„ 54.50; 100 tbs., $8.00. Red Rice-Fancy seed, bright red, y3 pt., 30c; lb., 65c.

advantage where you are going to be short

Japanese Hull-less Popcorn A hill of Japanese Hull-less produces as high as twenty ears of

corn, ears

small to medium,

rows irregular like Country GenIt is the tleman Sweet Corn. best of all the popcorns for popping purposes. Clear, white kernels popping to much greater bulk than other varieties. Much better flavor

popcorn.

and the

real

coming

1 lb., 30c; % lb., 20c;lbs., $7.00;

14 lbs., $2.25; 50 100 lbs., $12.00.

Bromus Inermis Dakota grown Seed only. New settlers west of the Missouri River in North and South Dakota and western Nebraska should use this grass almost exclusively on their land. An exceedingly valuable grass; succeeds and produces immense crops of high nutritive value on the sterile and arid plains of our Western States, growing luxuriantly on dry, sandy soils where other grasses would perish. It is perennial and once sown down will stand for ten years. It is one of the surest to obtain a catch, establishing itself very rapidly, so much so that a good hay crop can be had the first season, followed afterwards by an immense amount of succuOn and after the first season two crops a year can be had from it. lent pasturage. When fully grown the plant stands 4 to 5 feet in height and stools out freely. This grand grass has been highly enIt is ready to cut the latter part of June. dorsed by the Experiment Stations, a few of which we give below. Prof. Shaw of Iowa says: “This grass cannot be obtained too soon by the farmers of the West.” Notes on the Grasses and Forage Plants of Iowa, Nebraska and Colorado, published by the U. S. Department of Agriculture, says: “Bromus Inermis withstands drought and cold, and is perfectly adapted to conditions existing in Iowa. It makes an excellent growth, and more nearly reaches the ideal of a farmer’s grass than any other sort introduced in recent years.” Sow broadcast at the rate of 20 lbs. per acre (14 lbs. per bu.). Per lb., 25c; 10 Ibs., $2.00; 50 ibs., $8.00;

per 100

Ibs., $15.00.



Meadow

Fescue, or English Blue Grass One of the best of the so-called Meadow Grasses, and has so well adapted itself to our Northern and Western States as to have become invaluable; in fact, it thrives over as wide a range as any of our grasses, succeeding as far south as Tennessee. It is greedily eaten by all kinds of stock, is very fattening, and makes excellent hay. It is very hardy and succeeds in almost all soils, but attains its greatest Coming into use very early and again late in the perfection in moist, rich land. fall it should form a prominent part in all permanent nastures and meadow mixPer lb., 35c; 50 ibs., $11.00; 100 Ibs., $20.00. the bu.). to (22 lbs. tures. natural or permanent

— (Dactylis



Glomerata) It is of exceptional value for percrops. It is very early, coming in ahead of all other being cut, and endures close cropping by cattle. after grasses, recovers quickly All kinds of stock relish it greatly and if cut when it comes into flower makes all on. soils and attains its greatest perfection on well Thrives excellent hay. Per lb., 40c; 10 ibs., $2.80; (14 lbs. per bu.) strong, moist and clay lands.

Orchard Grass manent pastures and

100

From Frank

Timothy is, and you can grow it. A few years ago it was almost unknown to the farmers and stock growers of South Dakota;

Betschart, Fairbanks, Alaska.

Kentucky Blue Grass (June Grass, or Smooth-Stalked Meadow Grass; Fancy Cleaned) (Poa Pratensis) One of the first grasses to start in the spring; much relished by all



kinds of'stock, and succeeds on a great variety of soils, particularly on rich, moist lands. Fancy cleaned seed. (20 lbs. per Per lb., 70c; 20 ibs., $8.50; 100 ibs. ? $39.00. bu.). Red Top, Choice (Agrostis Vulgaris) Grows on almost all soils, but best on moist lands; should be included in all mixtures for seeding down wet or marsh lands. (15 lbs. per bu ). Per lb., 40c; 15 lbs., $4.50; 100 lbs., $25.00. English Rye Grass (Lolium Perenne) One of the best and most nutritious grasses for permanent meadows and pastures; it endures close cropping and recovers quickly after cutting. Does best on strong, rich soils. (24 lbs. per bu.). Per lb., 30c; 24 lbs., $5.25; 100 Ibs., $20.90. Italian Rye Grass An excellent variety producing ft nutritious feed in early spring; if sown early will produce a (18 lbs. per bu.). Per lb., 30c; large crop the same season. 10 Ibs.. $2.50; 100 Ibs., $20.00. Timothy (Phleum Pratense) Dakota grown; thoroughly recleaned; the best Timothy Seed on earth. You know what















hay

Ibs., $25.00.

Just finished seeding the Brome grass which I ordered from the Association. I found it to be the finest and cleanest seed we have ever had up here and I want you to send me at once two hundred pounds more of the same. The first lot of seed was out of the two carloads of assorted seed which you sent to this town.



for

today it is growing successfully in the eastern half of South Most farmers Dakota, from the south to the north line. have their Timothy and clover meadows and pastures. Our seed is all northern grown, and of the very best grade. (45 Pound, 20c; 10 ibs., $1.80; 50 lbs., $g o @0p lbs. per bu.). 100 Ibs., $9.00. Pasture Mixture There are certain desirable mixtures of various kinds of grasses that give you the best results on highlands or lowlands. As we have made a study of the proper mixtures for this purpose for many years, we can give you better results than if you selected your own. You can readily understand that it is our interest and desire to secure for you the best results from anything you purchase from us. Consequently, we spend lots of time and money in studying the various grasses and knowing where they wall succeed best. In ordering pasture mixture, state whether it is for high or low land or for hog pasture. Each of these require an entirely different mixture. By securing this best mixture, you can ordinarily pasture fifty per cent more stock per acre than you can with most of the ordinary or a single variety of grass, besides having a continuous pasture from early in the spring until it is covered with snow in the fall. Sow 25 lbs. per acre. Upland Pasture Mixture Per lb., 25c; 25 Ibs., $5.00; 50 Ibs., $9.00; 100 Ibs., $17.00. Lowland Pasture Mixture— Per 8b., 30c; 25 Ibs., $5.50; 50 Ibs., $10.00? 100 ibs., $19.00. Hog Pasture ^Mixture of grasses and clovers— Per lb., 20c; 25 Ibs., $2.75; 50 Ibs., $5.25; 100 Ibs., $9.75.





1866

— HOUSE

OF GURNEY. YANKTON,

S.

D.

— 1925

Jtlf!

Lawn from Gurney Seed

—South Dakota State Capitol Building

A photograph of the Capitol building at Pierre, South Dakota, together with the lawn surrounding same. These grounds were planted with our special lawn mixture in May; this photograph was taken in early September and shows something of the luxuriant growth of the grass and the beautiThe ful lawn surrounding this elegant new Capitol building. marvelous beauty of this perfect lawn produced in so short a time has created a great deal of favorable comment among the newspapers of the Northwest, some of them devoting columns to it. Gurney’s Lawn Grass will produce this kind of a lawn anywhere. South Dakota is to be congratulated on its fine building and beautiful lawn. Emil Petr, Colfax County, Neisr. May 17, 1924. I just received the Evergreen to take the place of the one that came damaged. This last tree came in fine condition.

Many

thanks for the square deal you gave me. your instructions in reference to priming

I shall follow trees.

my apple

KENTUCKY BLUE

ORCHARD



Capitol Lawn Mixture It is made up of the seed of several fine leaved grasses, selected and recommended by the experts of the Agricultural Department at Washington, after a series of most careful experiments extending over several years. can conceive -of no better authority on the subject than these painstaking, investigators. It may be said here concerning all these special purpose grass mixtures that they are based mainly on the' results of these field trials at the department and at various State Experiment Stations. The mixture offered here for lawn purposes has been tested thoroughly under the severe conditions of our climate, and has proven so generally satisfactory as to fully warrant us in claiming them to be unexcelled. Pound, 60c; 10 lbs., $4.75; 20 lbs. $9.00; 50 lbs. $21.00.

We

For shady places, certain.fine grasses are used that show a particular aptitude for maintaining their growth in the shade of trees. These grasses are generally shy seeders and consequently the seed is high priced, as will be noted in our price list, but the results obtained will fully warrant- the cost. Pound, 60c; 10 lbs., $4.75.

1866

— HOUSE

OF GURNEY, YANKTON,

S.

D.— 1925

79

Pedigreed Stock of Seed Grain have a great many

letters during the season from planters of seed grains, asking for a reduction in the prices at which the goods are quoted. think a word of explanation here would show the reasonableness of the charge which we make for these grains. There is a much larger cost attached to the production of these better grades of grain than to the grain I

We

grown in the ordinary way. In the recleaning there is a great shrinkage, as we take out all of the small grains and light ones, and give you none but the very best grade of grains. do no^believe that you can object to the price we charge for this extra fancy stock. There is but little profit to us in the grain at the prices at which we catalog them.

We

Flax, Minnesota, No. 25 This wilt-resistant Flax is a selection made by the Minnesota Experireceived from the Department of Agriculture at Washington, and in repeated trials at the Minnesota Station and points the Northwest it outyields all other varieties of Flax from two to four bushels per acre, and where other Flax wilts and fields are entirely destroyed this has stood perfectly. Not in all cases, but nearly all. If y° u can increase your yield even one bushel per acre by planting this Flax and have the added advantage of leaving your ground clean and tree from foul seed on account of planting absolutely clean Flax, you would be ahead if you could secure the common dirty Flax for nothing' 56 lbs., $4.00; 560 lbs., $39.00.

ment Station from stock

W

m

Buckwheat Buckwheat should be sown about the middle

of June, broadcast, at the rate of from one to three pecks per acre. Silver Hulled A great improved variety. It is in bloom longer, matures its crop sooner, and yields twice as much as the ordinary sort. In a great many sections of the United States Buckwheat is not a paying crop, if you figure on using it as you would other grains, like wheat or oats. There is no crop that will yield a greater amount of food for fowls than Buckwheat. We know of one case where one quarter-acre field furnished seed for over 300 chickens for three months. They were allowed to harvest the crop themselves. 1 lb., 25c; 12 lbs., 90c; 50 lbs.. $2.60; 100 lbs., $4.75; 1,000 lbs., $45.00. Japanese Larger seeded than Silver Hull. Seed black, good yielder. About equal to Silver Hull in all ways and for all purposes 1 lb., 25c; 12 lbs., 95c; 50 lbs., $2.75; 100 lbs., $5.00; 1,000 lbs., $48.00.





Theo. Thompson, Wilken Co., Minn. I

April, 1924.

bought 10 pounds of Cossack alfalfa seed from you in the Spring and sowed it on two and one-half acres. In 1921 I cut five hay and the second cutting gave me 453 pounds of clean seed. sold a portion of this for $180.00, and saved enough to plant 7

of 1920 loads of I

acres in the Spring of 1922. In the Spring of 1923, on account of a portion of the field being flooded for a long period, this part of the field looked dead. Before plowing it up, I examined the plants and found new shoots coming from the roots. At time of cutting, I could not tell where field had been flooded. I now have 27 acres of Cossack.

Spring Spring Rye

Rye

— In the spring of 1923 we advised everybody to plant an increased

acreage of spring rye on account of the low acreage of fall rye planted in the fall of 1922. The result was a normal acreage of rye, the fall and spring combined, and a normal yield. The growers of spring rye find that it yielded equal in bushels per acre to the fall rye and was a desirable, reasonably profitable crop. We are again advising that where you have failed to plant a sufficient acreage of fall rye or fall grain, you can still balance your farm work by increasing the acreage of spring rye. I think we have refunded more money on account of being unable to fill your orders for Spring Rye in past years than any other one item that we list. It seems that most every farmer w ants to plant some of this but has been unable to secure the seed. In trying to overcome this difficulty we planted last spring a large acreage of the Spring Rye and harvested a very good crop. In fact, the yield was better than thirty bushels per acre. We have saved all the seed of this genuine Spring Rye, and think we have ample to fill all your orders this season with strictly first-class seed. Spring Rye is equal to Fall Rye for all purposes excepting summer pasture. It allows you to increase the acreage of small grains where you have failed to plant all the rye and fall wheat that you wanted at the proper time. Our last planting of Spring Rye was the 12th of April, and on account of a very dry April did not germinate for more than ten days after that. It can be sown as late as oats and nearly as late as barley, and still produce a good crop. For bread making purposes it would be identical in value with the Fall Rye. Sow from five to eight pecks per acre, depending on the average rainfall in your locality. Where the rainfall is apt to be deficient sow a less amount of all kinds of small grain than where the rainfall is ample. You will secure a better yield. Per lb., 20c; 14 lbs., 90c; 28 lbs., $1.10; 56 lbs., $2.00; 560 lbs., $17.50. r

Winter or Fall Rye This valuable forage plant produces pasture from early in the spring until late in the fall if sown in the spring. It seldom produces any head and gives you good pasture all summer. It is also an In sowing the same variety in September it excellent fertilizer, plowing it under in mid-summer. produces a crop of seed for the next year. 14 lbs., 80c; 56 lbs., $1.75; 560 lbs., $16.50.

A Desirable Hog Pasture of the best quick growing hog pastures may be made by sowing one bushel of Fall Rye, 5 pounds of Dwarf Essex Rape and 10 pounds of White or Yellow blossomed Sweet Clover to the acre. Mix, sow and drag in well in early spring; the fall rye and rape makes an all summer pasture and the sweet clover will give remarkable results for the next year. This pasture mixture for hogs has given good returns in increased pork production; you cannot grow hogs profitably without ample pasture. This has been demonstrated many times. print a large bulletin, “ It’s free and if you are a grower of hogs you should have it. It helps.

One

We

SPRING RYE

Eighty Cents per Acre for Dependable Seed

HOGGINDOWN.”

Com

YANKTON,

1866— HOUSE OF GURNEY,

SO

S.

D.— 1925

Barley testing

many

(New Barley)

—For several

years the Minnesota State Experiment Station has been breeding and varieties of barley with a view to producing 'an improved sort that would lead all other kinds in the matter of This ambition, the station considers, has been realized in the new six-rowed yield. variety here offered under the name of University No. 105. In comparative tests covering a period of several years and made side by side with the best known and most popular varieties, it has proven to be the heaviest yielder, and from any standpoint a most valuableacquisition. Itisearly,uniforminmaturingandpure.48 lbs., $1.25; 480 lbs., $11.50. Odebrucker Barley In this age of improvement in grain, barley has come in for its share of attention, and experiments have shown wonderful progress in securing better grades and yields. The Wisconsin Agricultural College has taken a leading part in the improvement of barley, and in introducing the Odebrucker they are beyond question several years ahead in improvement of all other varieties. The Odebrucker is a better color, heavier yielder and the very best barley that can be grown. The seed we offer is produced from seed secured direct from the Wisconsin Agricultural College and the quality is certainly fine, and we ask all our intended customers to send to us for a sample *of it, which we will be glad to submit. The quantity of available seed of this new variety is not large, and we would advise all barley growers to make their orders early for this. 48 lbs., $1.25; 480 lbs., $11.50. Beardless Barley This barley will mature in 60 days from date of sowing under ordinary conditions. A barley without beards. This must be admitted by all as a very Most of you have threshed barley and some of you have been in the desirable thing. stack and you know what bearded barley is. The greatest advantage lies in the extreme earliness, which makes it absolutely desirable, if not indispensable, for early feeding when Being a sport from the old bearded barley, there may appear a few old grain is scarce. heads in the field showing beards. 12 lbs., 75c; 48 lbs., $1.75; 240 lbs., $8.00. Blue Hulless Barley Has no hulls. Earliest and best hog feed grown. Yields immense crops. Better for feeding purposes than other barley. Plant for earliest feed. 15 lbs., 85c; 24 lbs., $1.50; 48 lbs., $2.50; 240 lbs., $10.00; 480 lbs., $19.00. White Hulless Barley (See colored photo, page 68) Has neither beards nor hulls, extremely early, making it very valuable for hog feed, yields immense crops that thresh the hull just as wheat does, better and richer for feeding purposes than any other from out This barley is also used in large quantities for bread making purposes and makes barley. an excellent bread, normally producing from two to three times the yield of the best wheat 15 lbs., 85c; 24 lbs., $1.50; 48 lbs., $2.75; 240 lbs., $11.00; 480 lbs., $21TQ.

University, No, 105









Bearded Speltz or makes a good crop with almost any condition of soil and It is neither wheat, rye nor barley, and yet it appears climate. It is more like wheat than any to be a combination of these.

Emmer

Speltz is claimed kinds of animals seem to thrive on it. to be ahead of corn, superior to oats and more profitable than wheat. Yields 80 to 100 bushels of richer food than corn, besides giving as much as four tons of good hay per acre. of the others mentioned. For fattening cattle, poultry, horses, Excellent for pasture and can be fed in the green state. As sheep, pigs, etc., it is claimed to be ahead of other grains; in green grass hay food it often gives 100 leafy stalks from one seed, which shows its heavy stooling properties. The heads are somewhat similar to two-rowed barley, the spikeless being separated from each other in such a manner that the crop is not easily injured by the weather. It is a heavy yielder. Will grow well and produce enormous crops on land where wheat will not grow. 25 lbs., $1.00; 50 lbs., $2.00; 100 lbs., $3.20; 500 ibs., $14.00. It

fact, all

Dwarf Essex Rape This forage plant has rather forced its attention on the grower of stock as the seedsmen, generally, have neglected to tell of its value. A great many farmers have realized its value, and made use of it for a number of years, but the percentage of people planting it is so small that I want to impress it on you, especially this season, that the Dwarf Essex Rape will grow and thrive, and be profitable in so many places on your farm where you are not getting the full benefit of that land, that you should watch for every place, no matter how small, and plant this rape seed. In the spring when you are sowing small grains, sow it at the rate of *4 pounds per acre with your grain. This will furnish valuable pasture after harvest, and on account of the start it has before harvest, requires but little moisture in the latter part of the summer to make a good crop. Plant it with fall rye at the rate of about three pounds to the acre in the months of April or May, and it will make you a good pasture with the rye in summer. Plant it by itself at the rate of 5 lbs. per acre and see the immense yield of forage it will produce.’ Sow it at the rate of 3 lbs. per acre with your last cultivation of corn. This is undoubtedly the most profitable place to sow rape seed. If you are hogging the corn down, the hogs will clean the rape as well as the corn. If you husk your corn and pasture the corn stalks all kinds of stock eat it readily, and this gives them green food with the dry. Dw arf Essex Rape is the only variety that is valuable. We would advise placing your order early. Price: 1 lb,, 25c; 10 lbs,, $1.50; 25 lbs., $3.00; 50 lbs., $5.00; 100 lbs,, $8.75. r

r

A

Proper 7

;

DWARF ESSEX JRAFE

Hog

Pasture

for the least money. Something you may turn the hogs on soon after planting, something that you may use and get value received from this season. If that is w'hat you are looking for sow 56 Ibs. of Fall Rye, 5 Ibs. Dwarf Essex Rape and 10 Ibs. White or Yellow Blossomed Sweet Clover per acre. Mix thoroughly if sowing by hand if by machinery, mix rape and clover for one sowing and plant the rye separately. This insures an even stand. Price packed separately, right portions, 100 Ibs,, $6.00; 500 Ibs., $27.50,

1866

— HOUSE

OF GURNEY, YANKTON,

S.

D.— 1925

81

Millet Early Fortune

—This has come to be one of the most valu-

ible crops that the

farmer can

raise,

the seed being the richest

md

most valuable stock food that can be produced, while ;he hay is very valuable for stock. A very much prized peculiirity of this millet is that the seed ripens while the hay is yet ?reen, when, if cut properly, can be threshed for seed, while ;he hay makes excellent fodder after being threshed. Pound, 20c; 100 lbs., $4.25. Liberty Millet (German) luces a large crop of

hay

—Planted

on good land, pro-

or forage during the

summer months

md leaves the ground in the finest condition for wheat. s

no larger yielding forage plant.

(Bushel, 50 lbs.) stantly changing. LOO lbs., $4.25

Seed

There

valuable for poultry. x bushel to the acre. Values conSow /i Write for prices. 1 lb., 20c; 50 lbs., $2.25; is



The New Siberian The most wonderfully productive and satisfactory forage plants possessing in a superior deall the essential merits of any of the older sorts, besides many other points of excellence that distinguish it and render it a most valuable addition to the list of forages and which destines it to take front rank if not lead all the rest. It is said to have come from (Russia, which would, of course, give it vigor and hardiness not possessed by those originating in a warm climate. 1 lb., 25c; 50 lbs., 4^. 25 ; 100 lbs., $4.25. gree



Kursk Millet This very valuable millet is one sent out by the Department of Agriculture several years ago. We find that produce more hay in the dryer regions than any other variety of millet you can plant. The color of the seed is red like the Siberian, only a little darker in color. It yields heavy crops of seed and forage. especially advise the planting of this in any section where the rainfall is not ample and regular. Sow 20 pounds to the acre. Price, 1 lb., 25c; 50 lbs., $2.25; 100 lbs., $4.00. it will

We



Japanese Millet All things considered, we call this the most valuable thing in our whole list of forage plants. It has oeen sold under different names, as “Billion Dollar Grass,” “Steel Trust Millet,” etc. We recommend it for the following First, it makes more hay than German Millet or reasons: other. Second, although it grows so large, sometimes seven or eight feet high, the hay is of the most excellent qualThird, it is adapted to all secity, superior to corn fodder. It does well on low tions and a great success wherever tried.

my

ground. Fourth, two crops a season may be cut from it, or, if left to ripen, it will yield almost as many bushels of seed per Fifth, it requires less seed per acre than any acre as oats. other millet, 20 to 30 pounds being sufficient. Sixth, it makes Bne silage, especially if mixed with soja beans or sand vetch. Seventh, it is highly endorsed and recommended by the U. S. Department of Agriculture, by all Experiment Stations and by seedsmen generally. Be sure to order of us, as we are headquarters. Treat it exactly as you would German millet, only sow it a little earlier for best results. know it will please you. 1 lb., 25c; 10 lbs., $1.00; (40 lbs. per bu.) 10 lbs., $2.25; 100 lbs., 54.25.

We

—We

Hog Millet have tried in the last two catalogs to discontinue the use of the words “hog millet.” The millet known as hog millet is also known as Broom Corn, Manitoba and Early Fortune Millet. It comes in several colors, the clear white, which is the genuine Hansen’s Siberian Proso, the yellow, the red and the black. All of these millets yield immense quantities of seed which is exceptionally valuable for feeding purposes. There are several varieties of Proso; we are listing them under the name of Proso and under their old names which should not have been given them; it would be just as reasonable to call corn “cow corn” as it was to name the Proso “hog millet.” These Prosoes are not as desirable for hay as for grain and millions of pounds of this grain is used in the Siberian and Russian countries for human food; in fact, we have used it and found it extremely palatable. 1 lb., 20c; 10 lbs., 75c; 50 lbs., $1.75; 100 lbs., $3.00.

Professor Hansen’s Siberian Proso There are a number of varieties of Proso brought over by Prof. Hansen previous to this one. This is the best, and other varieties should not be confused with this large seeded Hansen’s White Siberian Proso. In Professor Hansen’s various trips to the Siberian country he has many valuable forage plants, vegetables and flowers to the United The Siberian Proso is one of the very valuable ones. The protein contents of Proso compare very favorably with that of wheat and it is an excellent food for human consumption. It can be ground with wheat and makes excellent bread, and it alone makes one of the very best of breakfast foods, higher in food value than probably any grain now used for the purpose.

brought States.

“A large-seeded white-grain millet of the Proso type grown by the Kirghiz Tartar nomads in the Semipalatinsk region as a grain for their stock; also grown extensively by the Kirghiz for themselves, produced in their climate, where the annual rainfall is about eight inches. It will probably yield well on the driest upland in the driest years in all our western states. When it is hulled and cooked for the table the Russians call it ‘ Kasha,’ and it is very extensively used in European Russia, Siberia, Turkestan, Mongolia, and other parts of Asia, especially the driest regions. “This variety was extremely productive here at Brookings the past season, the yield being over four bushels of grain from one pound of seed sown thinly at the rate of five pounds per acre.” This is a specially valuable grain. For feeding stock, poultry, and everything of that kind Proso is equal to or better than the wheat.

Proso is also specially valuable as a summer catch crop, something that can be planted very late. It can be planted as late as July 15th and mature a crop of grain and hay. Do not consider that Proso is going It is a grain crop, to produce much hay to the acre or be of great value. the hay or straw being equal to, at least, that of wheat or oats straw.

still

There are so few later catch crops that Proso will be used extensively on land that has had an early crop removed from it or where it has been drowned out and not in shape to work until mid-summer. Sow 12 pounds per acre. Price, 1 lb., 30c; 3 lbs., 60c; postpaid; 10 lbs., 80c; 25 lbs., $1.50; 50 lbs., $2.25; 100 lbs., $4.25.

PROFESSOR HANSEN

Seed Oats for Spring 1925 Owing to the light weight and generally poor grade of the [924 oat crop, good quality seed oats is going to be very scarce. iVe have stored in our warehouses very Tiigh quality oats of the various varieties listed on this page and page 82, and at the easonable prices you should not hesitate to buy liberally.

Kherson Oats We

Made

larger yields and weighed better than any others. >elieve it to be the very best for the Northwest. This oat is

Certified Seed Potatoes

undoubtedly identical with the yellow oat known as Sixty-Day Oat. There were two importations from Russia; one has come out under the name of Sixty-Day and the other as Kherson. They both outyield all others. Our seed from this variety is secured from seed of the original Taylor importation, and is absolutely pure Kherson Oats. It is a smaller oat than most and takes at least one peck less per acre for sowing. This oat should be largely planted, as the difference of 10 to 15 days in earliness of maturity will escape the rust period; save that much risk of winds, hail and bugs. It also lengthens the harvest season, allowing you to get along with less nigh-priced help. Price, 32 lbs., $1.00; 64 lbs., $1.80;

320

lbs., $8.50.

Are Worth the Difference

in Cost.

82

1866— HOUSE OF GURNEY, Hulless Oats

YANKTON,

S.

D.

— 1925

—Ottawa 480 Liberty

See Pages 67 and 68 for Hulless Oats

lowar This is another selection by the Iowa Agricultural College of Ames, which is of the same type, earliness of maturity, highyielding, and a descendant of the Kherson, as is the Iowa 103. We had a forty acre field of this on one of our own farms this past season of 1923, and with the ordinary farm care, it gave us better than seventy bushels per acre. It was truly a beautiful field, stood just as high as the enclosure fence and not a weed in sight in the field. wished to convert this field into Cossack alfalfa and sowed eight pounds of Cossack per acre with the oats. After harvesting the oats, and before fall, we got three-fourths of a ton

We

Cossack hay per acre, and it has furnished lots of pasture I believe the lowar is bound to rank high as an oat with the hull on. Price 16 lbs., 70c; 32 lbs., $1.05; 320 lbs., $9.50. of

since.



C. S. Greengras, Marshall County, S. D. I am enclosing a photograph of some of my Flint Corn, and Mr. Gurney, the tree is one your Father sent me \Vhen he was too busy to write, but wrote me later that he wanted me to have one of his little trees instead I always called it Father Gurney. of a letter. It It is near my window and I cannot tell you how much I enjoy it. speaks a message that I fail to express in words.

Regenerated Swedish Select Oats The past season the new Regenerated Swedish Select Oats have made They are certainly the leading late some wonderful yields in the Northwest. It is oats at the present time and it is probable they will continue to be so. not unusual to see fields growing 100 bu. per acre and weighing as high as 45 Our stock of this oat is strictly pure and at the lbs. per measured bushel. low price you should sow a good field. 32 lbs., 95c; 160 lbs., $4.50; 320 lbs., $8.50.

Iowa’s 103 Earliest White Oat For the last several years we have been getting some very satisfactory reports of yields of the New White Kherson, or New Iowa 103, and have decided that it is absolutely the best of all the early oats from point of color, earliness and yield, consequently we are strongly urging that you plant a quantity of it this year. Our stock is from seed furnished by the Iowa Agricultural College in 1915 to the growers and they have not grown any other variety on their place, so that it is the genuine Iowa 103, or White Kherson. Under date of March 3, 1916, the following letter was received from Professor

Buchanon, Secretary and Director of Experiments of the Iowa College: “Your letter of February 17th, in regard to Iowa 103 Oats, received. This is an early White Oats originated here at the Experiment Station by the pure line selection method. After proving its superiority in the Experiment Station test it was distributed to a large number of farmers for J.

co-operative test throughout the state.

We Pay

In 119 co-operative

—A

REGENERATED

Swedish select

Descendant of the Kherson

conducted in the years of 1913, 1914 and 1915 the Iowa 103 gave an average of 49.94 bushels per acre, and the home varieties an average of 46.01 bushels per acre, making a difference of 3.93 bushels in favor of Iowa 103. In 32 of the 119 tests the Iowa 103 gave an average yield of 54.4 bushels per acre, and the Kherson an average of 51.50 bushels per acre, making a difference of 2.81 bushels in favor of Iowa 103. I should state here that the Kherson is the parent variety. In 15 of 119 tests the Swedish Select was the home variety used, and the Iowa 103 gave an average of 5.25 bushels more than the Swedish Select. In 11 of the 119 tests the Early Champion was the home variety used, and the Iowa 103 gave an average The of 2.8 bushels more per acre than the Early Champion. demand for this Oat is becoming very large, as in many places, it has outyielded the more common varieties by a wide margin. tests

“J. BUCHANON, Secy. & Director of Experiments.” 8 lbs., 35c; 16 lbs., 60c; 32 lbs., 95c; 320 lbs., $8.50.

Transportation Charges on All Si ngle Pound and Smaller Quantities Quoted in the Catalog

1866

— HOUSE

OF GURNEY, YANKTON, Not

Victory Oat The greatest attempt ever made to increase per acre production of food stuff was made by the Canadian Department There has been of Agriculture during and since the war. some remarkable results there were also many failures. The most remarkable increases attained by and through new varieties is the new wheat Ruby, that seems to be able to crowd all other varieties of wheat off the map and is adding millions of dollars of agricultural wealth to our wheat growing states and making wheat growing states out of some that had Then came the introduction passed through the wheat stage. of the Hull-less Oat an oat that threshes as clean as wheat or rye and with a yield this past season of 2,295 pounds of solid oat grain per acre, this grain testing 51 pounds per measured Especially valuable to the oat meal mills and the bushel. grower of hogs and calves. Now we are placing for your con-

S.

D.— 1925

83

Hull-less

sideration and judgment the new Victory oat. This comes from the Canadian Department of Agriculture and as its name implies, was introduced at about the time of the armistice. It comes well recommended, with a high yield record, a straw that is strong, able to withstand the storms that are often disastrous to the oat fields, strong enough to hold up safely to maturity the heavy heads of grain, early enough to be classed as first early. What more may we ask of this oat? Our entire supply of this Oat was grown for us in Canada, crop of 1922. Produced from certified seed and each bag or package of this oat will contain our certificate of purity. Sow 2 bushels per acre at Yankton or south of this point. If you live North and West reduce quantity of seed per acre. Price: 10 lbs., 80c; 32 lbs., $1.70; 160 lbs., $6.25; 320 lbs., $11.50; 640 lbs., $22.00.



_

;

Northern Grown Seed Potatoes We

have placed in our immense potato storage warehouses our usual supply of strictly fancy seed potatoes, northern grown, and the very best for seed purposes. The person who plants an acreage of potatoes each year has learned from experience that a change of potato seed from the north to the Consequently we south pays better than any other seed. grow. our seed stock in the extreme north, and the big potato grower farther south sells off all his own crop,, securing new

many.

northern stock each season, in this way often increasing his are trimming down our list of. varieties yield 50 per cent. of that of a few years ago, as it is not profitable to have too

We

Bliss

I

attended an auction sale the other day and saw a

lot of potatoes sold. The quality of these potatoes was of the poorest, such as we would leave' on the field or gather up and screen out for stock food, probably did not yield more than 25 to 50 bushels per acre. The soil on which they were produced should have given 200 bushels of strictly first-class potatoes to the acre. The party growing these had planted and replanted each season and I suppose had kept the small, or seed potatoes, as he would call it, until they were entirely run out. Prices on all field seeds are subject to change

this fall

without notice.

Triumph Potato

This .is positively the earliest potato grown, except Gurney’s White Harvest. It is the variety you find on the market first in the spring from the south. A nearly round red potato. On account of its earliness it brings the highest price of any potato offered', and as the seed for this variety for the entire south is grown each season in the north, the demand is always heavy for than most it for seed purposes and consequently higher priced other varieties. It yields enormously. have had reports of 650 bushels per acre, and it is not uncommon to take out fifteen

.

'

We

good marketable potatoes from one hill. It is freer from scab than most potatoes. The stock we are offering is of specially fine quality, strictly Red River grown, everyone should plant a quantity of these for first early. Lb., 35c; 3 lbs., 75c, postpaid; IS lbs., 80c; 60 lbs., $2.00; 300 lbs., $9.00; 600 lbs., $17.00.

Green Mountain This remarkably heavy yielding white potato has forced its to the front in the northern sections, as one of the main crop varieties of late potatoes. It has produced some very remarkable yields, especially in North Dakota and Minnesota, and is adaptable I believe the Green Mountain to almost any part of the country. averages larger in size than any potato of its class. There are very few small unmarketable potatoes in a field of them. This potato is of excellent quality after the first of January and is It is a good keeper, and especially good for baking purposes. commands readily the highest market, prices. 1 lb., 35c; 3 lbs., postpaid, 75c; is lbs., 80c; 60 lbs., $1.40; 300 lbs., $7,00; 800

way

lbs., $13.00.

Irish

Cobbler

am

quoting from Bulletin No. 176 of State College of Agriculture, on page 700 in a table of a threeyear test, indicating that, the Irish Cobbler is the highest yielding On page 718 they again refer to it early potato at Brookings. as the best yielding early variety grown in South Dakota. It is grown in every part of the State and is desirable for early and fall markets. This is a variety of eastern origin that took Horace Greeley’s advice to “Go West, young man, go west.” It went west and is prosperous. It has found the climate that it desired and is even more profitable in this western country than in the east, the home of its birth. The Irish Cobbler is fast becoming one of the great northwestern market potatoes. It is second early, nearly round, pure white, a good keeper, and of very excellent quality, always cooking dry and mealy. On account of the short, stocky growth of the vine, this potato can be planted closer together than most Lb., 35c; varieties, ordinarily about one foot apart in the row. 3 lbs.. 75c, postpaid; 15 lbs., 89c; 60 lbs., $1.50; 300 lbs., $6.95; 600 lbs. y $12.93. I

Six

Weeks

Potatoes

—This

remarkably

early

Potato

is

especially valuable to the market gardener, and for those with a small garden who grow for extra early Potatoes only, It is ready for use ten days ahead of Early Ohio; of excellent quality -; abundant bearers and a good keeper. In shape it is identic; 1 with the Early Ohio; color much lighter; skin, very smooth, with few very wi shallow eyes. This should be planted largely and you 'll be well repaid with results 1 lb., 25c; 3 lbs., 75c, postpai ; 15 lbs., 80c; 60 lbs., $1.90; 300 lbs., $7.50; 600 lbs., $13.95 ,

RfSrs.

John Neilscn, Cody, Wyo.

l am enclosing my regular order could not be satisfied with any other seed. Yours have always. been fine and I am really proud of my nice garden, -K Your flowers do very well here. I have 1. had Pansies bloom - in my garden most of the Winter and we have some real tcrs here.

Certified Seed Potatoes are

Worth the

Difference in Cost.

1866— HOUSE OF GURNEY,

YANKTON,

D.

S.

— 1925



Early Ohio Early Ohio is the most popular early Potato in We have more calls for it than any other variety. this country. Every potato grower knows what it is, and knows just about what It is the Standard Extra Early the counit will do in his locality. We will venture try over, and other varieties are measured by it. to say that not one farmer in ten the country over who thinks he has Early Ohio has pure stock. Most of them do not know that they are mixed. But Early Ohio is an old variety and has become Farmers and frightfully mixed throughout the United States. market gardeners better sell off their own Ohio and get some pure. They are grown under conditions that make them cost more than common stock. They are selected, with the utmost care and the result is grand, such as to delight every one who knows and ap1 lb., 35c? 3 lbs., 65c, postpaid? 15 preciates a good Potato. lbs., 80c? 60 lbs., 51.60; 300 lbs., $7.25; 600 !bs., $14.00.



Rural New Yorker No. 2 Well known now the country ovei and very largely planted for profitable main crop, fturals are

now quoted

in all the leading

Burbanks and other standard

markets of the country along with sorts, and usually they are quoted

They

are certainly more profitable tc made its appearance as sent out it introduced an entirely distinct class of Potatoes, unknown up to that time. The class is characterized by long, rather spindling vines, with dark colored stalks, dark green leaves and purple blossoms tubers nearly round, higher than Burbanks. raise. in 1889

When

Rural No. 2

by the Rural

New

first

Yorker

;

flattened, with very smooth, pure white skin, uniform size, quite numerous in the hill, always very attractive in appearance. Oui stock of Rural Yorker this year is a splendid one, and oui prices are certainly very reasonable. 3 lbs., 75c, postpaid; 15 lbs., 80c; 60 lbs., $1.50; 300 lbs., $7.00; 600 lbs., $13.00.

New

RURAL NEW YORKER (SeeColored Plate, Inside Front Cover)

Gurney’s Bugless Potato has for one more year absolutely proven that it is more immune from bugs than

g,ny other potato

it is seldom damaged by bugs, and that happens only in bad seasons or on extremely

grown, that

poor ground, or in very small patches. had grown for us this past season fields of Bugless potatoes that produced considerably over three hundred bushels

We A

single measured field of five acres brought to our cellars more than fifteen hundred

per acre.

bushels of marketable tubers that we sold on the market for just as

100 ACRES or more money than any other -potato grown, kept better Why should we conof equally as good quality. tinue to grow other varieties of late potatoes subject to damage by bugs, lower yields and of inferior quality? We grew on a piece of our land adjoining the city of Yankton a ten-acre field of Bugless. Adjoining this field on the west end was a fraction of an acre of Early Ohios, planted by the adjoining landowner. There was six feet between the During last row of Bugless and the first row of Early Ohios. the growing season the owner of the Early Ohios and his entire our own field examined day I personally family picked bugs. after day, and I did not find during the entire season one the yield and Bugless field by bugs, in the single leaf damaged at the end of the season was satisfactory. Get into the Bugless game. Plant potatoes that will fill your cellars and your pocketbook. Plant potatoes that produce very few small ones. Plant potatoes that market better than others and taste better. PRICE—1 lb., 35c; 5 lbs., postpaid, $1.30; 15 lbs., by express, $1.40; 30 lbs., $1.75; 60 lbs., $2.50; 300 lbs., $10.00; 600 lbs., $19.00. Ten Dollars Cash Premium Every year we pay to someone $10.00 in cash for the largest Bugless potato grown from our seed. Remember, send your potatoes to reach us by December 1st, and the check for ,$10.00 will go to the winner on Decem-

much

BUGLESS IN MOUNTAINS OF IDAHO

and are



Gurney’s Bugless This picture of the Idaho bugless field was taken on oui western auto trip. We saw many such fields and the acreage of this variety is increasing each year. The demand for the large Idaho baked potato is increasing and as Bugless has both size and quality, it’s the variety they want. Within the next few years it will be the leading potato.

Miss fVSargaref Fagan, Judith Basin County, Mont. Nov. 23, 1924. Last Spring I ordered one pound of Bugless potatoes. These were received in a frozen condition. I wrote you and you immediately mailed another pound. I had a patch of Early* Ohios and Cobblers and planted the Bugless alongside of them. I sprinkled the Ohios and Cobblers with Paris-Green until I was sick of the job and found when I dug the potatoes from these varieties that they were small and scabby. I then dug the Bugless and got two hundred pounds of lovely, clean potatoes. The bugs never ate the vines. I am sending you the largest one to compete for your $10.00 prize. Whether or not I get that, I have a prize in those potatoes. They are the best yielders and nicest eating of any I have yet raised. I sold $10.00 worth of Squash from one hill of the Hubbard seed. One Squash weighed thirty-two pounds and one of the Gurney Ballhead Cabbage weighed twenty-

pounds.

Sweet Potatoes These Sweet Potatoes are the Early Jersey variety and the mos‘ satisfactory for northern planting. We can furnish you for shipment about April 1st the seed Sweet Potatoes. If you care to grou your own plants, it is necessary to plant the potatoes, grow th< sprouts and transplant just as you would tomatoes. The potatoef should be planted by the 10th of April, the sprouts transplanted from the 15th of May to as late as July 1st. The potatoes must b( planted immediately on their arrival as they decay rapidly at tha time of the year. If you do not care to grow your own plants w< can furnish the plants; and refer you to the greenhouse section foi prices. Potatoes, per ib., 40c; 5 lbs., $1.70; 10 lbs., $2.90.

HOUSE OF GURNEY, YANKTON,

1800-

S. ID.

1925

Sudan Grass Sudan Grass was introduced into the United States in 1909 from Sudan under the name of Garawi. One-half pound of seed was received, and the results were so very ^

promising that plans were immediately made for testing it out thoroughly in all parts of the United States. As a result of these tests, the Department of Agriculture reports that Sudan Grass will be of the greatest value in, the. Central States, and especially in the parts of Texas, Kansas, Oklahoma, Nebraska and Colorado that are deficient in rainfall. These dry regions have no other satisfactory hay crop and Sudan Grass will be of immense value there. Sudan Grass is strictly an annual and dies each year like millet and must be seeded again each spring. This makes it fit admirably into any system of rotation, and while it does not benefit the soil like legumes, it does afford a change in crop and this is a good thing for the soil. Sudan Grass is tall, reaching a height of from 7 to 9 feet. The stems are very sm;ftl and are rarely thicker than a lead pencil. The plant stools wonderfully and produces, under favorable conditions, as many as 100 stalks from a single root. ,

Makes good when it is dry; makes better when it rains. Produces from 3 to 5 tons of hay per acre when planted in 3-foot rows.

Takes about 4 pounds

of seed per acre to plant in 3-foot

rows.

Can be

cut from tw o to four times per season. Stock eat it in preference to all other hays including, T

alfalfa.

Analyzes 9.13 per cent protein. Has been grown successfully in all kinds of climate under all

sorts of conditions.

Prices: 1 lb., 30c; 3 lbs., 75c, postpaid; 10 lbs., $1.60; 50 lbs., $6.00; 100 lbs., $10.00.

Sudan

SUDAN OVER

7

—Wonderful Value to the Dairyman

Sudan has demonstrated its value above most other forage plants for just ordinary hay purposes. Most planters estimate its value for the first crop which on ordinary, land in an average season will yield up to four and one-half tons of dry hay per acre. There is almost an equal value in the second crop. In some places this matures for a second cutting of hay, but in my estimation its greatest value is green pasture for the cows. At about this time of the yearpastures are dry or only producing about one-half feed for the stock pasturing on it. This pasture supplemented by a fair acreage of Sudan will keep up the quality' and quantity Try it. of the milk flow.

FEET HIGH

Canada Field Peas am

from experience and observation that Canada Field Peas planted at the rate of 50 lbs. per acre, with 1 14 bushels of oats, will produce the most valuable hog and other stock fodder for fall and winter feeding and for early summer pasture that you can possibly plant. Valuable, I will say, first on account of its earliness, maturing four to six weeks earlier than corn. Second, the immense yield of rich, dry fodder. advise sowing with the peas, the Kherson or Iowa 103 If you are going to plant Oats, as they mature at about the same time. the peas on high poor land, the Swedish Select or taller growing late oat would be better. Plant a field of these oats and peas near your home yards and at the right time turn the hogs in and let them do the If planted alone sow 90 lbs. per harvest. They will pay you for it. Price: 1 lb., 20c; 10 lbs., $1.25; 25 lbs., $2.15; 50 lbs., $4.30; acre. 190 lbs., $7.85. I

of the opinion

We

Cow

Peas

The Great Soil Improver. Makes poor land rich, makes good land more productive, enriching the soil even after the crop is cut. Green crops plowed under are one of the best and cheapest ways of improving the soil. For this purpose the Cow- Pea is excellent, especially for a medium or light soil. They should be sown in May or June, at the rate of \y 2 bushels to the acre, and plowed under as soon as they have attained then- full growth. While this crop is very largely grown wherever known, with the results obtained from it, the wonder is that it is not grown ten times as much as at present. There is no surer or cheaper means of improving soil than by sowing Cow Peas. Cow Peas for Hay If planted early say the middle of May, in the central corn belt section, a crop can be cut and cured for hay the same as clover, then the stubble in a short time will put on a new grou th to be turned under in the fall as a fertilizer. We suggest sowing Kaffir Corn with this crop, at the rate of one peck The Kaffir Corn holds the vines to one'bushel of the Cow Peas per acre.



T

off

the ground, causing a better growth. lbs., $1.50; 50 lbs., $4.25; 100 lbs., $8.00. 1

New Era— 15

Sand ©r Winter Vetch

— (Vici

Villosa)

— Sometimes

called

Hairy

Vetch. Thrives surprisingly on poor, light land, and well withstands extremes of drouth, heat and cold. It may be sown either in the spring or fall, usually with Rye. In the North it remains all winter under the snow, and it is invaluable for early pasturing or soiling. It is valuable For hay, cut when as a fertilizer, being a great nitrogen gatherer. commencing to pod. Fifty pounds seed per acre. Lb., 35c; 10 lbs., $2.50; 100 lbs., $18.00.

John Statsmann, Naper, Nebraska.

my

I have just sold business to Mr. Wright, who wTill take possession at once. I wish to thank the Seed Company for the service and square dealings you have given me in all the years we have done business together. I wish you the best of success for the future.

CANADA FIELD” PEAS

1866

86

— HOUSE

OF GURNEY, YANKTON,

S.

D.

— 1925

Sorghums, Saccharines and Non-Saccharine



PenciSaria Pearl Millet This mammoth millet is unlike any other millet grown, and is often referred to as Cattail Millet on account of the resemblance The millet grows of the head to that of the cattail, grown in the sloughs. to a height of 10 feet; produces a wonderful amount of forage and will produce two crops in one season. It requires about 12 lbs. of seed per acre. Price, Per lb., 35c; 10 lbs., $2.25; 50 lbs., $10.00. Kaffir Corn Grows from 5 to 7 feet high, making a straight upright growth with enormous wide leaves. The stalks keep green and are brittle and juicy, not hardening like other varieties of Sorghum, making excellent fodder, either green or dried, which is highly relished by stock. The seed heads form at the top of each stalk. For the grain sow in rows three feet For fodder, sow 50 lbs., apart, three to five pounds of seed to the acre. Lb., 20c; 25 lbs., $1.75; 50 ibs., $2.75; 100 either broadcast or in drills.



lbs., $4.25.

Dwarf Broom Corn #e

have discontinued offering any of the tall growing varieties of Broom Corn. have sold that continuously for years and without cataloging the Dwarf variety we have sold each season, through correspondence, several times the quantity of Dwarf than we have of the tall. This demonstrates to

We

us that the grower wants the Dwarf which is better from every standpoint. The Dwarf Broom Corn stands up better than the taller varieties, is practically free from crooked brush. The fiber is long and fine and commands always the highest market price. 1 9b., 25c; 10 lbs., $1.50; 50 lbs., $5.00; 100 Ebs., $8.50. variety,

Cane Sorghum West is not

or

(or

Sorghum

Sugar Cane) in the

appreciated, and we wish to call the attention of farmers everywhere to the great value of Sorghum as a pasture and fodder crop, and to the particular advantage to be at

all

gained by growing

Sorghum may

it.

be made to furnish the principal provender for cattle and horses from August KAFFIR CORN until the following spring. As a summer pasture for sheep, a wide field is likely to be opened up by it. As a soiling food for swine it is most excellent, and the seed furnishes a splendid food for fowls. It grows right along through the severest and most prolonged drouths.



Early Amber Cane This popular and well known variety 10 9bs„ SOc; 59 lbs., $2.50; 100 ibs., $4.00.

Dakota Grown Amber Cane —We have

Branching Yellow Milo Maize Grows from 5 to 7 feet high, stooling from the ground, sending out heads of great size, often weighing three-quarters of Cattle, horses and hogs will eat it ter ripe. he severe drouth corn dried up within a few plant an acre. Lb., 20c; 10 lbs., 85c; 100

Feterita This is another valuable stock food. It has been recommended generally for It is probably the best of all the grains for that purchickens and other fowls. All kinds of stock relish it, and on pose, but that is only a portion of its value. account of its immense yield, producing in a reasonable season 100 bushels per acre, it makes it almost necessary that you plant a quantity of this in order to The greatest, advantage in planting secure the greatest profit from your farm. It will produce a Feterita over other grains is its drought-resisting qualities. crop on probably less moisture than any of the farm crops; yielding better, of But to guard against crop failure you should have course, with more moisture. The heads grow and resemble the white Kaffir a field of Feterita each year. Corn, but the grain is one-half larger, the heads plumper and better filled, and Price; 1 lb., 25c; it matures three weeks earlier than any of the Kaffir Corns. 10 Ibs., $1.00; 25 ibs., $1.75; 50 lbs., 100 Ibs., $4.25.

$2.50;

Feterita—This photograph was taken in the city of Yankton at Mr. Jeffers’ home. Mr. Jeffers has a large flock of white Leghorns and he grows Feterita for chicken feed. cut and shocked this at times the shocks

He

and

FETERITA GROWN BY MR. JEFFERS

were literally white with the chickens eating this It provaluable feed. duces more chicken feed per acre than any other grain.

the earliest.

Lb., 25c;

quantities of cane grown for us each season in it than other canes, we do claim earliness lb., 25c; 10 lbs., $1.00; 50 lbs., $2.50;

Dakota, and while w e do not claim better yields for and drouth-resistant features over other canes. 1 100 lbs., $4.75. T

is

i

1866

— HOUSE



;

OF GURNEY, YANKTON,

S.

D.

— 1925

87

Marquis Wheat From these facts is seen, first, that winter varieties are best where they can be grown in the northern section of the Great Plains; second, that Durums are better than any spring common wheat in some sections; third, that the Marquis variety is better than any of the spring common wheats at most stations, and as good as any of the rest. The Marquis is a safe variety to grow anywhere in this section when spring wheat is to be grown. The Marquis wheat is specially well adapted to central South Dakota; here drought and rust often reduce the yields of later maturing varieties.

of the Marquis and color of flour were demonstrated in the test made at Ottawa in the early months of 1907, and all of the surplus seed was at once sent to the Indianhead Experimental Farm for propagation.

The high bread-making strength

The Marquis variety was tested in competition with Red Fife at four of the Canadian Experimental Farms during various periods during the years of 1907 to 1914, inclusive. At three of the stations, the overyields of the Marquis were from 1334 per 6ent to 38 2-10 per cent higher than Red Fife, the highest yielding wheat in the Canadian Province. The Marquis is an early variety. It is three or four days earlier than most of the other Fife varieties. Because of its earliness it escapes the drought of dry years, the rust and fall rains of wet seasons, and also the early fall frosts.' These are the characteristics which have made it specially valuable in Provinces of Canada. Tested at 22 different Experiment Stations. Yields showing from 134 bushels to 7 bushels per acre higher than any other variety of spring wheat.

The Preston or Velvet Chaff, a bearded wheat, is now the leading variety in that district. The Marquis is Beardless, a better yielder, as well as a better milling wheat.

price list :

Marquis

Rust-Resistant

vs.

lbs.,

80c; 30 Sbs., $1.75; 60 lbs.,

$3.00; 300 lbs., 513.75.

Agricultural College D-5

Wheat— 15

D-l

Wheat

North Dakota

I can not answer your question regarding its milling value. I am told that millers do not object to it but I am pretty confident that no miller knows it when he sees it. The milling tests here have not been as extensive as with D-5 and I suspect that this wheat, if milled alone might also be found to have its faults, but since wheats are nearly always milled as mixtures its defects may prove to be its highest merit.

Referring to your letter of August 19th D-5 and D-l were distributed by this office to about the same extent in 1911. D-5 came under criticism because the buyers could recognize it as a new wheat. D-l is Amber color and it took them a longer time to find it or re-discover it and you may be sure that I have not helped anybody discover it for fear that it would go the same road that velvet chaff went.

H.

Personally, I believe that both wheats are the most rust resisting wheats the American Agricultural World has ever

L.

Bolley.

note what you say regarding the head of wheat I sent you. This is D-l rust proof, and yields very big. The D-5 is the Red Durum, which the mills knock, claiming it did not have the milling qualities. There is no such objection to the D-l, as it sells at Amber Durum prices. The wheat yields much more and is immune to rust, which insures a crop every year. It also stands up well and is also drought I

known.

No doubt, D-l is more valuable than D-5 because it will take an expert to tell good D-l from Aranautka or Kubanka. As in the case of D-5, I do not profess that it has any milling I have given it a chance to be tried. I have never values. said that it would yield 100 or 200 or even 10 per cent more than some other varieties. I am glad to learn that it is being

-

Daniel Sachow.

resistant.

re-discovered.

Rust-Resistant am

printing extracts from letters of Mr. Sachow and H. L. Bolley of the North Dakota Agricultural College. There is a heap of truth in Mr. Bolley’s statement and it may be that you will have to accept a little lower price for D-l than the regular market for Marquis or other standard varieties; but when you harvest, in some cases, two or three times better crop from this Rust Resistant Wheat than from other I

Wheat D-l you can well afford to take a lower price. Our Mr. Wensberg spent considerable time in North Dakota determining the values of D-5 and D-l and found that both of them almost invariably yielded from 18 to 35 bushels per acre, while on account of rust, such varieties as Marquis, Kubanka and other varieties were nearly a total failure. Per bushel, $2.85; per 300 lbs., $13.25; per 600 lbs., $25.50. varieties

Kota Wheat This is a variety of hard, red Spring wheat brought from Russia by Prof. Bolley of the North Dakota Agricultural College, in 1903.

The following description and action of Kota Wheat in the Dakotas is taken from United States Department of AgriculDepartment Circular, No. 280 and was edited by Prof. J. Allen Clark, Agronomist in Charge of Western Seed Investigation and Prof. L. R. Waldon, Plant Breeder of the North Dakota Agricultural Experiment Station. In 1917 and 1918, selections were made from this variety to determine their rust resistance. At the State Agricultural Experiment Station in North Dakota, South Dakota and Minnesota, they proved to be resistant to black stem rust. Previous to this time, resistance to stem rust of Wheat w as a quality not known to hard, red Spring wheat, grown in the ture,

r

United States, although long recognized in several varieties of Durum Wheat. in 1918 not only showed the Wheat, but indicated that it would yield and that it had good milling and bread making qualities. The results of these experiments were presented and the name Kota applied to the variety.

The experiments conducted

rust resistance of the well,

Since 1918, a considerable mass of experimental data has been recorded on the resistance of Kota Wheat to stem rust, on its yield, milling and baking value.

The important question is the value of Kota when compared with the Marquis, the leading variety of hard, red Spring Wheat. In 1919 rust First, we will take resistance to stem rust. notes were obtained at eleven stations on Kota and Marquis. Kota was and on Marquis infection on rust 60%. The In 1920 rust notes were obtained at nine stations and the rust In percentage on Kota was 15% and on Marquis 49%. 1921, rust notes were obtained at fourteen stations and Kota showed 2%, while Marquis showed 44%. In 1922 rust notes were obtained at eighteen stations and the average infection

3%

was

8%

for

Kota and 49%

for Marquis.

In North and South Dakota for the period of 1918 to 1922, inclusive, the yield of Kota over Marquis at thirteen stations averaged from 5 to 53% greater; at two stations, it shows approximately 25% less yield. These two stations, however, had only two years instead of five years trial.

Station. Kota is a hard, red Spring Wheat, bearded and is easily distinguishable from Preston Velvet Chaff in appearance in

Summing up the value of Kota wheat. It is more rust resistant than any other variety of Spring Wheat, is equally as rust resistant as the most rust resistant Durum variety, which makes Kota especially valuable in any section of the country, where black stem rust is severe, except in the more humid sections of the Spring Wheat region, Minnesota, Wisconsin and Iowa and states of that character it is not well

both heads and kernels.

adapted.

Kota greatly resembles the hard, red Winter varieties Turkey, Karkof and Kanred. Kota heads and matures slightly later than Marquis, so its greater freedom from rust injury is not due to greater ability to escape this disease by maturing early. When soil moisture has been the limiting factor, Kota usually withstands the extreme conditions better than other hard, red Spring wheats.

The milling and baking values of this new Wheat is pronounced O. K. by such Mills as the Pillsbury Flour Mills Company, St. Paul Milling Co. and Washburn-Crosby Company, which would settle, I believe, absolutely, its milling and bread making qualities.

In the Spring of 1919, Prof. Bolley made a distribution of this seed to a Mr. Herre, and the North Dakota Experimental

PRICES—1 bushel, $40.09, bags free.

$4.50; 5 bushels, $21.00; 10 bushels,

— ——— —— —— YANKTON, S. D. — 1925

——— —— ————— 1866— HOUSE OF GURNEY,

88

100.000 Feet of Glass for Growing Plants and Flowers Owing

Company

to unsatisfactory service by haying Greenhouse goods come from a separate company, the handle all of the orders direct this year, insuring absolutely satisfactory service.

Gurney Seed & Nursery-

We

will

will appreciate

your

orders.

Postage prepaid, in

all "cases

We

except where noted.

prepay the postage or express on the plants named

in this

greenhouse

section. if

We guarantee all plants ordered from this section to reach the purchaser in good condition in any part of the United States; they reach you otherwise, notify us promptly.

— We

— —

Whitmanii A cross of the Boston Fern and Each, 25c to $2.00. Roosevelt An improved variety of Boston Fern.

ship all plants: as soon as order is Time of Shipment received, weather permitting; or, if your order calls for plants that should not be sent until some further date, we hold them until the proper time for planting out-

Antirrhinum, or Giant Snapdragon and

Asparagus Ferns

Each, 15c; doz., $1.20.

red.

summer. Each, 15c; doz., $1.20. Abutilon, or Flowering Maple

a

mass

of flowers

dows



Is easily grown even in the north winEach, 20c; 4 for 60c; large plants, 25c

of a residence.

and

in

various colors, large bell-shaped flowers in Each, 25c; 10, assorted, $1.70. Centaurea, or Dusty Miller A dwarf, silvery foliage Each, 12c; plant, used largely for ribbon beds or borders. doz., $1.00. Coleus These inexpensive plants make the greatest summer decoration, beds, borders, etc., of anything you can plant. Each, 15c; doz., $1.25. Our Special Velvet Coleus Bed, 50 plants, $4.50; 100 plants, $7.50. Carnations These are the carnations that you get commercially from, the greenhouse, the large fragrant flowers with their spiey odor. White Enchantress Each, 20c; 10 for 51.50. Pink Enchantress Each, 20c; 10 for $1.50. Each, 20c; 10 for $1.50. Pink. Mrs. P. W. Victory Finest .scarlet! Each, 20c; 10 for $1.50. Fuchsias Colors, pure white to crimson. Each, 20c. Feverfew The best bloomers,' especially good for cemetery. Each, 25c; doz., $1.75. red.

Plumosus Nanus

all

leaves —Maple-like orange, pink and

50c.



Sprengeri A splendid plant for hanging basket. 20c; 5 for 60c: large size, 25c and 50c.





in

Chrysanthemums —Best

from one inch

autumn flowers; the pompon varieties to of all

in diameter in eight inches across in the large-flowering. Golden Mammoth yellow. Charles Razor- Early, pure white, in-curve.

flowers flowers

at

all

an immense num-

times.

All





Ferns-- We are growing only the best varieties of these, such as will do well in ferneries or in the ordinary bay window

Boston fronds as to $2,00.

Fern,

much

the

Improved Sword Fern

as six feet long in a single season.

3-inch pots,

Pelargonium Lady Washington Geraniums, each,

20c.

Ivy-Leaved Geraniums Each, 20e.

Various colors, sweet scented,

Geranium Bed From 2V2 -5nch

12 each of the best scarlet, white pots, $3.50, postpaid; 4-inch

etc.

Special

and

pink.

pots, $7.00, express collect.

Jerusalem~Cherry

Grown

for its

showy

berry.

Each,

Rapid growing climbers.

—Produces Each, 20c

English— Old

favorite vine,

Each, 15c; doz.,

showy the year around.

Each, 25c. Marguerite Daisy Large white flowers with yellow center. Each, 20c: doz., $1-75. Oleander Old-fashioned shrubs. Pink and white. Each,





50c.

Double Petunias -Extremely popular; both indoor and bedding purposes. Each, 20e, Stevia Sprays of small white flowers of delightful fragrance

colors.

Dracene Indivisa A decorative plant, growing two feet high. Used for porch boxes, hanging baskets and centers of beds. Each, 45c. Double Daisy Very double, pure white and pink flowers; blooms freely from spring until fall. Each, 12c; doz., 90c. or fern dishes for table decoration.

From

Each, 15c; doz., $1.75; 100, $11.00. 29c each; 10 for $1.80; ICO for $17.00.

Ivies,







$1.25.

ber of flowers, one to two inches across. King of Plumes -Yellow, plume-like flower. Pink Mensa Exactly like Shasta Daisy. 20c each; 10 Price of large-blooming Chrysanthemums: for $1.50, Pompon Chrysanthemums: 20c each; doz., $1-50.

Lantana A mass of flowers Each, 20c; doz., $1.50,

— —

Moonflower



— — —

Yellow Touset Bronze-yellow, early. October Frost The earliest of the whites. Major Bonaffon A perfect ball of yellow.

Mum

bedding plants. be budded and

20c.

Glow—

Pompon Chrysanthemums — Produce

all

will

bloom. S. A. Nutt Color, dark crimson. La Favorite The best white geranium. Mrs. Frances Perkins Bright pink. Rose Sweet-scented leaves.



Ward—

— —

Each,

Geraniums most satisfactory of Getting them from us, most of the plants are undoubtedly the



— —

Each.

20c to $2.00.

— White, yellow, pink

Ageratum-—Color, deep blue forming

others.

Each, 15c.

Cobaea Scandens

—ClimberEach,rapid growth, bearing large of

15c; doz., $1.25. covered every day in the season with white and pink flowers. Each, 15c; doz., $1.25. Vinca, Major One of the best Ones; va-

quantities of purple flowers.

Vinca Rosea

Perfect bush,

riegated white. Each, 20c; 10 for $1.50.



Wandering Jew The old-fashioned trail-

plant, used for hanging baskets, etc.. Each, 10c; doz., $1.00.

ing

Flower and Vegetable Plants grown from carefully transplanted stock and must not be confused with the regular bed plants, which will endure less shipping and will not produce as strong, healthy plants as the transplanted stock. Packing charges are included in the prices given, but purchaser must pay transportation on lots of over 12. Plants of all kinds should invariably be sent by express or Parcel Post. Cabbage, Early Ready by April 1st Per 1,000, $7.00; 100, $1.25; doz., 25e. Cabbage, Late Ready by June 1st Per 1,000, $5.50; 100, 90c; doz., 20c. Cauliflower Ready by April 1st. Per 100, $1.50; doz., 25c. Celery Ready in June. Per 1,000, $6.00; 100, 90c; doz., 20c. Egg-Plant Ready May 10. Per 100, $2.50; doz, 35c. Parsley Ready by April 1st. Curled. Per 100, $3.00; doz., 40c. Pepper Ready by May 1st. Ruby King. Per 1,000, $10.00; 100, $2.00; doz., 35c. Sweet Potato Ready by May 20th. Per 1,000, $7.00; 100, $1.00; doz., 20c. Tomato Ready by May 1st. Per 1,000. $10.00; 100, $2.20: doz., 25c. Topp Tomato Per 12, 75c; each, 10c. Tobacco Plants 12 for 75c; 25 for $1.25. All of our Plants are

— —

Per doz.

Per 50

Per 100

$1.50

$2.50 1.75 2.25 1.75 1.50 6.90 4.50 4=99

$4.00 3.00 4.00 3.50 3.00 11.00 7.59 7=09

Ageratum. Alyssum.

.85 .85 .85 .60

Dusty Miller Asters, Named Asters, Mixed.

Cannas, Growing Plants Goleus Feverfew

.

2.50 1.50 1=75

Per doz. Geraniums.

.

Lobelia. Pansies, Giant

Mixed Petunia, Double Fringe

1.00

Petunia, Single Fringe

60

Stevia

Verbena

1.25 .......

.75

Per 50

Per 100

$5.00 2.50 2.50 4.00 2.00 4,50 3.50 2.59

$11.00 4=50 4.25 7.00 3.75 7,00 6.00 4=50

1866— HOUSE OF GURNEY,

YANKTON,

D.— 1925

S.

89

Nursery Department We

can ship nursery stock into any State. In shipping into Canada the purchaser must secure a permit from the

Canadian Government.

This permit should accompany the

order mailed to us before shipping time.

FREE FROM DANGEROUS INSECTS AND DISEASE Our nurseries are inspected by the state inspector each year and the certificate showing freedom from insects and diseases is

printed below:



STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA

YOU

Certificate of Nursery Inspection Office of State Entomologist, Brookings, S. D.

TO BUY ANYTHING TO GET THE BENEFIT OF

OUR_ 59 YEARS EXPERIENCE IN THE NORTHWEST.

Brookings, S. Dak., Sept. 8, 1924.

THIS

IS

Shipping

TO CERTIFY that the nursery stock growing

at purchaser’s risk only.

burlapped, papered and encased in straw, or boxed. Water-proof paper is used in wrapping all parcels post shipments. cannot book orders excepting Terms: 3 Cash with order. where remittance or partial remittance is received with order. Quantifies Ordered One to 9 at single rates; 10 to 99 at L0 rates; 100 to 499 at 100 rates; 500 and up at 1,000 rates, unless priced otherwise. Instructions With each order will be sent a pamphlet giving full directions for the proper care and handling of sent out. i very thing

We





late ones, and LOth, allow you to

cannot ship trees of over 4 postage

is

not included

we

ft.

in length

will

by

parcels post.

Where

send the goods and you pay the

postage on receipt of trees.

GUARANTEE—We wiiS

guarantee everything sent out

to be true to name and in good growing condition. It otherwise, you must notify us at once, money will be refunded or other stock sent free of charge. All stock that fails to grow will, on application, after July 15tn and before August 15th, be refurnished at one-half price the following spring or fall, PROVIDING

WE MAKE NO

(INSTRUCTIONS ARE FOLLOWED.

OTHER GUARANTEE.

Early Nursery Orders Only

Early orders for nursery stock are more valuable to us

ban



Nursery Stock by Express We earnestly advise that you have your nursery stock shipped by express, so that your goods are not so long on the road. Parcels Post We have fine success sending nursery stock by parcels post. We can make shipments of up to 70 lbs. in the 1st and 2nd zones, and up to 50 lbs. in all other zones. We



manner with the best packing rolled or made into a neat bale,

best

off for

— —

Shipping Season We can ship, as a rule, from the middle March throughout April and May. Prepaid Stations Some stations are called “Prepaid,” as the company has no agent there; in such cases all transportation charges have to be paid at this end. The goods are taken from the trains at these prepaid stations and left there of

ship nursery stock which has been officially inspected and found apparently free from injurious insects, Arachnids, worms and dangerous plant diseases. This certificate is valid until July 1st, 1925, unless revoked. Resident Nursery Certificate No. 201. Number of acres inspected, 240. H. C. SEVERIN, State Entomologist.

Five Per Cent

have the Great Northern, North-Western We will ship by mail, express or no directions are given we will

use cur best judgment.

tors of this office, in accordance with the provisions of Chapter 260, Session Laws of 1917, State of South Dakota, and permission is hereby granted said nursery to sell and

y

—We

and Milwaukee railroads. freight, as directed, but where

Gurney Seed and Nursery Company of (Incorp.) proprietors at Yankton, South Dakota, has been inspected by G. Gilbertson and H. Severin, duly appointed inspecin the

Packing is done in the material and every order

“Experience” is said to “teach a dear school.” We have had a long experience in this school and what we learned at the greatest cost may be yours for the asking. Write what your conditions are soil, exposure, surroundings; write and tell us what you want and you will receive a prompt answer with all attainable information. DO NOT HAVE

we will, on all orders received before March add in stock 5 per cent of the amount of

your order.

when

goods,

Thus, for $20.00 you can buy $21.00 worth of remittance is received with the order.

full

Ten Tree Commandments broken roots with a sharp knife, cutting slantvise from the under side. 2. Dig a hole larger than the space the roots will take up. Place the top soil on one side of the hole and the sub3. surface soil on the other. 1.

Trim

all

4.

Slightly loosen the soil at the

5.

Bed

the tree on the good

soil,

bottom pressing

of the hole. it

well around

up with

packing and watering

6.

Fill

7.

Set the tree about two inches deeper than

subsoil,

it well. it

was.

Never let the exposed roots dry for one minute. 9. Prune the top until the branch system is slightly smaller than the roots. 10. Cultivate the soil around the tree every week, commencing middle of May; last cultivation about August 20th. 8.

,he roots.

JAMES

I. CHEELY, Marlow County, III,, Dec. $9, 1923. Three years ago I bought one of your small size Longfield Apple trees. This year it made seven nice apples. My neighbors wondered how so small a tree codtd grow such large apples. I told them that this proved the value of apple trees on Baccata roots, as you do not have to wait a life-time for the fruit. With your Pyrus Baccata roots, you have surely dropped a bomb-shell among the other Nurseries, for early bearing.

Brother George Says

“INFORMATION

IS

HIS

MIDDLE NAME”

asked for before the heavy rush of orders and packing commences. In other words, if you will go over the catalog on its if

arrival, get

an idea

any information

of

what you are going

in reference to

it,

to

want and write

he can, with

for

his corps of

keep up with the correspondence and give you the But, if you wait until desire and we wish to give. the rush is on, letters are bound to be a little shorter and possibly not replied to as promptly, on account of thousands of

assistants,

service

you

In the rush season everybody in each day. using their best effort to get the orders out to the customers.

them coming

He

also informs

Professor

me

that nearly

all of

is

the states have put

Hansen productions on the recommended

fruit lists,

and he wants to call your attention again to the fact that we use Pyrus Baccata roots entirely for the propagation of all apples and crab apples, that we are the first and only ones to do this,

TONY WITH A 4000 POUND LOAD OF NURSERY STOCK BY PARCEL POST

those that it insures a hardier, much earlier bearing tree than propagated in other ways or on other roots.

1866

90

— HOUSE

OF GURNEY, YANKTON,

S.

D.— 1925

Asparagus This much neglected, earliest healthful, easily grown vegetable should You can grow find a place in every garden; whether on the farm or in town. such an immense quantity on so small a space that you certainly cannot Asparagus roots should be planted in a well-prepared afford to neglect it. bed, the roots covered, about five or six inches and the soil made very rich with fertilizer each season in order to produce the maximum amount of very If planted in rows the plants should be. about one foot apart large shoots. If in a bed in the in the row, and the rows far enough apart for cultiyation. garden, plant them about pne fbotapart each way and cultivate with the hoe. Washington Asparagus—This ‘.is; the. first time have offered this wonderful asparagus. ;This is. a high quality 7 asparagus producing larger stocks than any other asparagus, is free from rust and cannot be recommended too highly. If you are intending to plant a small garden or grow asparagus for the market, you cannot make a mistake in planting this variety. All of the large planters are getting into this variety as rapidly as possible. It brings a higher price on the market. 25 plants, .

we

'

parcel post paid, 75c; 25 plants, you pay transportation, 50c; 59 plants, 80c; 100 plants, $1.50; per thousand, $8.00. These are heavy one plants. They may be planted either in the fall the spring. Conover’s Colossal and Palmetto Asparagus —These are the standard early varieties of asparagus that we have been offering in the past. 25 plants, parcel post paid, 65c; 25 plants, you pay transportation, 50c; 50 plants, 90c; 100 plants, $1.40; per thousand, $7.00.

New Bohemian

Horseradish

This horseradish is perfectly hardy anywhere. Is a very desirable article as a relish. Its roots are dug in early spring, grated fine, vinegar added, and it is ready for use. For planting and care, first plant the roots about two inches deep in a desirable location w here they can be left permanently. Give them good cultivation.

roots were introduced by the U. S. Dept, of Agriculture. They are much and produce better than the ordinary sort. Roots grow larger, are whiter, and quality is far All w ho grow horseradish should use this variety; we have discarded the old standard kind, as Mainer will outyielcTand is much more satisfactory in every way. 5 for 60c; per 19, $1.09; 25, $2.25; cuttings, $1.00 per 50.

The Mainer Horseradish

earlier,

superior.

7

Rhubarb

or Pie Plant

This is where- the 'fellow -with a little piece of ground in town, as well -as the man with the big farm,, can take a solar plexus punch at the high cost of living, and live better and feel better than you can without this saving. You can grow pie plant so easily and in such a small space, and produce such an immense crop that makes the most excellent sauce and pies, that you are certainly neglecting one of the big little If you could grow the ordinary farm crops as easily as you can grow things if you fail to have a supply. rhubarb, you would simply- plant the crop and take a vacation, because it will grow and produce anywhere and' uriider almost any conI do not want you to think, how:ever,. that it is Jthe proper dition. way to grow rhubarb. It responds to better care and better conditions just as any other crop will. -

7

.

Plant plenty for canning. You have heard the, following, “An apple a day keeps the doctor away.” There is ,more„ truth to this than many realize. The same may be said of the Rhubarb.



Linnaeus Large, early, tender and fine ve consider this the Large, whole roofs, each, 10c; 10, 85c; 100, $5.00. 2 yrs„, 15c each; 10 for $1.25; 100 for $10.00

best's of all.

Gurney’s Seedless Rhubarb As the snow disappears- and the frost leaves the ground, the big, strong shoots of the rhubarb break through as the heralds of spring. With the ordinary rhubarb, you get an immediate crop followed by immense seed stalks, producing large quantities of seed, and the eatable part immediately becomes pithy, stringy and of poor flavor. With this new7 introduction, a plant practically seedless, rows eighty rods long in the nursery seldom producing as much as a single pound of seed, producing immense leaf stems measuring as much as 2 Yi inches through and often three feet long, of delicious quality, wine-colored, and continuing in this condition through the summer if you will only use freely from the plants, makes this new introduction, the seedless rhubarb, of more value to the home gardener than anything in that line yet introduced. You understand, rhubarb can be propagated in tw o w7ays only; one by division of the old roots, w hich gives you inferior plants, and the other from seed. As this rhubarb is so nearly seedless the plants will always be higher priced than others, but will be well worth the difference. Our supply of this variety is naturally limited, but we offer while it lasts, strong plants each 40c; 3 for $1.00; 10 for $3.00. 7

7

Royal Purple Raspberry In making up the catalog, or the raspberry section, I left out through error this Royal Purple variety. It is a variety of rather late origin, extremely hardy, and a better shipping berry than the red varieties. The fruit is exceptionally large, borne in remarkable quantities, and it has proven as hardy with us as the Ohta. It has been more profitable in this section in fruit production than any variety, including the Ohta. Our supply of the Royal Purple is limited to about three thousand plants for this year’s delivery. The price is very reasonable. We think you should plant some of them this year. I know you will be well pleased with the results. Per 5, 60c; $1=00 per 10; $4=00 per 50; $7=00 per 100; $25=00 per 500.

1866— HOUSE OF GURNEY, YANKTON,

S.

D.— 1925

91

Iron Clad This word is often used to indicate the hardiness of a tree or shrub. If it means anything, the Pyrus Baccata root

is

iron-clad.

If it

means more, possibly the Pyrus Baccata root because it

solid iron,

is is

the hardiest known apple root. The only root used by the House of Gurney for propagating apples for

commercial large orThis insures

chards.

long

life,

early bearing,

which means a pleasure and profit for you.

FROM rowing at Ottawa, Canada.

The spread of

this tree is

old and as sound today as

it

was

SIBERIA.

more than

sixty feet. fifty years ago.

It

is

very

Some Real Information on Hardy Apples Possibly you do not know about the Pyrus Baccata. This one of the original apples growing wild in northern Russia ad Siberia. In size the fruit is from one-fourth of an inch to ae-half an inch through, generally borne in clusters of three r four, bright red in color and mostly all seed. The Pyrus accata is absolutely the hardiest apple tree that can be rown, will stand the winters in any part of the world where ees of any kind exist. This makes it especially desirable as stock on which to graft or bud other varieties that are hardy lough above the ground, but are often killed back and damped under ground.

For the information of those who are not familiar with the recess of reproducing fruit, we offer the following: Apples, •abs, plums, cherries, currants, gooseberries, etc., will not iproduce true to name from seed, and for that reason must ther be grown from cuttings, as is the case with the small uits, or by budding and grafting, as for tree fruits. r

The process of budding and grafting is as follows: A limb bud of the new growth of the tree which you wish to grow, inserted or spliced on some hardy root. On account of the

yrus Baccata root being hardier than any other apple root This

e use this as a root stock for our apples and crabs. tsures our getting the hardiest tree obtainable anywhere.

Y ou are all familiar in your own locality with'the orchard situaon. You see a fine tree producing big crops of fruit flourish, roduce and die, and you come to the conclusion that it is not or th while. The reason for failure nine times out of ten is )ot killing caused by what nurserymen call a “test winter.” he test winter is generally one where there was lack of rainill in the fall and the ground freezes up dry. This followed y an extremely cold winter without snow covering, makes a ;st winter and root kills and damages the trees. The next sar these trees leaf out in a sickly fashion, they sometimes irvive the next and maybe several summers, but are unhealthy ad a breeding place for insects and eventually die. Apples

—The

:

*

The Growing We

made

its

usual growth and big crop of the

Another advantage of the Pyrus Baccata: It has a tendency to dwarf the rapid growing, late-bearing varieties, bringing them into bearing often in the nursery row. Little trees six to eight feet high have produced fairly good crops of full-sized beautiful colored apples. It is a pleasure to watch your Pyrus Baccata orchard grow and know that it will live after you are gone.

The seed secure.

of the Pyrus Baccata has been very difficult to There have been only a few trees in the United States

and these scattered over a wide territory. A number of years ago we planted an orchard of these trees that we could gather our own seed and they are coming into bearing, and for the last several years we have been able to secure more or less of the seed. Now we can announce to you that all apple trees grown by us and sold to you in the future will be on the Pyrus Baccata root. The variety will be hardy enough so that you of the North, at any rate, will never need to buy another. As a measure of safety we advise the use of the Pyrus Baccata root everywhere. Our sales on apple trees the last two years have doubled due to the fact that we are offering them on this This has enabled us to sell apples on the iron clad root. Baccata root at lower price than others. See price list. See our list of named apples on Baccata roots, pages 95 to 98.



Pyrus Baccata Seedlings For grafting, budding or to grow Per 10, $1.00; 50 for $4.00; 100 for $7.00;

for top working.

1,000 for $50.00.

grow as well nor live as long as the smaller tree. The objection of the few to the smaller tree is that it takes it longer to into bearing. By the use of the Pyrus Baccata as a root on which to work these varieties, we have overcome the late bearing and all varieties produce while very young. We want to furnish you that which will do best for you, produce the quickest, the most satisfactory, and live the longest, and we are going to advise that you purchase the 3 to 4 foot, 4 to 5 foot or 5 to 7 foot; no larger.

come

of Fruit Trees

plant in our nursery and grounds hundreds of acres these each year and the stand is invariably almost perfect, - in other words, what we plant grow and continue to grow, fe wish each one of you purchasing and planting nursery ,ock would read carefully the book of instructions which we nd you previous to shipping your goods; these instructions re very ’simple and it is just as easy and in a great many ises less work to handle nursery stock right than in the

A. A. Swenning, Forester, Ross County, Ohio.

perfect condition, best fruit.

Right Size to Plant

have visited most of the commercial apple growing sections the United States, and have always found that the comlercial grower of apples refuses to plant an apple tree over one two years old and about six feet or less in height. An pple tree at this age and size has a very large lot of fine eding roots, and the top has not developed enough so that au will have to mutilate it by trimming for planting. It will scover from its pruning the first season at that age, while the rger, heavier trees require two years or more, and will never I

:

This is alt overcome by the use of the Pyrus Baccata as a root stock as these conditions do not affect it. The Pyrus Baccata has gone through the worst winters uninjured, and the top of whatever variety if hardy enough for the section in which it is growing, has come through the winter in

and Flowers

altogether too common method that results disastrously to the planter; it is better not to purchase nursery stock at all than it is to purchase it and then fail to give it reasonable care. Without this care it will be an eyesore and a loss instead 9 f a thing of beauty that is both satisfactory and profitable; just read the instructions and follow them and you can be as expert in one season as we are.

IVJay 13, 1924.

Received the complete shipment of 24,000 Cottonwood seedlings and take pleasure in informing you that this order has been filled to Our entire satisfaction.

1866

92

HOUSE OF GURNEY, YANKTON,

1925

S. D.,

Apples, Plums, Cherries, Peaches and Pears Colored Photographs on Pages 93 and 94 orchard. Add to them the apples and crabs offered on Page 93, also shown in colors, and you have an orchard that produces fruit that will supply the

These

fruits

make

the ideal

home

family in fresh and canned goods the year around. These apples and other fruit described on Pages 93 and 94 are the best possible selection.

Zumbra Cherry—Originated

in Minnesota, is a cross of the Pin and the large Sweet Cherry of the west coast and of the wild Sand Cherry of the Dakotas. It seems to be a happy

combination as Zumbra is as hardy as the Sand Cherry, grows rapidly like the Pin Cherry and the fruit is as large and good quality as the California Sweet Cherry. Comes into bearing like the Professor Hansen crosses of plums the next year after planting, very prolific, maturing large annual crops. Zumbra is placed on the Minnesota recommended fruit list as “leading variety” in all districts except No. 6 and in that district for trial. The South line of No. 6 is the South line of St. Louis, Itasca and Beltrami Counties, Minnesota. Zumbra ripens after all sour cherries are gone. Follows closely after Waneta plu^. Price: 2 to 3 ft., 65c each; 5 for $3.00; 10 for $5.75; 25 for $13.00. Price: 3 to 5 ft., 85c; 5 for $4.00; 10 for $7.50.

Hansen Hybrid Pears We

have grown these pears for the last eight years and have trees growing in our orchard and producing fruit. These trees are fifteen to twenty feet high. None of the winters during that period have injured the wood in any way, and the growth has started from a terminal bud each season. The trees in the orchard are interspersed with common varieties of pears subject to and blighting badly each year. Notwithstanding the exposure to these blighting varieties, the Hansen Hybrid Pears have remained immune and absolutely free from blight during the entire time. These very rapid growers produce large quantities of medium sized good quality pears. Pears of the ordinary variety have always been hardy enough to stand the severe winter of this section, but all other varieties of pears are more or less subject to fire blight, and on that account we have been unable to grow them successfully

and profitably. The Hansen Pears are absolutely hardy and blight proof, which makes it just as easy to produce pears as apples or crab

—A Hansen Hybrid.

First of all plums to ripen. At blooming time it is a gigantic bouquet of white flowers of exquisite fragrance. Blooming later than American plums, it escapes frost, which insures annual heavy crops. The name Opata is Sioux Indian f or “ bouquet, ’ and describes ’

these gigantic bushy trees with their annual crop of fragrant white blossoms. Again, when the fruit is ripe it has the appearance of a gigantic bunch of California grapes, on account of the closely packed, highly colored fruits. Ripens about July 15th, keeps on trees in good condition for about two weeks is not a good shipper.' Excellent for home use. ;

Sapa

—Sioux Indian for BLACK.

Bears the first year after planting and continues annually. Fruit medium size, jet black, skin covered with a purplish bloom; flesh bright red, pit very small. Excellent for canning as the skin entirely disappears when cooked. Equally good for preserves and jelly and eating fresh from the tree. Turning the branches of this tree back and exposing the long rope of glossy black fruit to the rays of the sun, the background of the brown, smooth bark and glossy, dark green foliage, is certainly a pleasant sight and one to be remembered.



Waneta The name of a Sioux Indian chief who remained loyal always to the white man. This is another of Prof. Hansen’s productions and the best of Immense in size and often measures two inches all plums. through. Bears heavy annual crop of excellent market plums. have shipped these across the United States and back and have reached destination after that trip of more than 7,000 miles in perfect condition. The Waneta is the most profitable plum grown in the United States today and we are putting out an orchard of many acres Quality is excellent and of this variety for market purposes. suitable for all purposes for which plums are used.

We

apples.

Price:

5 to 7

ft.,

3 to 5 ft., 60c each; 10 for $5.50; 100 for $45.00. 80c each; 5 for $3.50; 10 for $6.50.

Gurney Dakota Peach The

hardiest Peach in existence. Is probably a seedling of the Elberta, crossed with an unknown variety. Has borne regular crops for the last seven years, hardy in both wood and fruit bud, as large as Elberta, quality and color much better. Advise those living north of Yankton to plant this peach on the south side of and close up to house or fence for protection. Yankton and south, it can be planted in the open, without protection. 5 to 7 foot trees, 80c each; 5 for $3.50; 10 for $6.50.

Plums

Professor Hansen’s Opata



Wastesa A number of years ago Prof. Hansen judged the Iowa State Fair. As he was leaving the building, a plate of the first premium plums were handed to him by the grower that he might eat the fruit on the way. He saved the pits and produced from them this most excellent pure-blooded American plum, an annual bearer of large fruit of good quality. Probably the largest and best bearer of any pure-blooded American variety. fruit at the

Size 3-4 ft 4-5 ft 5-7 ft

.

Price List of Above Plums Per 5 Per 10 Per 50 $2.25 $4.20 $18.50 2.90 5.50 25.00 7.50 34,00 3.90

Each

Per 10C

$0.50 .65 .85

$36,01 49.0C 66.0t

Apples and Crabs Offered on Page 93 All on Pyrus Baccata Roots Six of the Hardiest Varietes Hibernal

—Just a

little

old apple tree with its limbs spread-

all directions, the snow and wind drifting through them tonight, but just remember this tree as it has been in the many past Septembers, loaded with delicious fruit, its heavy leathery foliage making a beautiful background for the l«ad, the birds that have nested in it. “Nuff said.”

ing in



Malinda The winter apple of the northwest, the best until the great plant wizard Professor Hansen delivers the one that is equal to the Wealthy in hardiness, quality and quantity and will keep until the new crop comes, he is able to, is working on it, will accomplish it we hope soon, until then Malinda for the table during the long winter evenings.



Wealthy I hope and believe that Peter M. Gideon, tho long since dead, knows tonight just what he gave to the world in the Wealthy apple, he deserves to know, he left a heritage in this apple that no other man has equalled, untiring during his life, working in his modest unassuming way that the pioneer of the northwest might have fruit, he succeeded in his best hope.



Yellow Transparent The early boy, the one that gets up in the morning and hustles its fruit to the marketing stage faster than any other, forgetting nothing in the hustle, quality, quantity, size and the delicate coloring, that mellow yellow that makes you want it more and more, then you get it and it is all you anticipated. -Whitney. Crab— Tho nearly large-enough to be- am apple, stands up like a sentinel at his post, doing its duty each year as it delivers to you its bushels of ripe delicious fruit, a bushel basket full, running over, enough for all, and for all purposes. Picked early for jelly, preserved as they ripen, pockets full of the reddest ones taken to the field or office to be eaten thru the day.



Florence Crab Bears j‘ust a little more fruit per tree than you think it can carry, ripening to the pleasant striped red and yellow color, of the right size and quality for jellies, preserves and canning, the crab apple for the family orchard, Mr. Ed. Bruce here in Yankton planted one in the back yard it 1914 and picked seven and one-half bushels, crop 1922, nc not the first crop by any means.

An Apple

Tree for Shade

It’s reasonable to suppose that an apple tree might be of value It has been foi other purposes as well as for producing fruit. demonstrated thousands of times on the city lot, in the back

yard where there is room for but few trees, that an apple tree makes the most desirable tree for that location, producing fragrant pink flowers in the spring, making it a desirable ornamental tree; this followed by the abundant crop of fruit and heavy foliage makes it very desirable as a shade tree. Put the children under it when the fruit is ripe; they will stay “put.”

Family Orchard Do you so that

it

want the

little

family orchard

all

on Baccata

roots,

may be hardy and last for your lifetime, the little may be planted in the back yard of the town lot.

orchard that

may be added on to the farm for the proper size? If yov do, I am going to send you one each of the six varieties, 5 tc 7 feet high for $3.99; 4 to 5 feet high for $3.60; 3 to 4 feet higl for $1.95. that

REGULAR PRICE 5-6 ft 4-5 ft 3-4 ft

Each

Per 10

Per 50

Per 10C

70c 55c 49c

$6.00 5.00 3.50

$29.00 24.09 14.00

$55.0( 45.0C 26.9(

THE HOME APPLE GARDEN COLLECTION GROWS FRUIT ALWAYS. HARDY APPLES ON HARDY BACCATA ROOTS One each Six 5-6 4-5 3-4

Each 5-6 4-5 3-4

ft.

ft. ft.

70c 55c 40c

ft. ft. ft.

: ;

varieties

$3.90 3.00 1.95

Per 100 $6.00 $29.00 $55.00 45.00 24.00 5.00 14.00 3.50 Per 10

Per 50

1 Malinda

2 Wealthy 3 Yellow Transparent 4 Hibernal 5 Whitney Crab 6 Florence Crab

ZUMBRA CHERRY The New Minnesota Production Each, 65c.; 5 for $3.00; 10 for $5.75; 25 for $13.00

WASTESA

OPATA

Prof essor Hansen’s Hardy as an Oak, Blight-proof.Early Bearing. Good Quality Pear. Grows and bears fruit wherever an apple ‘



will.”

Each, 60c.; 10 for $5.50; 100 for $45.00

WAN ETA HANSEN'S HARDY PLUMS Defy the Elements 10 5 50 100 5-7 ft. 85c $3.90 $7.50 $34.00 $66.00 5.50 25.00 49.00 4-5 ft. 65c 2.90 3-4 ft. 50c 2.25 4.20 18,50 36.00 Size

Each

The Hardiest Peach in Existence

WAN ETA— this

year same price as above.

GURNEY'S DAKOTA PEACH

5,

Each, 80c.; $3.50; 10, $6.50

1866

— HOUSE

OF GURNEY, YANKTON,

D.

S.

— 1925

Hardy Heavy Bearing Apples and Crab Apples on Hardy

95

Siberian

Pyrus Baccata Roots Word to Other Nurseries. To all the nurseries who are growing apple trees and shipping them into the North: cannot do your customers a 'greater service than by furnishing them We will have a surplus of these their apple trees on the hardy Baccata root. in a number of varieties that we can furnish to you at the hundred rate in our catalog. They are the only kind of apple trees that should be sold in Western Kansas, Nebraska and points north where weather conditions are Just a

their

own

You

severe.

Varieties marked “First Hardiness” are good as far north as “Second Hardiness” for all points south of Huron, S. plant. Hardiness” for all points from Yankton south.

Six Reasons

you wish D.

to

“Third

Why You Should Plant BACCATA Roots

on

The Baccata roots are the hardiest of any root that. can be secured grafting "or budding apples. They increase the hardiness of the tops of the trees. They will produce healthier trees. They ripen up the wood earlier than other roots. They produce fruit earlier than apples worked on ordinary roots. They are semi-dwarf. They produce longer lived trees than those worked on ordinary roots.

Anoka Apple— Introduced 1918 by Prof. Hansen at Brookings, S. Dakota No. 2. Now given the name Anoka, a Sioux Indian word meaning “on both sides.” It is a seedling of Mercer (fluke) wild crab top-grafted on Duchess. This tree has borne heavily in 1918 and 1919. The fruit is two and one-half inches in diameter, round, Duchess type of coloring. Flesh white. Season September. I am pleased with the early and heavy bearing of this variety under propagation. I believe this apple is destined to wide popularity as it bears even on young nursery trees. In the spring of 1920 four trees of Anoka apple, one year buds on seedlings of Siberian Crab, were sent to the Experiment Station at Fargo, North Dakota. Under date of December 2, 1922, Professor A. F. Yeager, Agricultural College, Fargo, North Dakota, reports on these trees as follows: “This spring two of the four trees blossomed, one produced 23 apples, the other 26. Practically all the fruit was set from lateral buds. Upon exambefore fruiting as South

WELL ROOTED TREES inetion this fall it seems that all four of the Anoka apple trees have a lot of lateral fruit buds showing. The trees are not yet as high as one’s head and were They began scarcely four feet high last spring. ripening about the 15th of August. The apples are medium to above medium in size, but somewhat larger than Duchess.. They are oblong in character.

Our specimens showed very little color. The flavor seemed to be very similar to Duchess.” This tree has proven an early bearer wherever tried out. First degree of hardiness. 1 yr., each, 69c; per 5, $2.70; per 19, $5.25. 2 yr., 4 to 6 ft., each, $1.00; per 5, $5.00. Anisim Season, early winter. Prof. Hansen reports this Russian apple proving very valuable in the northwest; the tree is -a strong grower and a prodigious bearer. The beautiful color of the fruit Fruit medium in attracts favorable attention. size; surface, greenish yellow, covered almost wholly with a beautiful crimson. First hardiness.



Ben Davis

A LOADED

WEALTHY



NL Carmel Sweet Apple originated by Professor N. E. Hansen, Brookings, South Dakota, extremely hardy, skin yelA sweet apple of excellent quality. Season early. 3 to 4 ft., each, 70c; per 5, $3.00. We can furnish the new varieties in sizes listed only.

Iowa twenty years ago. nearly an annual bearer.

low.





Delicious This apple is the one that has been advertised more than any other the past few years. The fruit is large, quality excellent, very fragrant, will keep until March or April; skin dark red, shaded to yellow. The Delicious originated in

The Ben Davis

The

original tree

still

stands and

is

Second hardiness.



hardiness.

!

Farm.



Originated by the Minnesota Fruit Breeding Winter apple red of good quality. First degree of and a good keeper. 3 to 4 ft., each, 70c; per 5,

Haroldson

;

in order to secure the crop. This variety can be used when it is about half grown, and makes equally as good sauce or pie at that time as when thoroughly ripe, making the season probably the longest of any of the varieties grown. Color, pale greenish yellow, almost covered with" regular splashes and stripes of bright red, mottled with crimson. First hardiness.

winter.

Grimes' Golden Season January to April; vigorous spreading tree, bears early, fruit is rich yellow, flesh yellow, crisp, rich, spicy. One of the finest eating apples grown. Third

Duchess of Oldenburg Early summer; is one of the most valuable -of the Russian apples thus far introduced into this country it is a good size and attractive in appearance. The fruit ripens in succession, so that several pickings are required

—Late

reigns over a much greater extent of country than does the Baldwin; it is unquestionably the leading commercial sort. It comes into bearing at an early age and usually bears annually and abundantly. Fruit above medium to large. Skin tough, waxy, bright, smooth, usually glossy, clear yellow or greenish, mottled and washed with bright red; mildly sub-acid, good. Third hardiness.

hardiness, $3.00.



Hibernal September and October. A Russian variety, which is proving very valuable on account of its ability to withstand the rigorous climatic conditions of these regions. Prof. Hansen says that this variety represents what is probably the hardiest type of the Russian race of apples. Fruit large; surface greenish-yellow with a dull bronze mixed red on sunny side, with a few dull crimson splashes. Flesh yellowish, crisp, tender, .

juicy quality above

medium.

First hardiness.

1866

96

— HOUSE

OF GURNEY, YANKTON,



Jonathan Early winter. It is a very beautiful apple, of orilliant red color, highly flavored, and of excellent quality for either dessert or culinary use. Very hardy and productive, wealthy and vigorous, and is adapted to a wider range of terriIt is the great 'market tory than most apples of this class. apple of the west and south. Third hardiness.



Lowland Raspberry A Russian apple, medium to large, waxen white, shaded and marbled with light crimson. Flesh white often stained with red. Very tender, almost sweet, season August. Second As early as Yellow Transparent. clear

hardiness.

Longfield

— Season, September and October.

Fruit

medium

decidedly attractive appearance, being .clear waxen yellow, brushed with bright red. Flesh white, crisp, fine, very tender and of the most pleasant quality. It can be classed among the fancy dessert apples. On account of the hardiness and productiveness of the tree and the beauty and quality of the fruit, Longfield is recommended for planting in almost any section of the country. First hardiness. Malinda (Colored Photo Page 93) Season, late winter. Fruit above medium to large. Skin rich yellow, with dull red Flesh yellowish-white, firm, juicy, very mild sub-acid, blush. with sweet after-taste. Fair quality. The best winter apple First hardiness. for the North. McIntosh Red— Season, September to January. The fruit is very attractive in appearance, of bright, deep red color, and good size. The flesh is very tender, perfumed and delicious. This is another of the great western and southern market apples. Thousands of acres of these are being planted in that section and are proving the most profitable of any of the orchard trees, especially in the west. Exceptionally heavy bearer at an early age. Second hardiness. size,

lightly



S.

D.— 1925



Northwestern Greening Winter, very attractive in coh> y Is valuable for the northern apple growing districts. Qualit as a dessert apple is fair to good. The tree is hardy, vigorous a fine erect grower, and comes into bearing reasonably earlj and as it grows older is an exceptionally heavy cropper. Ski smooth, somewhat waxy, clear pale yellow or greenish, some times faintly blushed. Flesh tinged with yellow, crisp an firm: mildly sub-acid, fair to good. Second hardiness. Okabena stopped growing this tree for a few year

—We

but there has been such a heavy demand from our customei

who

previously planted it that we are listing them again th: season. have an exceptionally fine stock. Season, Septen ber to December. About medium size, extremely hardy an productive, highlyjcolored a fine eating apple of high quality Patten’s Greening Season, October to January. A seed ling of the Duchess .of Oldenburg, and on account of its hard: ness and productiveness and the uniformly large size of it fruit, is valuable in the northern portions of the apple-growin regions of the country. It is grown as far north as the Canadia line, and in other regions where the winters are correspondingl It is attractive in color for a green apple. severe. Very gbo in quality; comes into bearing moderately young and is a annual cropper, yielding moderate to full crops. First hard: ness. Specially good in North Dakota. Price’s Sweet Season, August to November. Very ur right grower, early, and annual bearer of medium sized, excel lent quality, green striped with red, sweet apples. This is th best of all of the sweet apples for the extreme north planting Second hardiness.

We



;



.1

i

} I

|

£ •

^ J

.

Stay man’s Wine Sap

—An improved Wine Sap;

fruit rec

?i

ti

?i

j

F

larger than the olWine Sap; a better tree, and longer lived; one of the Gren Western commercial apples. Second hardiness. juicy, sub-acid,

a long keeper; apple

is



Tolman’s Sweet Fruit medium size, bright yellow much esteemed for cooking. In ordinary storage its sea is from November to January. This is an excep

?

degree of hardines?



son

?

1 j

tionally sweet apple.

Trees are

first



Wolf River Season, October to December. One c the largest apples grown. Tree grows to immense size very productive, bright red, fair quality, splendid cool; ing apple. Second hardiness.

n



Wealthy (Colored Photo, Page 93) Season, Septen, ber to January. This variety we consider the mos valuable of all the market apples and for home use The tree is exceptionally hardy, comes into bearing a early as the summer apples, producing immense crop annually, and we believe it is the most valuable, appl today for the small or the large orchard. This wa originated by Peter M. Gideon, of Minnesota. Frui above medium to large; color, underlaid with pale yellow blushed and marked with stripes and splashes of rec deepening in highly colored specimens to brilliant red very attractive. Flesh, whitish, tinged with red whe thoroughly ripe. Moderately fine, crisp, tender an juicy, agreeably sub-acid; good to extra good. Firs

]

3

I

. :

hardiness.

Yellow Transparent (Colored Photo, Page 93)Earliest summer. This is the best of the extra earl 1 apples, being excellent for culinary and dessert. ripens earlier than the Early Harvest; fruit medium t large. Tree moderate grower, very hardy, healthj comes into bearing very young. Imported from Russi by the United States Department of Agriculture in 1S7( Skin thin, tender, smooth, waxy, pale vellow changin to an attractive yellowish-white. Flesh w hite, tende: Fin juicy, with a pleasant flavor; good to extra good. hardiness.

,

Sj

I

T

,

r

p

p

1866

— HOUSE

OF GURNEY, YANKTON,

S.

D.

— 1925

97

A BASKET OF MALI ND A—THE BEST WINTER APPLE

Crab Apples



Gurney's Seedless Crab This is an excellent crab, slightly above medium in size, free from seed, of good quality, nothing gpetter for pickling. The tree has proven hardy in western JSouth Dakota under severe conditions and a heavy annual |

Tbearer.

3-4

ft.,

each, 70c; per

5, $3.09.

Florence (Colored Photo, Page 93) mercial planting because the tree





Very desirable for comcommences bearing very

Fruit young, is a reliable cropper and extremely prolific. good size, very attractive in appearance and good quality. Originated by Peter M. Gideon in Minnesota. Color, yellowish white, overspread with brilliant pinkish red. Flesh tinged with yellow, crisp, tender, juicy, very brisk subacid; good. August and early September. First hardiness.



Hyslop Season, September and October. Fruit large, very brilliant color, dark red or purplish, overspread with thick blue bloom; borne in clusters. The tree is a good grower, very hardy and a reliable cropper, yielding good, crops anIt is desirable for both home use and for market. nually. First hardiness.



Soufard This is a hybrid between the native Wild Crab and the common apple. It is a very desirable crab for several purposes. It is delicious baked, and makes excellent preserves, and one of the best for jams and jellies. The tree comes early, into bearing, makes rapid growth while young, slower as it increases with age. Excellent as an ornamental tree. The leaf is very rough, the bark lighter than most crabs. The blossom is similar to the wild crab and very fragrant. Season, all winter.

First hardiness.

Dolga

First hardiness.

— Oblong crab of rare beauty and peculiar lemon acid

flavor entirely different

Ho pa Small crab excellent for jelly and pickling. This is In early spring the tree is entirely really an ornamental tree. hidden with red flowers, followed by foliage that shows considerable red.

The

fruit is red to the core.

Sweet Russets

— Season,

Each, 92c, 5 for $4.00.

August and September.

This

the sweet crab apples. Fruit large, green, is the best of It is the very best of its kind russet, with faint blush. and especially for pickles and preserves. from the tree for eating Very hardy, and regular bearer. First degree hardiness. all

Transcendent bright red crab. ling,

very hardy.

— Season,

The

September.

old

standard

Excellent for canning, preserves, and pickMakes an immense tree. First hardiness.



Minnesota Originated in Minnesota, fruit very large, thin skin and pale yellow, slightly mottled on sunny side. Flesh Season, September and October, fine-grained and sub-acid. first degree of hardiness.



Whitney (Colored Photo, Page 93) Season, August and September. One of the most popular of the large crab apples, particularly in the west and north; the fruit is attractive, yellow, striped with lively red, good for dessert and very good, for Tree is a thrifty, upright grower, comes into bearcanning. First hardiness. ing very young and is extremely productive.





Briers Sweet Season, September and October. Tree vigorous, hardy, comes into bearing young and is productive. Fruit pale yellow, washed with lively red, striped with carmine. Flesh yellowish, fine-grained, juicy, pleasant, good in flavor

and quality.

other crab for jelly. The tree is uniform and exceptionally hardy. When filled with the large dark red fruit the tree appears from a distance to be covered with dark red flowers. Each, 92c; 5 for $4.00.

from any other crab.

Superior to any

Prices of Apples

Yellow Siberian -Fruit medium size, clear pale yellow; an Tree very hardy, excellent crab for pickles and preserves First hardiness. healthy, comes into bearing very young.



Virginia Season, September to November. Fruit medium-sized, dark red, and good quality. One of the hardiest and very, free from blight. A strong grower. This variety will produce fruit under more adverse conditions than any First hardiness. other tree we know of.

and Crabs when not priced otherwise

5 to 6 ft 4 to 5 ft 3ito 4 ft.

Each

Per 10

Per 50

70c

$6.00 5.00 3.50

$29.00 24.00 14.00

.

.

.55c

40c

Grafting

Tree Protectors These are made of veneering about one-sixteenth of an inch thick and ten by twenty inches square. They must be soaked for a few minutes in water, then bent around the tree and secured by a string or wire. They are extremely valuable and almost a necessity as trees are ordinarily grown. In placing them they should be nearly closed at the top to prevent mice from crawling over and getting inside. They protect from: Borers, Mice, Rabbits, Sunscald and Bark Bursting. Price, $1.65 per 50; $3.90 per 109; per 10, 50c.

Per 100 $55.00 45.00 26.00

Wax

the same recipe that we use at the nursery for grafting and -covering scars where trees are trimmed.

This

is

made from

to be used for all out or indoor grafting. If you success of out-door top or other kinds of grafting, This is the identical formula that we It should also be used to coyer use in our nurseries successfully. wounds, such as barking of the tree trunks by rabbits, covering Put up in one pound boxes at wounds from trimming. 60c per box, postpaid; 5 lbs., $2.00; 10 lbs., $3.75.

This wax

are to

is

make a

you must use wax.

1866

98

— HOUSE

Dwarf Apples

OF GURNEY, YANKTON,

for

S.

D.— 1925

Early Bearing and Extreme Hardiness.

Apple trees are propagated in various ways and are of various classes. The standard or the apple that is ordinarily sold to you is produced by grafting or budding on what is known as the French crab root. The seed producing this root comes from the Perry making section of Southern France and was never intended to be used in the extreme north, where hardiness of root 'is even more necessary than hardiness of the top. You can plant the hardiest variety and if the root on which it is growing is not entirely as hardy as the top, the first test winter, a winter with but little snowfall, dry ground and low temperature, kills the root and the tree is gone. To overcome this, we use two varieties: the Pyrus Baccata, the hardiest of all varieties, which produces a semi-dwarf apple and comes into bearing early; the other, the Pyrus Paradisica,

which makes a complete dwarfed tree, which produces fruit generally the second year after planting, fruit equally as large as the standard and semi-dwarf, quality unchanged, bears heavily, and is especially desirable on small grounds where you have room for but few trees, desirable to everybody on account of its extremely early bearing.

I

j I

Qthf

in

j

In propagating apple trees in, our nurseries, we use only these two roots: Pyrus Baccata and Pyrus Paradisica. offer the following varieties of strictly dwarf apples on Pyrus Paradisica: Whitney, Yellow Transparent, McIntosh

We

j

E

-L

Red, Wealthy and Duchess.

Ter

bud

Two years each, 75c; one each, five varieties, $2.80. Per 10, $5.75; per 50, $25.00; per 100, $50.00.

have talked to you on the last few pages about apples. I want to add just a few words more. In making your selection of varieties confine them principally to those best in your own neighborhood. I would say for a small orchard for your own use select the following. All are hardy and ripen in rotation as named: Yellow Transparent, Duchess, Longfield, Wealthy and MaSinda. This gives you apples from July to May. Select a few crab apples, just enough for home use. Whitney, Florence and Sweet Russet. There are other fruits just as easily grown as the apple and your orchard should have as complete an assortment as posEarly Richmond Cherry, if you are located south of sible. Huron, S. D. Not profitable north of that. Compass

A

sider

cam

plat

I

con

V







Lari

]

ven

due!

the

Bit

lata



lion

era

west

A

in the north of

In fact.

them the

all-purpose, easiest grown fruit for this great American people the fellow with a little piece of dirt. They grow easily, produce immense quantities of fruit the next year after planting, and what’s the use of waiting for slower-bearing kinds? When I get to talking “Hansen” fruits I have to put on the brakes or I would use the whole catalog. They’re great, that’s all, and I want you to know it. Don’t forget the small fruits the strawberry everbearing and common the raspberry, gooseberry, currant, the Buffalo berry and choke cherry, for a hedge, maybe, around the orchard. row of mulberries, fruiting heavily for the birds and lots over to can with currants and gooseberries. You can all grow fruit; you can live better; you can live cheaper, and at such a small initial cost, so little labor, and such pleasant labor.

I

C011!

SOD

Something About Fruit

Cherry and Hansen Plums take the place all cherries, and of a great many other fruits.

tha

ries,

con-

$36,

Me; S6.C j

Foundation for Your Orchard A foundation or a large building

is never built of mud; the architect in making the y tos knows that it is necessary to build this of concrete granite, or othei very durable material and specifies it in making his plans. The owner of the building follows the specifications, knowing, as the architect did, the necessity for a good foundation; in fact, it is the important part of the whole building; if the foundation settles or goes to pieces the balance of the building goes quickly and the money invested and the work of the

one or two years

took to build it are lost. probably more so, that the foundation for your orchard should be.right, because an orchard is the work of a lifetime and is expected to last a lifetime. You builders of houses and large buildings never attempt to commence operations unless you have first made your plans from the foundation to the last item of furnishing. In starting the orchard it is just as important that you make the plans also and then follow them carefully. First, choose the location, bearing in mind convenience, quality and lay of land; the best location for an orchard is a north or northeast slope; the poorest a sharp southwest slope. The quality of land is not so important, as you can always give the land what it lacks. Protection should hardly be considered, as you can always make that faster than you can the orchard, and we want to say a few w ords about the protection of an orchard. Windbreak: A windbreak of several rows of trees should be planted to protect the orchard from the south and west; that is, the windbreak should be planted on the south and west sides of the orchard. This windbreak should be planted far enough away from the orchard so that the snow will not drift in and destroy the trees, and so that the orchard w ill not be robbed of its food and moisture. A light windbreak on the north is necessary, although some planters prefer a row or two of the hardier varieties of apples or crabs for such purpose. Orchards are not always injured by the cold, but more often by the heat. Orchards planted on the south side of a north and west windbreak are in more danger than if the windbreak was not there. The damage to orchards is caused more often in March than any other month. At that time we often have a week or ten days of rather warm weather, and the sap starts to flow the w arm weather is followed by a severe cold w hich injures it

It is just as necessary,

7

1 lute full

of

i

colo

exet

and 4-5

10

f

Z fin

wild

bins

tie.

tie

year

Zar

“lea trial

and

ares ft,,

ft,,

T

7

7

7

;

the

wood

causing the tree to gradually decay. If the protection had been on the west and south they would have been protected from this warm spell, the trees w ould remain dormant and in good condition in the spring. Trees planted on the south of a windbreak bloom much earlier and are caught by the frosts. Where possible, have the windbreak on the south and wr est rather than on the north. Second, figure the number of trees you are going to need. Apple trees should be planted from 25 to 40 feet apart, depending on the section in which vou live; the farther south, the greater distance apart; the farther north, cells,

7

.

PLANTING AN APPLE TREE

sit

a

* -at

a

t-.™

t-

This picture shows a perfect apple tree planted at the right distance from other trees, ground cultivated and in good condition. Apple trees should be planted far enough apart so that the sun and circulation of air can get to all parts of them. If planted too close the under limbs are shaded and the crop is forced toward the top of

£he closer together.

Plums and cherries can be planted from 12 to 22 feet apart, and we find a saving of ground to first plant the apple orchard, then in the square 0f each four trees place a plum or cherry; by the time the apple trees need a ii the ground the plum and cherry have outlived their usefulness and can it

be removed. Third, select your varieties. This is the most important step of all, and should be considered carefully. To show you the importance of the selection the tree, and eventually the tree becomes of no G f varieties, I wish to call to ypur mind the nearest bearing orchard to your Plant apple trees in the extreme north place. value. If this has been In every community there is a bearing orchard. not less than 20 feet apart each way. Head planted a good many years you wall note that a great many of the trees are them just as close to the ground as possible, missing there are a few exceptionally healthy varieties that produce large Farther south they can be planted farther apart, annual crops these are the varieties you want in your orchard. If you could and can be headed a little higher. find the original planter of this orchard and he had. k-ept a record of been in any other business pur father was a nurseryman before his purchase, you would find a selection of a great many us, and his father before him, and that this catalog is our varieties planted there, and only two or three, or at the out60th annual catalog; that our experience in tree planting side, five or six varieties have done well in that particular extends from coast to coast, from the Gulf of Mexico into When you build your house or the section of the country. Canada, and that we know the best varieties for your particular big building you tell the architect about what you w ant, and locality? And we are going to advise that you leave the selecyou leave the details to him, for the reason that he has tion of varieties as much to us as possible, giving us always as experience along these lines and you can depend on him. Do much information as you can as to your choice and to the you realize when you are dealing with us that you are dealing names of the bearing trees in your particular locality. w ith men who were born in the nursery business, have never ;

;

;

7

7

T1 It

eice

Cka

perl is

a

pk



and

TI

Prof.

1866

— HOUSE

OF GURNEY, YANKTON,

S.

D.

— 1925

99

Cherries Richmond

Early

More extensively planted than all p-

Fruit ripens n a shorter period ;han the other cheries, and on that acsount is not bothered ;o much by the birds.

athers.

English McrelSo —Late, large, black. T

ery hardy in fruit Excellent for

K ucL

Do

lanning.

not

above cherries Huron, S. D.

>lant

lorth of

Mt. Morency—

jarge red, rich, acid, rery hardy and proluctive. Similar to lie Early Richmond, >ut ripens two weeks Does excepater.

ionally well in west>rn

Nebraska

vestern Kansas.

and 5-6

each, 90c; per L0, $3.00; per 50, >36.00; 4-5 ft., each, 10c; per 10, $7.00; per 50, $33.00; 3-4 56.00; per 50, $27.00. t.,

EARLY RICHMOND CHERRY ft.,

each, 70c; per 10,

ways be retained on the fruit list, though it is much smaller in than any of the Hansen plums. Do not understand by this Compass Cherry is only valuable because it fills in a

size

that the

Choke Cherry one of the best of our ornamental fruit trees. AbsoAlways symmetrical, and when in utely hardy anywhere. full bloom, is a great bank of snow with the added beauty >f its nutty woodland fragrance, and later its rich, highly :olored, purplish-black fruity Our western dwarf varieties This

is

:xceed all others in quality of fruit.

3-4

xnd jam.

ft.,

EsDecially fine for jelly

20c each; 10 for $1.75; 50 for $7.00; 50 for $9.50; 5-6 ft., 30c each;

1-5 ft., 25c each; 10 for $2.00; L0 for $2.50; 50 for $11.00.



Zumbra Cherry Originated in Minnesota, is a cross of the Pin Cherry, the large Sweet Cherry of the west coast and the It seems to be a happy comlvild Sand Cherry of the Dakotas. pination as Zumbra is as hardy as the Sand Cherry, grows like fruit large and the is as and as good quality as Cherry Pin phe Comes into bearing the next ;he California Sweet Cherry. >rear after planting, very prolific, maturing large annual crops. Zumbra is placed on the Minnesota recommended fruit list as “leading variety” in all districts except No. 6, in No. 6 for trial, the South line of No. 6 is the South line of St. Louis, Itasca and Beltrami counties. Zumbra ripens after all sour cherries Price: 2 to 4 are gone. Follows closely after Waneta plum. ft., 65c each; 5 for $3.00; 10 for $5.75; 25 for $13.00; 4 to 6 ft., each, 85c; 5 for $4.00; 10 for $7.50.

Compass Cherry This tree produces the

first

year after planting.

It bears invariably at two years old large quantities of most In size it is larger than the Early Richmond

excellent fruit.

The

between the cherry and the plum. The bherry. perfectly hardy fruit was originated at Springfield, Minn., and native Sand Cherry and the American the between is a cross blum. The fruit brings the best prices of any on the market, xnd the demand has never been supplied. The Compass Cherry ripens at a time when none of the Prof. Hansen plums are ripening and for that reason it will al-

M.

quality

is

It has a different flavor, is one of the very best for canning pxirposes. 3-4 ft., each, 55c; 10 for $5.00; 4-5 ft., each, 80c; 10 for $7.50; 50 for $35.00; 5-6 ft., each, $1.00; 10 for $9.50; 50 for $40.00. Moscow Cherry I want to call special attention to the recent introduction by Prof. Hansen of the Moscow Cherry. I have been in the nursery business in the Northwest all my life, and previous to the introduction of the Moscow, cherries could not be produced safely more than fifty miles north of Yankton, and it has deprived the northern home-builders of this delicious

space.



fruit.

Prof. Hansen realized the lack of a genxiine cherry for the cold Northwest, and in his numerous Russian exploration

he discovered this cherry growing where the temperature was considerably lower, snowfall lighter, and all conditions more strenuous than any part of North or South Dakota. These trees were long-lived, producing large quantities of cherries equal to or larger than the Early Richmond, and on his return from Russia and after demonstrating that these were good for the Northwest, we secured a supply from him 4-6 ft., and we now have a small lot ready for market. trips

each, $1.10.



Hansen's improved Sand Cherry Wonderful improvement over the common native sand cherry of western South Dakota. Something that is worth while in every garden. The fruit is larger and of excellent quality. Should be grown Makes an excellent division hedge between the in bush form. garden and yard. Produces fruit the first year after planting. 15c each; 5 for 65c; 10 for $1.00.



Apricots In one of Professor Budd’s early trips to Russia, he found an apricot that was hardy enough in growth to stand the rigorous climate of a far northern section, the fruit buds killed some winters depending on conditions, but fruited in Iowa often enough to make them a desirable addition to the fruit list. The apricot is a very rapid growing beautiful tree, loading itself with large annual crops in localities where I do not advise it for trial North tlie fruit buds do not kill. of Yankton. 5 to 6 feet, each, 85c; 5 for $4.00: 10 for $7.00,

Regan, City Recorder, Scott County, Minn., April 22, 1924. the shipment of trees for the City and are much pleased with them, good condition upon arriving here. Thanking you again for the splendid shipment of trees. L.

We received

all in

They

are certainly fine trees

and were

YANKTON,

1866— HOUSE OF GURNEY,

100

S.

D.— 1925

Buffalo Berry This is very useful as well as ornamental, and is planted as much for an ornament as for its fruit. The tree grows from 7 to 12 feet high, has silvery foliage. The fruit is much like that of the Red Currant, and 23The Buffalo Berry makes an excellent is used for the same purposes. hedge. 18-24 inch. 3 ft

4

ft.

Each

Per 10

Per 100

.$0.25 .30 .35

$1.75 2.20 3.00

$15.00 19.00 25.00

Juneberry Dwarf Mountain this valuable tree. Some grow* to the They are variously called “Shadberry,” “Serviceheight of 20 feet. kind offer grows but little over 4 feet we The “Juneberry.” berry,” in height, is enormously productive and hardy anywhere in the United strain and is of all. Each, Jefferson best the This is States or Canada. 30c; 10 for $2.70.

There are several species of

Mulberry

4-

useful as a shade tree, for hedge purposes, and for the are listing the Russian Mulimmense quantity of fruit borne by it. berry only, as it is the hardiest of all. The fruit varies in color from jet black to a pure -white and is excellent for canning with tart fruits like gooseberries, currants and plums. It is delicious to eat direct from the trees They make an excellent ornamental hedge that will stand trimming. Per 10 Per 100 Per 1,000 Each

The Mulberry

is

We

12-18 inch 18-24 inch 2-3 ft 6 ft

€has. Saxine, Bayfield County, Wise,

$0.20 .30

1924,

helpmate harvesting apples from Gurney. a five-year old Duchess pf Oldenburg purchased from the House of I

am

enclosing a photograph of

my

little

Pears



of bearing pear trees in Aankton County. They had seven varieties of localities than apples. in grown S. Dakota. Pears have been all pears at the State Fair in this part of the state for the last twenty years, are thirty years old and are producing immense crops of

Pears We have hundreds seem to do even better in some

We

The pears grown here are of much better quality than part of the world. Wh did not- have them in small plates, bushel, all grown in Yankton County. , As the pears send their roots straight down, the sou should be loosened to Be sure the considerable depth either by digging or blasting with dynamite. dirt is well settled before planting the trees. We are offering the varieties that have proved hardiest and given the best results. Clapp'S Favorite. Tree a vigorous; upright, spreading grower, very hardy and productive. Fruit large, pale yellow, flesh fine grained, juicy, melting and sweet. better than Bartlett I find this to be the best early pear for the Middle West, much seems to stand our climate better. Ripens end of August. ,





Flemish Beauty

—Large,

juicy, rich;

one of the hardiest and most popular.

September and October. Keiffer



large

Its

size,

handsome

appearance and remarkable keeping and shipping qualities make it exceedingly October and profitable for market.

November.

Anjou

—A

large

One

ductive. for the

pear,

Very pro-

highly flavored.

of the best

middle west.

Duchess

—One

the of for the fine large^ north. Not very Keeps quality, and juicy.

very

best

pears

well into the winter. 4-6 ft., each, 70c; per 10, $6.50.

Dwarf Pears

—We

find

the Dwarf Pear bearing within two years, generally transplanting, and after seems to be quite a bit hardier than the standard

We

would advise the planting of the dwarf in the extreme north; in fact, we would advise anyone planting pear trees to plant one or two of the

pears.

dwarf varieties on account of the extreme hardiness

GOOD ONES, GROWN IN YANKTON CO., S. D.

and their early bearing. We have the following varieties in Dwarf Pears: Flemish Beauty and Keiffer, 2 year. Each, 70c; per 5, S3.C0.

$1.00 2.75

$1-50 2.00 3.75

$11.00 14.00

1866— HOUSE OF

GURNEY, YANKTON,

S.

D.

— 1925

101

Hansen Hybrid Pears We

have propagated these pears for 7 years, and they have proven absolutely hardy in the last 7 winters, and the winter of 1920 was the most severe test winter we have had for twenty years.

We

are offering you a few of these pears with a strong belief that they prove strictly hardy, blight-proof, and produce pears of fair size and and in most cases will be excellent ornamental trees as well as

will

quality,

fruit trees. I

we

want you to

believe in

We

distinctly understand in purchasing these trees that shall plant a good orchard of them ourselves.

them and

have budded these on the hardy quince stock that has stood

This has a tendency last six winters, equally as well as the pear itself. half-dwarf these trees, and makes them bear very early. It will only be a question of a short time before you can determine the full value of Hansen pears.

Each

Size 5-7 ft. 3-5 ft

10 $7.00 5.50

80c 60c

Quince



lap Quince Hardy south of Yankton without winter protection. With a little protection of straw or dirt it will do well and produce fruit Has a very dark red flower that is attractive that is valuable for conserves. throughout the spring.

3

ft.,

heavy, each, 50c; per

5, $2.25.

Agronomist and State Seed Commissioner, Idaho. C. B. Ahlsen, Field

The Cossack

alfalfa is

proving especially suitable

sandy areas in Idaho. The branching root system of this variety of alfalfa has caused it to gain favor as a seed producing strain in the State. The blossoms are even more variegated than Grimm’s alfalfa and can be distinguished to a certain degree from the Grimm’s. for the

The rooting system of this variety does not show the large tap and branch roots that you find in the common and Grimm’s variety. The rooting system, apparently Grimm’s. is

Brother George with an Opata

finer

than the rooting system

Plum Limb

Sapa and Opata Plums, and Others of the Sand Cherry Cross, and How to Grow Them We have demonstrated by a number of years of practical experimenting that all of the plums of Sand Cherry blood should be grown in bush form instead of tree form. By doing this you get nearly twice the fruit, and the tree will last longer. This includes Compass Cherry as well. It is always easier to pick your plums up than to pick them down, and since you gain a number of years in the life of a tree, and get a greater quantity of fruit each season it is better to grow them this way.



Hansen’s Hardy Plums Defy the elements. 10 Each 5

Size

50

$3.90 2.90

$7.59

4-5 ft

85c 65c

5.50

$34.00 25.00

3-4 ft

50c

2.25

4.20

18.50

5-7 ft

Waneta

100 $60.00 49.00 36.00

—This year same price as above.

Mrs. M. L. Fredenburg, LaMoure County, N. D.

Dec. 15,

1924. I

am enclosing two photographs

of two of the in the Spring of 1922.

Waneta plum

trees

purchased from you Last summer, summer of 1923, I picked one-half bushel of plums from the two trees. Some of them measured better than 434 inches in circumference. They were certainly fine, large plums. A number of people stopped to see them and could hardly believe that trees planted only one year could bear like that.

WANETA PLUM

3

YEARS OLD

of.

18 66—

102

HOUSE OF GURNEY, YANKTON,

PROF. HANSEN’S his inventions of fruit, extended the profitable fruit-growing belt over the He wide, barren prairies of the Northwest. has made it possible for every man, woman and child, with a piece of land, to produce, cheaper than they can buy it, all of the fresh fruit they could use, during each season, and enough extra to can to last the entire twelve months. Are you producing this fruit your share of it? If not, you are passing up some of the good things of this life. Prof. Hansen has, by exploring in foreign countries, and some points that are so far north that none of us would care even to visit those places, brought to this country and' distributed alfalfa seed that will produce paying crops where alfalfa never could have been produced He is working along lines now previously. with fruit, trees and flowers, and within the next very few years, when his new creations are introduced, will astonish the fruit world. In his invention of the race of Hybrid Plums he not only surprised and astonshed the fruit world, but I believe it was something like

S.

D.

— 1925

NEW HYBRID PLUMS—VERY HARDY

He has, by

Bear Delicious Fruit

in 2

Years

d!

tl

bi

tl

ra

bi

fa

oi

at



tl

He

th it

II te

or

ex

tl tl

BUDDING

PROFESSOR HANSEN’S NEW PLUMS ATJDUR EVERGREEN NURSERY, YANKTON

250,000

a “Jack in the

box” to him, and I would bet 30 cents that he dodged Think of a plum tree, no some when he saw the results. _

larger around than a lead pencil, only four feet high, one single sprout one year old, coming two, maturing as high as

30 plums, each plum measuring more than one inch through. This is a common occurrence in the nursery rows, and lots of the trees twb years old, coming three, will produce half to Think of having ripe plums three-fourths of a bushel of fruit. in the middle of July, instead of waiting until the middle of August. Think of having ripe plums in the middle of July Think of having plums of the most delicious until it freezes. taste, tender skinned and exquisite fragrance, and quantities enough so that you need bushel baskets to pick them in. Think of having plums that are hardy enough to stand any degree of winter, temperature and any amount of extremely hot,

dry summer weather. Leaves of tropical appearance, fruit colored from the light reds to the jet blacks. If you can think or imagine any or all of the above you will simply think or imagine what the Hansen Hybrid Plums actually are, and you can prove every word of it by giving them a fair trial in your garden or orchard. They are wonderful keepers. We packed in a small w ooden box holding about one quart a quantity of the Hanska and shipped them to San Francisco, California, with instructions to reship after sampling them, to New York City. We instructed New York in turn on receiving the package to sample

the fruit, report its condition and reship to us. We are printing reports of the San Francisco and New' York parties, and our report is that the fruit reached us in reasonably fair condiIt w as sixteen days in the mail, opened, inspected and tion. repacked twice, and still reached us in marketable shape.

of

tji

gr<

no:

dei

rai

an

ivil

ao,

r

PROF. HANSEN’S Wonderful Sapa and Opata Plums W. Cook, Moody County, S. D. Apr. 26,

one

G,

Mr

tre>

1924 .

The 500 Dunlap Straw-

giv

have arrived and have been planted and are

fan

berries

spr ’

doing

fine.

The Dewberries were the

tbs

order of Nursery stock I have ever received.

finest

w 1

PL



Opata Sioux Indian for “bouquet.” First to ripen. At blooming time it is a gigantic bouquet of w'hite flowers of most exquisite fragrance. Blooming just a little later than the American plum, it escapes frost dangers. Again, when the fruit is ripe, combine the large leathery foliage and the dark purplish red fruit, with blue bloom. It is indeed a bouquet at that time. The Opata is a cross from the Dakota Sand Cherry and the Gold Plum, originated by Luther Burbank, and for which $3,000 was paid when first introduced. Tree is vigorous in growth, heading very low and of quite spreading habits, and we recommend that you allow' it to grow rather in this form than in the regular high trunked, trimmed, tree form. It forms fruit buds freely at one year old and bears without exception the next year. Color of flesh green, flavor very pleasant, combining the spiey acid of the Sand Cherry with the rich sweetness of the Gold Plum. Ripens with us about July 15th, and will hang on the trees in good condition for about two weeks. The photograph we are showing is taken almost at random from any of the hundreds of trees in the nursery and shows the fruit as it clusters about the limbs in a mass almost from the ground to the tip end. Makes a fine spreading tree about 8 ft. tall or may be growm in bush form.



Cheresota This is practically the same as the Sapa. Plums slightly larger, ripen ten days to two weeks later. An excellent addition to the collection.

From Cedar County News, Hariington, Neb. HIS APPLES MUCH MORE LIKE PUMPKINS As an apple raiser, M. A. Becker is giving a fine demonstration of his ability to raise pumpkins. Anyway, he is picking something off his apple trees that looks more like pumpkins than apples, as far as their size is concerned. They are of the Wolf River variety, and

if they do belong to the apple family, they are certainly the grand-daddies of the whole clan. One was brought into the News office this week weighing one pound and four ounces, and measured 15 inches around. Mr. Becker explained it had not yet got its full growth, but w'ould have been a fair sized apple, if he had left it on the tree a few minutes longer. It was divided among the News staff and what was left over went to make half a dozen apple pies. (Note)— The above apple trees w'ere furnished by the Gurney Seed & Nursery Company many years ago.

qu, ear fro

poi

191

col

sac

1866 Sapa

i

— HOUSE

— Sioux Indian for BLACK.



OF GURNEY, YANKTON,

S.

D.— 1925

103

As

lark as the shades of evening ranked in 'he western heavens.” Turning the tranches of this tree back and exposing -be long ropes of glossy black fruit to the ays of the sun, the background of the Drown smooth bark and glossy dark green loliage is certainly a pleasant sight and kne to be remembered. This fruit is eatible and hangs on the tree for more than jhree weeks. When it first commences to (nature the skin is dark green and the ^esh of the royal purple. The color of jhe skin and flesh gradually changes until t is as black as the darkest midnight. The skin of this variety is especially ender and practically disappears with Ordinary canning. This plum makes xcellent preserves and jelly and is of he finest quality for eating fresh from 1

he

tree.

Waneta I

Placed on the recommended fruit list f all Northwestern states as the highest

hardiest and most profitable to [row of any. It is not alone good for the orthwest. I saw them producing wonerful crops of plums as large as any other rariety grown in California, in fact I !m firmly of the opinion that Waneta .ill be the most profitable plum for our rest coast customers as it is of large i.ze, best quality, heavy annual bearer nd a wonderful shipper. (ype,

(

1

An orchard of Wanetas four years lanted at South Dakota State Hospital ei e at Y ankton produced last season ver four bushels per tree, and nearly as lany the year previous. Waneta

is

the most rapid growing of

We

ny plum.

have produced trees at

year old as much as ten feet high, dr. Topp of our Greenhouses planted a ree at his home four years ago; it has ;iven him all the plums he needed for the amily and is now fifteen feet high and preads nearly as much. Waneta should always cost a little more jhan other varieties. -

|ne

WANETA %

Waneta, the Most Delicious of All Plums This

is

Mums.

unquestionably Prof. Hansen’s masterpiece in It

combines hardiness, immense

size, delicious

long keeping, beautiful color, small pit, and arly bearing, often producing a good crop in two years juality,

rom “

planting.

My

belief is that in this variety I have combined the best loints of the native and the Japanese plum. It is probably the argest of over 10,000 seedlings. The size here at Brookings in -912 was two inches diameter; weight, two ounces. Good, red Pedigree the ;olor; skin free from acerbity, flavor delicious. iame as Kahinta I introduced last year. The female parent is

SIZE

the Apple plum, a large Japanese variety originated by Luthei Burbank of California; the male parent is Terry, the largest native (Prunus Americana) plum, originated by the late H. A. Terry of Iowa. The Waneta plum was exhibited at the South Dakota State Fair at Huron in September, 1912, by the Horticultural Department of this Station. Waneta was a “Yanktonais boy from the wilds of the James river,” who won fame in the War of 1812, and became a great chief.

The Waneta plum is absolutely the largest and undoubtedly the best of all the Prof. Hansen introductions, and this means they are better than anything grown at the present time in any part of the country. The fruit of the Waneta has reached the size of two inches in diameter. Just take a ruler and place your two thumb nails on it two inches apart and you have the size of the Waneta. With reasonable cultivation it is as large as a small apple, as large as a good large peach, and is hardy anywhere in the northwest. An early and immense bearer.

Professor Hansen’s



Long Keeping Hanska

Prof. Hansen’s Hanska Plum (Sioux Indian for Tall), and refers to the extraordinary growth and symmetrical shape of the Hanska plum tree. The Hanska- does not come into bearing as early as those varieties containing Sand Cherry blood, but three and four year old trees in the nursery were loaded with most- excellent fruit. The Hanska was produced by crossing a wild Northwestern plum with the very large, which is so, very popfirm-fleshed, fragrant apricot plum of China— Prunus Simoni ular in all of the orchards of California. ^This variety has all of the good qualities a plum should have. The Hanska is a very large plum, a great many specimens measuring better than inches in diameter. It is of the best quality for eating from the None of the California or native tree, for canning, preserving, or making jelly. American plums compare with it in any way. In color it is a bright red with heavy blue bloom. In shape it resembles its male parent, the Apricot plum. To see this tree in the nursery, its tropical foliage, its limbs laden with the luscious reddish-blue fruit; to get on the lee side of it and catch its fragrance, is a pleasure that can only be exceeded by the actual eating of the fruit, and we invite you to come to the nursery this summer and participatewith us in this pleasure. As a shipper no other plum compares with it. As we have told you in the general description of the Hansen plums, this is the variety we sent by mail from Yankton to San Jose, Cal., from San Jose to New York, and from New York back to Yankton, and reached here in fairly good condition.



Mr. and Mrs. Elmer YVaterbury, Carter, S. Dak. I want to tell you how much we enjoyed the fruit we have bought of you in I am enclosing a picture of mother and myself standing by one of the Compass cherry trees. It is just bending to the ground with its heavy weight of Many of our neighbors come to look fruit, and my Beta grapes are just loaded. at the fruit we have purchased from you. the past.

MRS.

WATERBURY

1866

104

— HOUSE

OF GURNEY, YANKTON,

S.

D.— 1925 Kaga Of the same pedigree as the Hanslca; ripens with us just a than the Hans'ka and seems to be a little larger and a little better quality. The fruit has occasionally cracked on the tree when we had extremely wet weather during the ripening period. We find this about onequarter to one-half inch larger in diameter than the Hanska, and believe it will be one of the main little earlier

market known.

varieties as soon as well This is one of the very desirable shipping plums.

KAGA, TWO-THIRDS NATURAL SIZE. NOTICE SMALL PIT Wastesa One of Professor Hansen’s introductions. A pure From G. B. Moon, Lankershim, Calif. American tame plum, extra large, of high quality. An annual I used your seed when I Please send your 1923 catalog. bearer. We can furnish this variety in the three to four-foot lived in Minneapolis and liked them so well that I want to size only. use them out here. Hansen’s Hardy Plums Defy the Elements. Size Each Per 5 Per 10 Per 50 Per 100 Peaches 5-7 ft $66.00 85c $34.00 $3.90 $7.50 These are successfully and even profitably grown in central 4-5 ft 49.00 2.90 5.50 25.00 Minnesota by laying down and covering for winter. Prof. 3-4 ft 2.25 4.20 18.50 36.00 50c Budd says an acre can be handled as easily as an acre of blackWaneta-—This year same price as above. berries. My experience confirms it. We keep Bokara No. 3, Will enBailey, Crosby and Elberta, our hardiest and best.





Plums

American dure mild winters unprotected. Hardier than any of the This consists of tame plums that have been commonly 4-5 ft., each, 50c; 10 for $4.50; 50 for $20.00. seedlings. Do not neglect to include a few of these iny for years. Gurney’s Dakota Peach The hardiest peach in existence your order. We are offering the varieties that have given the has borne regular crops for the last five years, hardy in both best results throughout the northwest. wood and fruit, bud, fruit as large as Elberta, quality and color De Sota Bright yellow fruit, best in quality. Tree only very much better. We have a very limited supply this moderate grower, inclined to overbear. Fruit should be thinned. Advise those planting north of Yankton to plant season. Golden Queen An American plum originated in Iowa. this Peach on south side and close up to house or fence for proBright yellow, very productive, high quality and hardy. tection. 5 to 7 foot trees, 80c each; 5 for $3.50; 10 for $6.50. Medium to above average size. 34Omaha A medium size dark red plum. On account of its 5production under all conditions it is becoming one of the most popular of the American plums. The quality is good. The tree is very hardy. Ripens early. We can furnish these in .



grown



/





the three to four foot and four to five foot sizes only. Stella One of the largest of the American plums. Dark green turning to red. Of exquisite quality, very hardy and productive. Surprise Fruit is very large, bright red. It may easily be mistaken at a few feet distance for a tree loaded with finely colored peaches. Wyant Under good cultivation, one of the best. Prof. Budd says, 1897 “The best of all for profit.” Tree a straggling grower. Has not been troubled with “plum spot.” Wolf—This is at least as good as any for all purposes. Large, round, dull red. perfect free stone, and unexcelled for It is only excelled in quality for culinary eating from the hand purposes by the De Sota and Surprise. Yuteca An American plum introduced by Professor Hansen which has proven very productive. Of high quality and extremely hardy. Somewhat larger than the average tame





:

.



Ripens moderately early. Price American Plums 4 ft., 50c each; 10 for $4.50; 50 for $20.00. 5 ft., 80c each: 10 for $7.00; 50 for S35.0C. 6 ft., 90c each; 10 for $8.50; 50 for $40.00. Some New Plums Originated in Minnesota—These plums are all hardy, of high quality ana are now in great demand. Order them early. Red Wing Minn. No. 12. This is a variety produced by the Minnesota Fruit Breeding Station, large, free stone, peels like a peach; good quality. Hardy at Yankton. Tonka No. 21. Similar to Red Wing, a Minnesota variety a trifle earlier and hardier than the Red Wing. Underwood No. 91. Another Minnesota plum that has several of the required qualities which are, large size, hardiness, early and of good quality. Prices of Minnesota Plums 1 yr., each, 70c; per 5, $3.00; per ten, $5.80. plum.









Alvin Moreland, Meade Co., S. D. 1924. This is a picture of myself and youngster, and one of your little Opata plum trees taken last summer. It only shows part of the tree, but it was just loaded with lovely plums. You may use this in your 1925 catalog.

Root Grafts

—Apple, Plum and Pear

These are scions and roots grafted and tied together with waxed cord ready to plant. Apples should give from 75 to 95 per cent stand. Apple root grafts are put up in bunches of 50 each and bunches will not be broken. No order for root grafts will be booked after March 15th, and they wall be shipped as early in April as possible without regard to other stock ordered. Small lots w’ill go by parcel post, and they should be planted immediately on receipt of the grafts. They should be planted with a dibble as per instructions for cuttings.

Apple and Crab Root Grafts on Baccata Crab Roots, 50, $4.00; 100, $6.50; 1,000 S50.00. American Plum Root Graft Our process of putting up plums has given us for a number of years practically as good stand as with the apples. These are all grafted on the American Plum root and we can furnish them in any variety. Per 50, $3.50; per 100, $5.00. Hansen Plum Root Grafts 25 for $3.50; 50 for $6.50; 100 for $11.00. We will get the root grafts to you in good condition but we Price:





will

not replace those that

fail

to grow.

;

1866— HOUSE OF GURNEY,

YANKTON,

S.

D.

— 1925

105

Currants We

picked from this field of two-year-old plants literally thousands of quarts of the best currants. This is a real field of currants.

Currants can be grown successfully in any part of the country will produce fruit quicker than any other small fruit, and a sure annual crop. They grow and produce with almost no care, but just like any other tree or plant, will pay a hundred fold for additional care. Just give them a little cultivation, some manure worked into the soil, a little bit of trimming after the fruit is harvested, and you will have, not only fresh fruit, but quantities to can and make the best jelly. If you like a milder jelly, mix the currant juice with one-half apple juice, and it’s

and

is

delicious.



North Star Medium size; fine flavored and prized in both kitchen and market. Bush very strong grower and should have plenty of room. Produces large quantities of fruit. Red Dutch A hardy, well-known standard variety; early, a prolific bearer and does well everywhere. It is, perhaps, planted more extensively than any other variety. White Grape Large; white; sweet or mild sub-acid; very good quality and popular for dessert and kitchen, and well known in market. Bush low and spreading. Very productive.







Leen Medium large; black; fruit of fine quality, desirable for both kitchen and market. Bush a vigorous grower and very productive. L,a Versailles Very large; red; bunch long, of great beauty and excellent quality; one of the! finest and best, and should be



in every collection.

Victoria

medium sorts.

—Large; bright red; bunches extremely long; berries

size,

Good

of excellent quality.

Ripens .Hardy.

productive.

late,

making

it

erect grower, very one of the most valuable

Above varieties, unless otherwise priced; 2 year plants, 15c each; 10 for $1.30; $5.50 per 50. Perfection Currant (See back cover) You have all grown the old standard varieties of Currants, producing only a medium crop and those of small size. By the introduction of this new Perfection Currant we are doubling the crop and the





We

picked currants of this variety in our nursery this past season, nearly as large as the Early Richmond Cherry and in clusters of ten to twelve currants on each stem. When first introduced, won Berry Gold HVSetfaE at Pan-American Exposition and gold medal awarded at the Louisiana Purchase Exposition. No. 1, each, 25c; per 10, $1.90; per 100, $17.25. It is certainly a wonderful fruit and should be in all your gardens. size.

CHERRY CURRANT

Currants

We

picked from this field of twoyear-old plants literally thousands of quarts of the best currants. This is a real field of currants, and S. S. said he grew them and wanted this picture with them, so here it is.

as a Border to Driveways

Petunias,

Mr. J. P. Williamson of Havana, North Dakota, sends us this photograph, showing the driv'fp ay into his home.

You FROM

will note the fine border of Petunias with their thousands of blooms. It is only a very little labor and a few cents expense to ornament your driveway. People will know of your

farm for hundreds of miles and comment on its beauty. The picture shows Mrs. Williamson looking at the Petunias.

1866

106

— HOUSE

OF GURNEY, YANKTON,

S.

D- 1925

Blackberries Instructions for planting and care: When you receive the Blackberries they will of the old cane on them. This is left more for the purpose of handling the plant than otherwise. The new canes come up from below the ground, and produce, the fruit the next year after planting. Plant your Blackberries about 2 feet apart in the row and the rows 5 feet apart. Plant them about the same depth that they stood in the nursery. do not recommend Blackberries for any point north of Yankton in the prairie country, except in sheltered localities, but they can be grown successfully in almost any part of Minnesota in the timber country, or south of this point. have seen large fields of Blackberries grown successfully and profitably in cottonwood groves that have been thinned out either by nature, cutting, leaving open spaces and planting the roots there, allowing them to grow void. This method is worthy of trial in almost

have a certain amount

We

We

any

section.

Snyder—Undoubtedly

the hardiest variety of the Blackberry; an abundant good size, and good quality berries. 10, 60c; 100, $4.75; 500, $17.00. Eldorado One of the hardiest and most vigorous of all blackberries enduring

bearer, of



the winters of the northwest without injury. The yield is enormous, berries large, jet black and borne in large clusters. Very sweet, have no core and will keep eight to ten days after picking. A splendid blackberry. 10 for 65c; 100 for $4.95; 500 for $18.00.

Blackberries in Thin Groves It is feasible to grow profitably and satisfactorily, good crops of the above varieties of blackberries, in cottonwood or poplar groves where they are mot planted too This is especially true if the groves are growing on lower ground. closely together. As soon as planted mulch I advise planting the blackberries in the regular way. heavily with well rotted manure or old straw or hay. Put this on thick enough to keep weeds and grass from growing among the plants. If you are unable to grow them Try it in the regular way in the open field you need not give up this desirable fruit.

Dewberries Instructions for planting

and

These will be delivered the old cane attached. This is care:

you with a portion of new of no value except for handling purposes, as the cane that produces the fruit next year comes from the crown of the little plant you will receive. The Dewberry In planting, these will have a quantity of fine roots. must be spread out, the soil worked in carefully among them and the crown not covered over one and one-half inches. to

Plant 18 inches apart in the row, rows 4 to 5 feet apart. Lucrefia We do not advise planting this unless you have sandy soil, as it does better on that than on any other soil. This is a creeping plant and will often grow' as much as fifteen The vines should be trimmed back to feet in one season. about three feet for best results. The fruit is about three times the size of the Blackberry, very sweet. Price; Each,



10c; 10, 60c; 100, $3.00; 500, $12.00.

Grapes Instructions for planting and care: One of the most satisfactory fruits, and can be growm anywhere. For the extreme As you go north use the hardiest varieties, as the Beta. farther south take standard varieties, as the Concord.. A

grape vine must be protected from air from the time it is dug until it is back in the ground. They kill easily if left unprotected while out of the ground. When you receive the

These should be cut grape, it will have very long roots. back to about 6 inches in length. The hole should be dug a spade’s depth, and the roots spread out on the bottom of this hole. See that the earth is worked in well among the roots. Pack well, cultivate and fertilize, and you will have best trellis will be needed the second year after planting. results.

A

Alpha—Very hardy black grape, preferred by some to the Beta. A splendid selection of the native wild Bunches large and well grape. berries Individual shouldered. large and jet black, covered with a bluish bloom. Flavor excellent. splendid grape for making jellies.

a

A

An abundant

bearer and unsurpassed for hardiness. Needs absolutely no winter protection. Each, 30c; per 5, $1.25; per 10, $2.25; per 25, $5.00.

Agawam — An

early

ripener.

Vine strong, bearing very large berries, with soft, sweet pulp and thick Each, 20c; per 10, $1.80; skin. per 50, $8.00. people —The the

Beta Grape

* *

mov-

loss of their ing north regret Grapes, which are wonderfully attractive and refreshing in the late summer. Many the heartache and sigh of disappointment when the housewife finds she cannot grow Grapes on her new homestead or northern home. The Beta changes all this, as it will grow readily in North Dakota without covering; not only grow, but produce as much fruit per vine as the large varieties in the East, rapid growers often making a growth of 15 to 20 feet in a single season. Extremely valuable for covering summer houses, outbuildings or fences. We recognized the value of this new Grape wiien it wT as first introduced. are pleased with our success in getting it out among the growers and more proud of the success attained by the growers. r

BETA GRAPES AND COMPASS CHERRIES GROWN BY MATTIE MALTA, MONT. We

T.

CRAMER,

It has made their homes beautiful and produced immense quantities of fruit. Each, 30c; per 5, $1.25; per 10, $2.25; per 25, $5.00; per 100, S17.G0. Mennonite Society sold $465.00 worth of Beta Rockport Grapes from ninety vines in 1920. Can you beat that?

PC is?

bar

On We

the Colored Insert Page 127

are showing colored photographs of various varieties of grapes that can be grown anywhere in the northwest and as sure to produce a crop of fruit each year as any fruit you can plant. A grape requires care for best results,' but will, even under adverse conditions and neglect, produce large crops of hose delicious bunches- of grapes. The varieties offered on the Insert page 1 27 are the best in

25

hardiness, production and quality. The Beta may be left on the trellis through the winter in most sections no other grape so hardy as the Beta. The other varieties for best print a bulletin results require some winter protection. “Small Fruits” we want you to have as it will help you



We

it’s free!

h

th-

Uf

1866

— HOUSE

OF GURNEY, YANKTON,

S.

D.

— 1925

107



Beta Grape Seedlings S. S. Gurney at the nursery takes a lot of pleasure n making various crosses of fruits, flowers, etc. Two years ago he made a lumber of crosses of Beta Grapes with approximately twenty varieties of itandard large grapes. These plants are now one year old and should produce iome fine grapes, valuable new varieties, and it will be interesting for you to vatch these grow and see what the fruit will be. It is probable that most of ,hem will be at least as good as the Beta, no doubt some of them as good or In growing letter than any of the grapes with which the Beta was crossed. grapes from seed a portion of them will be male and will not produce fruit, nost of them, however, will bear abundantly. We would advise buying these iberally to plant in the vineyard or far planting along fences or out buildings. will make a very rapid growth. for $3.50; 100 for $6.00.

Hiey 10

Each, 15c; 10 for $1.25; 25 for $2.50;

From Joseph Weaver, Madison County,

la.

I am enclosing photographs of my grapevines which I purchased from These are I do not see where they could fcarry any more fruit. you. the Concords.



Champion One of the earliest of the large black grapes. With winter protection these can be successfully grown in most parts of North Dakota. Very productive, vines vigorous and Each, 15c; 10 for $1.25; hardy. 50 for $5.00.



Delaware One of the- finest table grapes, bunches not large, compact, well shouldered, berries rather small, juicy and sweet without any hard pulp. Spicy flavor, probably the best American grape, all things considered.

medium

Ripens

early,

color

red.

Each, 25c; 5 for $1.25; 10 for $2.C0; 25 for $4.50. Elvira

JOS.

Moore Early

WEAVER

White.

Bunches medium

LUCILE, ONE-THIRD SIZE

size, very compact. Berries medium and sweet splendid wine grape. Hardy, vigorous grower and productive. Ripens September. Each, 20c; 10 for $1.70. Lucile A beautiful large red grape, which yields as much as Concord; the very best quality, as hardy as any grape listed, except the Beta. A very strong, robust grower; ripens its fruit early. Vine is healthy and free from disease; never drops its Each, 30c; 10 for $2.90. berries. Lutie Grape An old standard variety. Out of twenty-five varieties of grapes that we are growing in our trial grounds the Lutie grape has led for two years. The Lutie is very vigorous and produces more fruit than any other variety in the trial grounds. It is a red grape, earlier than the Concord and probably more hardy. There is no reason why you cannot grow large quantities of these grapes, as there are but few fruits, if any, that will produce more fruit per square foot than grapes Try ten of these Each, 30c; 5 ffor^$1.30; 10 for $2.50; 25 for $5.00.

when

fully ripe.

m

A

— Similar to Concord, equally as hardy and at

ten days earlier. Very productive in rich $1.30; 50 for $8.00.

soil.

least

Each, 25c; 10 for

N. D., BETA GRAPE A red grape, seedling from the Delaware. It is above described Delaware, is more free from rot and mildew, and the berries and bunches are larger. Flavor, rich and sweet, without a trace of foxiness. The fruit keeps and ships well. This grape was originated in Canada and is highly thought of, proving perfectly hardy everywhere the Concord is grown, and possibly standing even more cold. Two weeks earlier than the Delaware, especially fine for the north. Each, 35c; 5 for $1.50; 10 for $2.90. Niagara Large, slightly oval; pale yellow, with a white blossom; the quality is equal to the Concord and it is the standard white grape of the country. Bunches are large arid compact. Vine vigorous, hardy and very productive. Each, 20c; 5 for 95c; 10 for $1.80; 25 for $3.90; 59 for $6.50. Worden Larger than Concord and ten days earlier. Hardy, healthy, vigorous and productive. Large bunches, dark purplishblack. Each, 20c; Especially good on account of its earliness.

OTTO HIMLER, WILLISTON, Moyer Grape



similar to the

middle of SeptemThis is one of the most popular, ber.



Mid-season. Each, 20c; 10 for $1.00; 25 for $2.30; 50 for $4.00; 100 for $7.00.

and composed of large amber colored berries above medium These grapes will ripen further north than most varieties. Each, 20c; 10 for 51.80; 50 for $8.00.

well formed

grape; very hardy and productive, ripening about the



10 for $1.99; 50 for 57.00. Wyoming—Very productive, healthy and early yielder. Bunches size.

Concord— Large, purplish-black

market grapes.

CONCORD, THE OLD STANDARD, ONE-THIRD SIZE

1866

108

— HOUSE

OF GURNEY, YANKTON,

S.

To Nurserymen

Gooseberries On

D.— 1925 in

Quarantined States

account of the danger of carrying White Pine Blister Rust, all states east of South Dakota are prohibited from shipping gooseberries or currants out of their own state. South Dakota being west of that line and absolutely free from White Pine Blister Rust, w e can ship both currants and gooseberries Bear this in mind in making your into any state in the Union.

are growers of large quantities of numerous varieties of currants and gooseberries, and many nurserymen have availed themselves of the opportunity of sending their orders to us to be shipped direct to their customers^ We use your own billing and shipping tags. are always pleased to give you the benefit

purchases.

of quantity prices.

r

We

We

Plant in good rich soil and give liberal dressing of manure each season. Regular pruning every year is necessary for the production of good fruit. The Gooseberry will do better if partially shaded. Plant them on the north of buildings, fence, or trees We advise mulching the gooseberries heavily, using old rotted straw for the purpose.

Downing Gooseberry — Larger than the Carrie. Will not stand quite as much grief but is an excellent berry for Iowa, South Dakota, Nebraska and Minnesota or in localities where conditions are equally favorable. very productive and profitable variety' 25c each; 10 for $2.25.

A

Oregon Champion Goose-



berry Berries very large, brownish-red color, very sweet and fine for table use and pies. Bush a strong grower, healthy, not verythorny and a very prolific bearer. One of the best berries for the Prices: Each, 25c; market. per 10, $2.25; per 100, $20.00.

HOUGHTON Houghton

—Medium

size,

when thoroughly ripe; very spreading grower, an excellent bearer; the standard Each, 20c; 5 for 90c; 10 for $1.65; 50 for $6.00; 100 for $10.00; 500 for $40.00.

pale Red, sweet

gooseberry, the best for the Northwest.

Carrie Gooseberry Hansen’s report on this Gooseberry at the State Horticultural meeting in 1910: “We have fruited the Carrie the Prof.

reports: “The Carrie is intermediate in size between the Houghton and Downing, and it is a heavy bearer at Brookings. It is a welcome addition to our present short fist of The Carrie will superGooseberries. sede the Houghton, I am confident of that.” Here at Yankton it has proved much the best of all. For size, quality and productiveness we call it best. Each, 25c; 10 for $2.15; 50 for $9.00; 109 for $17.00.

At the meeting of 1911 he further

past season or two and are well pleased with it. It is a great improvement in some respects over the old Houghton. I saw a large plantation near Excelsior, Minn., in 1907, in heavy bearing, and certainly it was a sight to behold.”

CARRIE Raspberries Sunbeam — This new

perfectly hardy Raspberry, introduced by us after another year’s trial, we can say positively that it is the only Red Raspberry of value from the south line of South Dakota to just as far north as you have a mind to go. grow in the nursery a large number of varieties of Red Raspberries. The

S

b

We

ii

ai

Sunbeam was the only one that comes through the winters without winter killing. It produced a full crop of fruit, other varieties not any. A better raspberry than the Sunbeam may be produced, but we doubt it. In hardiness it is perfect, quality the best, and the quantity not to be complained of. Each, 10c; per 10, $1.00; per 100, $4.50; 500 for $12.00. King Pronounced the very best early Red Raspberry by many of the leading horticulturists in Minnesota; it is the great market berry of that country; probably more acreage of the King planted for market purposes than all others combined. 10, 60c; 100, $3.90; 500,

ai

in

ff!

th

re



$15.09. St. Regis Everbearing Red; commences to ripen with earliest and continues on young canes until October. Berries bright crimson, large and sugary. Flesh firm; a good shipper; the. most prolific of any red variety known. Plant a very strong grower. 10 for 80c; 100 ~ 5 for $3.65; 500 for $12.06.

ti

Si

A

ti



sa

be

sta

PROF. N.

E.

HANSEN’fe

NEW HARDY RASPBERRY

Professor Neils E. Hansen’s

We

have left the description of the “Sunbeam" raspberry just as we gave it. We made the statement that the Sunbeam was absolutely the best hardy red raspberry; we also made the statement that possibly a better one would be produced.

We made that statement because we did not feel that Professor Hansen was going to stop the raspberry improvement until he had one that was almost, if not entirely, perfect. We are showing here a photograph of a bowl of the new Ohta. These berries are shown in the photograph about one-half size. We



Gregg Black; for many years the leading standard, known market sort; very productive; large size. 10 for

best 70c;

100, $3.00; 500, $12.00.

Ohta Raspberry

have picked Ohta berries

this year from the times the first ones ripened, early in July, until the ground froze. The Ohta berry is absolutely an everbearing the first year, and if you want continuous berries each season, transplant a few of the Ohta from your patch each fall or spring, cutting the old stock down to about eight or ten inches. The Ohta will add to his good name as an inventor of new fruit. The Ohta outbears the Sunbeam. Each; 20c 5 10; $1.30; 50; $3.00; 100 v $5.00. Per 509; $17.00.

Blackberry.

They make new growth, produced from

cross section of the root, or

the

below the ground on the stalk

that you receive.

Cumberland-Black; a healthy, vigorous grower; fruit Keep and ship as well as any of the blacks. The most profitable market berry. 10, 85c; 50, $2.00; 100, $3.75. very large, quality good.

Royal

Purple Raspberry

—This

an improvement

is

in

hardiness, Size and quality over all other purple berries, equal in hardiness to the best of the reds, a better shipping berry, and has made more money for the growers in this section than any other variety for the past several years. Fruit is borne On account of the remarkable in remarkable quantities. vigor of its canes, it stands drouth and matures full-sized fruits when others are of inferior size and quality. Our supply of this berry is limited, but we think everyone should plant a reasonable number this year. I know you will be well-pleased with the results. Price: per 5, 60c; per 10, $1.00; per 50, $4.00; per 100, $7.00.

Latham — The great A. W. Latham so long

raspberry of Minnesota. Named for Secretary of the Minnesota Horticultural Society. Our experience with this berry has been very satisfactory, nearly as hardy as Ohta, equal in size and a better shipper; quality extra good; color bright red.

Andrew BSue Horse, OgalaEa,

So. Dak.

Apr. 14, 1924.

I am sending you my little boy’s picture. This little boy’s name is Andrew Blue Horse. He plants every summer a little garden and gets a good crop. He grows nice big muskmelons, watermelons and other vegetables, all from your Seed Company every year.

Latham was station.

originated at the Minnesota Fruit Breeding Each, 20c; 10 for $1.50; 50 for $3.00; 100 for $5.00.

Red Raspberries

— Instructions

for

planting

Such as the Sunbeam and Ohta are to be

and

care: handled just, as the

He got first money in Pine Ridge, South Dakota Fair and he wants you to put in your catalog his picture. He wants his dog’s picture with him. He wants the picture put in like that of Wm, Long Wolfe.

no

1866

— HOUSE

OF GURNEY, YANKTON,

S.

D.— 1925

Gurney’s Everbearing Strawberries “Put on your overcoats and pick strawberries enough for a shortcake.,” This was an actual request made by Mrs. S. S. Gurney on October 15, 1920, to her group of girls shown in the picture on this page. Lots of Everbearing Strawberries in the field at that time and there had been a good picking of strawberries right along almost since June, the only skips being at dry time when the berries were too small to pay to pick. will ship strawberries in the fail during October at the regular prices, but do not make replacements on plants shipped in the could not ship them earlier. fall.

We We recommend

We

spring planting only.

Instructions for Planting and Care

We selljjmillions of

Strawberries each year, and they go to all sections of the United States. often ship them across the continent and have them reach destination in perfect condition. Other times they go only a short distance and are dead on arrival. We dig, pack and ship fresh every day, so they leave us in the best possible condition. When you receive your strawberries they should be fresh and green, and not rotted in the crown. It is very unusual to have them reach you in anything but the best condition. When they are received in anything but good condition, notify us at once. More strawberries are killed after they are received by the planter than any other way. They appear to be a trifle dry, and they are immediately soaked up. The crown of a strawberry plant should never be wet before planting. It wall rot in a few hours. Each plant has a number of fine roots; have your ground in excellent condition, force the flat hand into this mellow ground, withdraw the hand, leaving Ja hole an inch by about 4 inches, and about 4 or 5 inches deep. Take the other hand, spread the roots of the plant out fan-shaped, the crown to be just even with the top of the ground when the dirt is packed firmly back against the plant. Plant them from 1 foot to 18 inches apart in the row, and the rows 4 feet apart. During the growing season they will throw out a number of runners that set new plants. Train these to stay close to the original plant, not allowing it to become more than a foot wide. In the fall, when the ground freezes, cover the plant to a depth of about one or two inches with straw or hay. Straw is best, as you can rake it in among the plants in the spring and allow it to remain there. This keeps the

We

OCTOBER fruit off the

ground and

clean always. Strawberries are always sent separate from the balance of

your order, either by parcel post or express, charges

We

paid by us. do this that the plants best possible condition.

may

reach you in

Strawberry Boxes calls from a great many of our customers for strawberry boxes. We have always handled It is in a local way, but never through the catalog. impossible at this time of the year to give you quotations. We look for a much lower price on strawberry boxes and if you can anticipate about what you will need write us and

Each year we have

them

we

will give quotations.

Dunlap Strawberries, Standard Varieties

for all purposes.

JUNE We can furnish you with the Bederwood,

Even with the introduction of the Everbearing Strawberry there is still a place for the old standard one crop per year strawberry. The Dunlap is absolutely the best. It is a self-fertilizer, fine quality berry, yields abundantly, and is a good shipper. We grow a great many varieties of the old standard strawberries, but we consider the Dunlap the best of any Sample and Warfield.

The Dunlap and Bederwood

are the self-fertilizers or perfect flowers. The other varieties are not perfect flowers, but Pistillate and require either the Dunlap or Bederwood planted in alternate rows to fertilize them. Price, 25, 50c; 50, 85c; 100, $1. 25; 500, $4.00; 1,000, $7.50. Parcel post or express charges paid in all cases by us.

Gandy

(Perfect)

is one of the old standard late varieties. Plants very hardy and Berries very large. About, the only variety that produces the best crop the second year after planting. Fine flavored. good shipping variety.

This

thrifty.

A Gibson (Perfect) _

of our best berries. The plant growth is very good. and the berry is excellent for market, of bright color 25 for 50c; 50 for 85c; 100 for $1.25; 500 for $4.00; 1,000

Without doubt one It

is

wonderfully

and holds up

prolific,

well.

for $7.50.

Premier (P) The strawberry without a fault, the earliest of all. While this is the earliest strawberry ever produced, it is so frost resistant in both buds and blossoms that its fruit crop has never been destroyed. This strawberry eliminates crop uncertainty but ripens a week ahead of other varieties. The word “Premier ’’means “first.” This berry is first in size, first in yield, first in quality and first to ripen. The plants are sturdy, healthy and long-rooted which makes them They will thrive in all soil and under conditions that would kill frost resistant. ordinary plants; will yield much bigger crops. It is a long-distance shipper.

Prices; per 25, 50c; 50, 80c; 100, $1.50; 500, $6.50.

Parcel post or express

charges paid.

COOPER (P) If you want to grow something just a little larger and better than your neighbors are growing in strawberries, plant the Cooper. These produce larger fruit than any other strawberry we have seen growing at Yankton. The fruit is of good quality and very productive. Plants are unusually hardy and healthy. These are only a few of its many excellent qualities. 25, 55c; 50, $1.00; 100, $1.70; 500 for $7.50.

e>ujyuvui«.k

COLLINS (P) The king of canners. Deep, rich red color, delicious flavor, firm texture, put in a class by itself. This is a staminate variety which makes it an excellent pollenizer. The fruit ripens slowly so that, two pickings per week is all that is reqraiedr-—Has-arleng-fruiting- season; --TheTruit- is borne on long,

stems. It is exceptionally large and will demand a higher price on account of its size as well aslits quality. The plants are vigorous and productive. Mid-season varietv. 25, 50c; 50, 80c; 100, $1.45; 500, $6.00.

stiff

1866

— HOUSE

OF GURNEY, YANKTON, 's. D.— 1925

111

The Famous Progressive Variety They

fruit from early July until heavy freezing. In our large acreage of strawberries there was no time during the season that we did not have plenty of strawberries for everybody. matter how small or large the piece of ground you have, you can have everbearing strawberries for the better part of four months each year. One hundred plants, properly cared for, and, if possible, placed near the house, where you can give them a little water from the well or some of the wash water about once a week during the hot, dry spells, will supply an ordinary family with all the strawberries they can use during the summer. are receiving letters from all parts of the country, from our customers, telling us how well they like the everbearing strawberries. They produce will

produce

No

We

the same year they are planted. We are publishing a few of these short letters regarding the strawberries on different pages in the catalog. The strawberries are the easiest cared for of almost any of the small fruits, and you will get quicker results from the strawberry than from any other small fruit offered

You

by

us. will notice

on the order sheet a number

of

pamphlets

or little booklets which we issue free of charge, giving you instructions' for the planting of all kinds of fruit, flowers, etc. In this list we give you full information regarding strawberries.

Just check on your order sheet the ones you want and they will be packed with your order. All of these are free.

We are offering the Everbearing strawberry at less than half the price charged by traveling tree agents, and we make shipment of them as soon as they are dug. Last year our sales increased wonderfully over those of the year before. We ship strawberry plants in just two ways, one by parcel post, the other by express. We are quoting these strawberries to you parcel post or express charges paidPlace your order with us early and they will be sent at the proper time.

Express or parcel post charges paid in all cases by us. Always shipped separate from your other orders. Per 10, 40c; 25 for 90c; 50 for Sl.25; 100 for $2=00; 500 for $8,00; 1,000 for $15.00; 5,000 for $72=00=

Gurney’s Dakota Everbearing This remarkable berry commences to ripen fruit with the common varieties and produces a regular steady supply of large berries all summer until it freezes. The trouble with most varieties of everbearing has been their failure to produce more than two crops, one at the time of the ripening of the June bearing sorts and the other late in the season just before freezing weather. In offering this new berry we are pleased

we have overcome this lack of continuous fruit and you may now, where there is .a reasonable supply of moisture, pick large berries in quantities dining the entire growing season. We are offering less than 10,000 of this variety this season. Per 10 plants, 75c; per 25 plants, $1.50; per 50 plants, $2.75; per 100 plants, $5.00. that

Champion No Doubt, The World’s Best Everbearing Strawberry.

We

different

soil

have tested this wonderful strawberry under and weather conditions and have received

nothing but favorable reports regarding its excellence. It seems to be just a little hardier than other everbearing straw-

berries; produces larger fruit of excellent quality.

Champion

We

find

out-yield other everbearing strawberries and produces a continuous crop from July until late in October. Per 10, 50c; 25 for $1.00; 50 for $1=35; 100 for $2=10; 503 for $8=10; 1000 for $15.10=

that the

will

F. E= Adams, Teton County, Montana. June 6, 1924= I am enclosing balance due. I want to thank you for the fine rose bushes you sent. I never saw such nice large roses sent out by anyone and I have purchased many roses from Ohio, Indiana and Montana. Thanks for the extras. All of the roses are growing fine. •

GURNEY, YANKTON,

1866— HOUSE OF

112

S.

D.— 1925

500,000 BLACK WALNUTS AT OUR EVERGREEN NURSERY. LARGE TREES IN THE DISTANCE PRODUCE ANNUALLY LARGE CROP OF NUTS

Nut Bearing Trees Almost every farm and garden contains some land that should be planted to nut trees adapted to the soil. Probably no branch of tree cultivation pays larger profits or is as well assured of a profitable market for all products. The nuts in many cases pay better than farm crops or fruits while most kinds make a growth of valuable timber that will, of itself, pay a large per cent on the investment. The nuts that we list can be grown in almost any section of the country, I will say, with the exception of the chestnut, which should not be planted north of Yankton. Butternut or White Walnut A fine native tree producing a large, longish nut, which is prized for its sweet, oily, nutritious



1 year, each 15c; 10, $1.00; 100, $7.00. Hazel Nut This forms, a small growing bush and produces

kernel.



large quantities of nuts; it is perfectly hardy in any territory; does best if planted alongside of, .or in, thin groves, or along creek banks in the natural timber. Each, 20c; 10, $1.50.



Horse Chestnuts The nuts that these trees were grown from were gathered from two trees that are at least eighteen

inches through and perfect in form, growing in the City of Yankton. These are probably the oldest Horse Chestnut trees in South Dakota and have proved perfectly hardy. The The tree is very beautiful and ornafruit of this is not edible. mental, having an almost perfectly globular crown. It bears large quantities of flowers followed by burrs containing two to four nuts. 4-5 ft., each, $1.50. Walnut, Black This is the black walnut of commerce and produces probably the most valuable of any wood grown in the United States today. It also produces large quantities of nuts which are always marketable at a good price. grow these in immense quantities, having probably over one-half million of them for market this season. All of our walnuts are grown from nuts produced here, so they are the hardiest that 8-12 in., 10, 50c; 100, $1.50; 1,000, $14.00; you can get. 12-18, each, 12c; 10, 60c; per 100, $2.50; 500, $12.00; 4 to 5 ft., each, 40c; 10 for $3.50. Black Walnut Seed should be planted in the fall with the hulls on, about 5 inches deep. Unhulled nuts, 15c per lb.; 10 ibs., $1.00; 20 lbs., $1.80. For fall, 1924, delivery.



We

N. Graves, Foster

IVloore

County,

North

Dakota,

Oct. 20, 1924. I have your letter and

am

pleased to know that you are interested in the Northwest Poplar. We have great con-

lire

fidence in this tree for Dakota prairie conditions. No other It is tree does so well here. the largest Northwest Poplar I know of, measuring 6 ft. 2 in. in circumference, and 2

from the ground. There are several others almost as large, nearly sixtyfeet high. These trees were planted in 1897 or 1898. and w ere about one inch through ft.

tree

12-i

IS-:

T

at that time. is no charge for my measuring these your Miss Ohlhauser has paid the small son who measured these trees, several

There

work

in

trees, as

times over, by sending cancelled foreign stamps. A rare one came this week, to the delight of the boy, who has a

stamp

HOME OF

D, B.

GURNEY-ELM AND HACKBERRY— IN THE SUMMER

collection.

In 1915 you shipped me Butternuts. They killed back the first Winter and are now twelve to fifteen feet high.: Bore six nuts in 1923 and hundreds' this year.

9 3

1866

— HOUSE

OF GURNEY, YANKTON,

D.

S.

— 1925

113

Forest or Shade Trees There are some things that you can get along without, sometimes to your advantage, other times to your disadvantage; and the person who tries to get along without a shade or forest tree is trying to get along without something that works If your home to his disadvantage more than almost anything you could think of. consists of a house and a single city lot, you and your family are entitled to at least If your a few trees that will produce shade, beauty and protection from the winds. home is on the farm you have a greater advantage, and a greater disadvantage if you fail to avail yourself of the opportunity of planting trees. You not only are unfair to your family, but to your buildings and live stock, and to your whole community because a treeless farm is a bad advertisement and reflects on your whole community. If you are part of a municipal organization (and every resident of a town or city is), you are almost criminally negligent if you do not have one or more By being up to date public parks, depending of course on the size of your town. with sidewalks, paving, public parks, etc., you bring it forward ahead of the less progressive community. There are certain natural rules that should be followed in planting street, forest or shade trees to get the best results. First, in planting trees outside of the sidewalk, the trees on every block should be of the same variety and to be just right So often you the trees on both sides of the .street should be of the same variety. see in a single block an assortment of trees, the kind that the owner of each lot may. like best, and the beauty of the entire block or street was spoiled by the conglomeraIn forming a new park in a town or city, the Park Superintendent should tion. have charge of all planting outside of the sidewalk. If he is a good Park SuperinTrees tendent, he will know just what to do and will make the. city beautiful. planted outside, of the sidewalk should be given a good distance one from the other In a forty-four or fifty foot so that they can mature to a perfect beautiful form. Front there should not be to exceed two trees. You often plant as high as six or eight, and within a very few years they are out of shape and you never do have a Forest and shade trees should always have ample room in which beautiful tree. This applies to trees planted inside of the lot and to city parks. The to develop. only place it does not apply is where you want a quick shelter, where certain varieties can be planted together and form a perfect dense windbreak.

ASH TREE AT STATE HOSPITAL

Ash (Fraxinus Americana) This is a slow growing tree but the most valuable of all for northern and northwestern South Dakota and North Dakota. We grow hundreds of thousands of them for that section of the country and they are shipped irv lots of a single tree to a carload. In planting in that section, you should make your planting largely of the Ash. It is an upright grower, with beautiful foliage, perfectly hardy and absolutely the best for the high and dry places, or where a hard pan is close to the top of the ground. It will grow with less rainfall than any other forest tree and will thrive in that part of the country where ninety per cent of the population will say that trees cannot be produced. Every farm in that section can and will produce Ash trees eventually. Just give the Ash a trial and after planting give it good care with cultivation and heavy mulch. Your home, whether it is in the city or on the farm, will be just as beautiful as the tree-covered portion of southeastern South Dakota. This is a great tree for Montana and Colorado, and should be used in all sections of the country in parks to make up a variety. I cannot believe that any of you. care to live in a home, whether in the city or on the farm, unless it has some trees and flowers. You want to plant that which will do best in your locality. The Ash tree is one of the easiest to transplant, it seldom fails to grow, but requires care after planting just as your cornfield does. I advise against the planting of

BOX ELDER (Acer Negundo)

Box Elder This

is a rapid growing tree, producing firewood of gtiod about as quickly as any tree will. Very hardy and longnot a beautiful tree but is desirable in your windbreak )r groves on the farm. We do not advise the planting of these or street trees or in city parks, but intersperse a row of Box When 31der in your grove on the farm for quick protection.

quality

ived

;

is

purpose, cut it down for firewood, and the )ther hardwood trees like the Ash, Hackberry and Elm will nake use of the room previously used by the Box Elder and nake better trees. This photo shows a Box Elder as a shade ;ree. Note its size and shape. Grown with plenty of room. t

has served

its

Each

10

25-

1)-

>-

3 ft 4 ft 5 ft. tran 6 ft. tran 8 ft. tran

5-10 ft. tran L 34-2 in. cal. tran I

i

-3 in. cal. tran -4 in. cal. tran

100

$1.00

12-18 in L8-24 in

$0.20 25 .40 .50 .55

1.25 1.45 2,00

$1.00 2.00 3.50 4.00 5.00 9.00 11.00 18.00

Siberian

2.00 2.50 4.00 12.00 26.00 33.00 40.00

any

tree or

any plant unless you give

it

care,

because if you fail to care -for it, it will die, you will be disappointed and be a knocker. The Ash can be planted much later than the Orders from the North and Northwest are received other varieties. by us later than from other sections, and the Ash fits in on that account also. The caliper referred to on trees means the measurement through the trunk six inches above the ground. 100 1,000 8-12 in $0.75 $4.00 12-18 in 18-24 in 2- 3 ft

1,00 2.00 2.60

Each S0.25

$ 2.00

.35 ,40 .65

2.50 3.50 5.50 11.00 17,00

ft.

8-10 ft. trans in. 134 to 2 to 234 in. 2

14.00 20.00 ......

......

...

cal...

cal..

.

1.25 1.75

$ 14.00 16.00 25.00 40.00 90.00 150.00

Basswood (Linden)

1000

$9.00

10

trans

5- 6 ft. trans 6- 8 ft, trans

4- 5

7.00 11.00 13.00

One

of the most beautiful deciduous trees grown. Trunk straight, the top almost a perfect globe; green leaves

always during the summer changing to bright yellow with the autumn; holds its leaves well beyond most other trees; very hardy. 2-4 ft., 35c each; $3.00 per 10; 4-6 ft., 75c each; $6.50 per 10; 6 to 8 ft,, $1.50 each.

White Birch A graceful tree with white bark; a very desirable lawn tree.. 4-6 ft., $1,00 each; Will stand severe winters if not too dry. $9,00 per 10,

Pea Tree (Caragana Arborescens)

A very hardy, low growing tree from Siberia; excellent for redge purposes, for snow breaks, or ornamental specimens, rhe trees in the spring are covered with racemes of yellow lowers, later forming pods like peas. The bark is light green n color, the foliage light green with silvery back ground. Planted extensively in Canada, North Dakota, South Dakota rnd adjoining states where conditions are severe. Height, 10 feet. Exceptionally good for, dry, cold climates. If you

have had

difficulty in starting windbreaks, groves trees try these, they will give you a start.

Each 6-12 12-18 18-24 2- 3 3- 4

in. in.

,70 ,S0

in.

$9,20

ft.

'

ft.

10 $0,30

.

,25

1,O0 1,59

and other

100 $1,75 3.00 6.00 7.00 9.00

1,000

$13,00

OF GURNEY, YANKTON,

1866— HOUSE

114

D.

S.

— 1925

Cottonwood Dakotas and the tree which we are showing is a very old tree which was more than six feet through at the ba.se. This was a Yankton County product, and on account of its being hollow was appropriated by the bees. It was cut down to get the store Cottonwoods of honey which amounted to several hundred pounds. are not usually hollow, but this one was for more than 70 feet in the trunk and made an ideal bees’ nest. The children shown in the hollow portion of the tree are those of P. S. Gurney.

Grow

to

immense

size in the

you

The Cottonwood and Poplar are the most rapid growing of any of the soft wooded varieties, and should be planted on every farm. They make excellent firewood, mighty good thick shelter, and are always pleasing to the eye. Cottonwood and Poplar are the coming tree for the manufacare selling hundreds of thousands of cuttings ture of paper pulp. paper mill in Dakota and trees to paper manufacturers each season. cut here could reduce the cost of paper. working on cottonwood

We

A

Each

100

1,000

12 to 18 in

$ 0.60

18 to 24 in 2 to 3 ft 3 to 4 ft

.75

$ 4.00 5.00

1,00

6.00

4 to 5 to 6 to

10

$0.5Q

3.50

5

ft

$0.15

1.00

8.00

6

ft

,20

1.50

10.00

8

ft

.35

3.00

25.00



Wild Black Cherry (Prunus Serotina) A hardy rapid grower. Bears The wood ranks next to the Black fruit abundantly when quite young. Walnut in commercial value. Makes a handsome lawn tree. Bears white blossoms in racemes in early spring and ripens an abundant crop of fruit Height, 40 ft. Foliage colors in August. Fruit about the size of a pea. beautifully.

20c 30c 35c 45c

3- 4 ft 4- 5 ft 5- 6 ft 6= 8 ft

each; ten each; ten each; ten each; ten

for $2,00 for 2,50 for 3.00 for 4.00

A COTTONWOOD BEE TREE H, C. Johnson,

Catalpa Speciosa

I

the hardy Catalpa of the north and one that is sold by tree agents over the country as high as $20 per 1,000 for the little fellows. In Yankton County there are some very large growers of the genuine Catalpa Speciosa, and in the city of Yankton there are large trees, some of them two feet through. We procure all of our seed from the trees here in Yankton County. They are fine for ornamental or street purposes and grow very straight and fast. The leaves measure 10 in. across and its beautiful white flowers give it a very tropical appearance. Our large sizes for ornamental purposes are transplanted and are very easily grown.

This

is

Each 12-18 in. 3-4 ft 4-5 ft. tran 5-6 ft. tran 6-8 ft. tran 1

V2-2

2 -2J^ 2 3^-3 3 -4

in. in. in. in.

$0.15

Caliper Caliper Caliper Caliper

.

.

.

.

.35 .45 .50 .85

tran. tran.. tran.. tran.

2.00 2.25 2.50

10 $1.50 3.00 3.50 4. 50 7.00 17,00 20.00 22.50

100 $1.00 11.00 25.00 32.00

bought

I

threshed 2200

.

.

2M

.

[

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

lbs. of

of I

Ottawa Liberty

Hull-less Oats

am very well satisfied with them.

hulled oats from that fifty pounds t

of seed.

i

1

I



Catalpa Bungei Umbrella catalpa grafted on the Catalpa Speciosa from two feet to eight feet from the ground. It makes a perfect umbrella-shaped head without pruning. The various

i

i

(

heights are desirable in landscape or home planting oftentimes places in the grounds where the low fellows, producing the ;

1,000 $7.00

wonderful globular heads, fill in to best advantage; other places where those of a larger size are best. Thisjs a particularly hardy variety and is suitable for any section south of Sioux Falls, S. Dak. 5 ft., $1.65; 6 ft., $1.75 each.

Is a very desirable tree for a great many reasons. The Elm from Northern seed, such as we grow here, is always hardy. It grows into a beautiful spreading tree that will live longer than several generations of people and increase in beauty each year. It is free from diseases and insects, and wind seldom if ever breaks or damages it. From the time you plant it you can say, ‘‘This is a beautiful tree but it will be better next year.” And it continues to get better. I want you to notice again the picture of the monstrous Elm which we show “Down on the Farm.” Here is an Elm tree that has stood more than two hundred Dakota winters. It is large enough for all of the children of a town of five hundred people to play under and all be in the shade. A hundred of them could climb up in its branches without being crowded and everyone of them would enjoy doing it. dozen swings could be attached to its branches and a banquet for two hundred people could be spread under its broad arms. This is the most popular of all street trees. It is planted over a wader range of country for ornamental and shade purposes than any other tree. It is the tree for the city and the town. It is the tree to produce the shade and stand the grief that the shade tree always receives on the farm as well as in the city. Each 10 100 6 in. sd to 12 1.00 $ 12 to 18 in. sd 1.50 18 to 24 in. sd 2.60 $ 0.50 2 to 3 ft. sd .75 3.25 4 to 5 •ft. tran $0.25 1.50 14.00 5 to 6 ft. tran .35 2.70 22.00 6 to 8 ft. tran .60 3.50 32.00 8 to 10 ft. tran .80 7.50 50.00 lj^to 2 in. cal., tran. 1.50 12.00 120.00 2 to in. cal., tran. 2.25 22.00 2 to 3 in. cal., tran. 2.75 25.00 3 to 4 in. cal., tran. 3.50 32.00 ‘4 to 5 in. cal., tran. 5.00 45.00 .

County, Minnesota. pounds

from you last Spring and

Elm, American White (Ulmus Americana)

A

fifty

i

i

I

]

]

1

(

I

I

(

i

I

1

!

j

i

1866

— HOUSE

OF GURNEY, YANKTON,

S.

D.

— 1925

MAIN BUILDING, STATE HOSPITAL, YANKTON, SOUTH DAKOTA, SURROUNDED BY ELMS Hackberry The Hackberry

Each

(Celtis Occidentalis)

a native well into the Dakotas, and there are wonderful specimens of these growing along the rivers, creeks and ravines. It is a perfectly hardy, rapid growing, beautifully shaped tree. When planted alone, allowing it to have plenty of room for spread, it forms into the best-shaped of any of the hardwood trees. It is well to give it considerable room in planting. Heavy winds will not break them. I am showing here the picture of a hackberry tree in front of the telephone office at Yankton, South Dakota. This tree spreads more than 40 feet, is a perfect globe, and is noticed and commented on by practically every visitor to this city. I have, in my own yard, hackberry trees 40 years old These are wonderful trees, nearly two feet through, giving me a dense and perfect shade all summer. The hackberry is very free is

.

from disease iand

insects, a.clean, strong, desirable tree for all purposes. They are hardy as far north as you care to plant. In beautifying the school grounds, the home or the farm; for park or street trees in the town or city, or for a good rugged, centuries-long monument to the boy who lies in France, the

hackberry would be most desirable.

Each 6 4 5 6 8

to 12 inch to 5 feet to 6 feet to 8 feet to 10 feet l^to 2 in. cal 2 to in. cal

2^ 2^to3 in. to 4

3

10 $ 1.00

$0.25

2.00 3.50 4.50 6.50 12.00 15.00 23.00 27.00

.35 .55 .70

1.25 1.75 2.50 3.50

cal

in. cal

LoCllSt,

Black

$

100 4.00 23.00 27.00 40.00 60.00 100.00 145.00 200.00

(Robinia Pseudacacia)

$1.25

LoCUSt,

A

very

fine

Honey tree,

12 to 18 in 5 to 6 ft 6 to 8 ft 1 Y
10

$0.45

$4.00

,65

5.50 15,00

Maple, Silver or Soft

100 $1.25 .

...

(Acer Dasycarpum) This is one of the rapid growing street trees. In towns one and it is of the good shade trees good street trees. If planted in groves in the country it does remarkably well and should be on every farm. Do not confuse this with the silver l'eaved poplar.

$ 3.00

3.75 5.75 8.50 14.00 25.00 30.00

25.00 30.00 45.00 75.00 125.00

Ginnala Maple is



Sugar or Rock SVSaple This tree is chieftain of its clan; straight, spreading, symmetrical, of grand proportions, often 120 feet in height. It grows well and roots deeply. Its bold leaves have very rich autumn tints of clear yellow and scarlet. Hardy here when planted among other

trees.

10 for $1.00; $5.06 per 100 Each, 1.20; per 10, $11.00 5.00 Each, 50c; per 10, 3.50 Each, 40c; per 10,

12-18 in 6-8 ft 4-6 ft 2-4 ft

Mountain Ash fine

An

excellent tree for the

lawn where a larger shade tree cannot be used. 5

Each, $0.60; per Each, .70; per Each, 1.20; per

ft

6 ft

8

ft

Red Oak

very fragrant flowers

1.80

$6.35 .45 .60 1.00 1.50 2.65 3.25

:

10, 10, 10,

$5.75 6.75 10.00

Oak

.

,

.

$9.00

followed with bean-like pods, thorny.

Each

.

a hardy maple from Siberia. A semi-dwarf tree, fourteen to twenty feet tall. Hardier than the Soft Maple. The bright colored prettily cut leaves and the immense quantities of seed that they produce make them very attractive trees. 12 to 18 in., 20c each; 10 for $1.50,

This

$3.00

foliage,

$ 3.09

with clusters of bright red berries.

(Gleditschia Triacanthos)

delicate

100

10

hardy tree, obtains a height of twenty feet. Head dense and upright in growth. Covered from July until winter

rapid growing tree, bears fragrant white flowers, wood very hard, valuable for fence posts, hardy in sheltered locations, or where planted with other trees throughout the east half of the state. Each 10 100 1,000

$0.40

to 18 inch. to 6 ft. trans to 8 ft. trans. to 10 ft. trans 1 Vi to 2 in. cal. tr 2 to 2 Yi in. cal. tr in. cal 24-Yl to 3 35- to 3 Yi in. cal 6-

A

A

18 to 24 in 5 to 6 ft

12 4 6 8

—An

American Variety, rapid in growth. Has large foliage which assumes in the fall a purplish scarlet hue. specimen tree and cannot be too highly recomfine Makes a mended for general planting. 5-6 ft., $1.20 each; per 10, $10.00. 6 to 8 ft., $1.60 each; 3 inch cal., $5.00 each.

Burr ©ak timber.

—Everyone knows

the

Oak and

the value of

Native of Dakota and Minnesota, making very

its

fine

trees.

2 to 3 ft 5 to 6 ft... 2 to 2 X in. cal. to 3 in. cal 2 3 to 314 in. cal 18 to 24 inch

H

A

Each

Per 10

$0.25 1=35 3.00 4=50 6.00 Per 10, 1.00

$2.00 12.00 28.00 42.00 55.00 Per 100, 4,00

1866— HOUSE OF

116

GURNEY, YANKTON,

S.

D.— 1925

Russian Olive Is desirable for a border hedge, windbreak, or large specimen tree. Is generally used for hedges or

windbreak purposes. When used as a hedge, these trees should be planted about 1 foot apart in the row, and after planting cut down None of to one-half their size. these plants should be left with a high if a comtop over 12 inches pact hedge is desired. This will make them branch out close to the

ground and make a

close, perfect

hedge. Trim each season during the best growing period in June to the shape you want your hedge. For windbreak purposes plant them about 3 feet apart in the row, and after several years cut the tops back sufficiently ,Jo make them thicken close to the ground. I

was traveling up through

central South Dakota the other day, up in the treeless region (when I say “treeless region” I mean that three out of the four farms were bare of trees, and the fourth one generally had excellent groves df a number of varieties of trees, proving that every farmer could have the same if he would) and I noticed in a great many places rows, single specimens and groves of the Russian -Olive. This was a considerable time after heavy breezes, w hen all of the other trees were bare It was one of those windy, chilly days, and the of foliage. wind was moaning through the branches of the bare trees. The leaves of the Russian Olive seemed to be equally as fresh as in summertime, and on the south side of the trees around the buildings and along the feeding yards it was quite warm and comfortable. The Russian Olive is one of the hardiest, grows on any kind of soil and under most conditions. It has won its way on its own merits, and I think stands today absolutely first in a hardy dry-weather tree for the Northwest in beauty. When grown for a windbreak it will limb close to the ground, limbs set close together, making a perfect hedge and windbreak, grows as rapidly as most of the willows, and for windbreak purposes it is second only to the evergreen, its beautiful silvery foliage and ebony colored bark make it one of the best T

Barberry Thunbergis

—Hardy,





Red Cedar The photograph shown here w as taken on the grounds of A. Jacobs of George, Iowa. It shows in a very con?7

elusive way what may be. done with, evergreens, including the

Red Cedar, on the farm. You will note the manner in which the' Red Cedars are trimmed, and

it is

one

of the most desirable trees where trimming is required or desired. For the price of Red Cedar and other evergreens, see page 124.

Kentucky Coffee —A perfectly hardy

Tree

medium rapid in growth, attaining a height up to 100 feet. Pods often ten inches long cling to trees throughout the winter. Leaves similar to the Black Walnut. Easily transplanted. 3 to 4 feet, 30c each; $2.50 per 10. tree,

,7 FSSM V, TMt f \

RNSEHMI

a wonderful

tree.

r

6-12 in. 12-18 in ... 18-24 in 2-3 ft 3-4 ft 4-5 ft .

Each

10

.

.

$0.65 $0.15

.80

.20 .40

1,80 3.50

so ; $1.25 2.00 2,65 3.25 8.00 16.00

1000 $14.00 25.00 32.00 45.00

100 $2.00 3.00 4.25 5.00 15.00 30.00

Other Desirable Hedge Plants

low growing, plant from 16 to 20 inches apart. Price: 1 year, $9.00 per 100; two year extra heavy, $22.00 per 100. Buckthorn Perfectly hardy. One of the best hedge plants for general ornamental purposes. Can be trimmed any shape or size desired. Price: 12 to 18 inch, $9.50 per 100: 18 to 24 inch, $13.50 per 100. Caragana Or Siberian Pea Tree, from Siberia, very hardy, covered in early spring with a mass of fragrant yellow blossoms. Stands trimming to any shape. Price: 12 to 18 inch. S3. 00 per 100; 18 to 24 inch, $6.00 per 100; 2 to 3 feet, $7.00 per 100 .



When for single specimen trees for ornamental purposes. isolated for ornamental purposes it makes a very symmetrical, well-shaped tree. In planting your grove plant a row or two of Russian Olives on the north to catch the snows. In the early spring they are covered with the most fragrant flowers that last a good many days; these are followed by quantities of olive shaped seed, silvery white, hanging in It is clusters like the currant through the fall and winter. grown



Honeysuckle (Tartarian) One of the most beautiful, covered in early spring with beautiful pink flowers followed by a mass of crimson and yellow berries that hang on all summer. Hardy, stands trimming. Price: 18 to 24 inch, $12.00 per 100; 2 to 3 ft,, 525.00 per 100.



Spirea Van Houtfei On account of its beauty at bloomit is one of the best a bank of snow white flowers borne on long slender branches in wreath-like form is commonly known as Bridal Wreath. Price: 18 to 24 inch, $15.00 per 100; 2 to 3 ft., $18.00 per 100. ing time







.

1866

— HOUSE

OF GURNEY, YANKTON,

D.— 1925

S.

117

Poplars Lombardy Poplar —A

native of Europe. Remarkable for Valuable in collecfcs erect growth and tall, spire-like form. 4 to 6 ft., 40c each; $3.50 per 10; 6-8 ft., 55c each; ion. 5.00 per 10; 8-10 ft., each, 70c; per 10, $6.50. i/ to 2 in. cal. each, $1.10; 10 for $10.00. 2 Bolieana Poplar A very compact upright grower with Hardiest lossy leaves green above and silvery underneath. 4 to 6 ft., 60c each; per 10, $5.50. f the upright poplars. Northwest Poplar This is the hardiest of the Poplars. l very close relative to the Cottonwood but somewhat slower d growth, much hardier and is a very valuable addition to he list of forest and shade trees offered by us. If you have >een unable to grow the Elm, Poplar and Cottonwood trees ry the Northwest Poplar and you will be successful. 3 to 4 ft., ach, 25c; $1.25 per 19; $12.00 per 100; $30.00 for 500. to 3 ft., 10 for $1.00; 100 for $5.00; 500 for $20.00. Carrington, N. D., May 12, 1920, Some time ago you wrote asking that I write something diich you could use in your catalog referring to the NorthI submit the following: In our great Northwest, west Poplar. ature has been very generous to us in providing a land, great a expanse, rich in soil, ready for the plow and home, but She saw the coming of man and performed a miracle, reeless. iving him the opportunity and responsibility of planting rees about his buildings just as he might wish them to be acated, giving comfort and cheer to all arid a real home to is family. Near Carrington, N. Dale., nature crossed two ative trees, taking the better parts and omitting the objecionable features of both, and created a new tree, bigger, etter and more handsome than either parent, especially suited the Northwest Poplars. Blossom but 3 our climatic needs o not seed, grow fast into a beautiful symmetrical tree of In a test, covering many ense shade and smooth bark. ears, of 15 varieties of poplar, the Northwest has proven its reat superiority over all in growth and hardiness. Trees of 5 years show, an average growth of an inch in diameter and wo feet in height each year, and are just in their prime. W. F. MOORE.





j



Carolina and Norway Poplar We grow thousands of each year, and they are known as the “Sudden Saw A one-year-old tree, grown from a cutting, has been known to grow 12 feet high in one season. No other tree will these,

Log.”

produce this growth. They are very hardy, and, unlike the cottonwood, never bear cotton seed. Either variety, Price: 2 3 4 5 6

to 3 to 4 to 5 to 6 to 8 8 to 10

ft

.

.

10

$0.50 1.00 1.50 3.Q0 4.00

.20 .25 .35 .50

ft ft ft

ft

100 $3.00 4.00 6.00 10.00 28.00 32.00

1,000

$20.00 35.00 40.00



Silver-Leaved Poplar This is another of the native poplars that should be more generally planted. It will make cordwood faster than a cottonwood. 4 to 5 ft Each, 35c; $3.00 per 10 5 to 6 ft Each, 45c; 4.00 per 10 6 to 8 ft...,. Each, 55c; 5.00 per 10



Thorn Apple This is a native ornamental tree, perfectly hardy covered in spring with dainty white fragrant blossoms, followed by scarlet fruit that hangs on well into the winter. This fruit is edible. The tree often reaches a height of 20 2-3 ft., each, 30c; 10 for $2.50.

feet.

Sawyer, Wabasha County, Minn. IViay 7, 1924. Received Order No. 3406 today. The Weeping Mulberry with its large, fine head came through in good shape. It is certainly a fine tree. Also, received the premium Honeysuckle and Rock Maple. The whole order was satisfactory and packed in fine

J. E.



The Beauty and Value

Each $0.15

ft

shape.

of the Ordinary Willows

cold, blustery morning that Mrs. Gurney and I drove The hoggery is ut to the hoggery just after the sun came up. >cated on the highest point of all our land, and the nursery stretches It

was a

to the north and west from it. As we passed over the point Gurney called attention to the beautiful colorings of the are trees in their various places in the nursery, and we could pick ut the rows of willows and the varieties even from that distance ie Diamond Willow by the grayish line running across the long elds; the white or fence willow by its darker colors; the Laurel eaved by its dark green, upright growing, sturdy limbs; the Russian rolden by its long, waving lines of red and gold; the American iolden by its strictly yellow color; and the little Ural by its grizzly

way

my

Irs.

ray.

We

were then tempted to go down among them and tramped than three-quarters of a mile through the willows and other and realized more of their value than at other times. As >on as we were down among the trees the bright sunshine seemed ) have raised the temperature, and the trees had broken the cold tore

•ees,

ind.

Have you a windbreak, one our family

and your

stock,

that will protect your buildings,

and at the same time beautify your

lace?



Diamond Willow Very valuable for fence posts, growing produces posts that will keep in the ground for years, ou should plant a good grove of them. The richer the ground le more rapidly they will produce posts, but they do well even on igh and dry ground. ipidly,



Niobe Weeping Willow See Weeping Trees. Russian Golden Very beautiful, rapid grower. Does well low locations. Grows more rapidly than the ordinary willow, he twigs of the Russian Golden are yellow until winter, when they lrn a showy red. Half an acre of these trees cut to the ground /ery few yepxs will keep an ordinary family in fu$L American Golden Similar to the Russian Golden, but no



i



oubt hardier. Excellent for windbreak purposes. The shiny yellow ranches in winter make a valuable addition to any collection of ees. Will make large trees when planted alone. Laurel Leaf This is a beautiful medium height tree with



leathery foliage, especially good ornamental tree, as well one of the most valuable of all willows for windbreaks, firewood, ;c. They do well on high dry ground, and will stand drought. Its leathery glossy foliage makes it one of the most beautiful the willows and the fact that it thrives on higher and dryer places lossy, 3

(

F

Grows rapidly, prolan other willows makes it more desirable. ucing a good tight wind break or snow catcher about as quickly s any tree you could plant.

3-YEAR-OLD GOLDEN WILLOW Each

•iamond Willow, 18-24 inch seedlings. aurel Leaf, 2-3 ft aurel Leaf, 18 to 24 inch

merican Golden, 3 to 4 merican Golden, 2 to 3 ussian Golden, 2-3 ft .us-sian Golden, 3-4 ft

ft ft.

Per 10

HEDGE

Per 100

Per 1,000

1,00

$ 7=00

1866

lis

— HOUSE

OF GURNEY, YANKTON,

S.

D.

— 1925

Weeping Trees of any of the trees. Can be used i impossible to use the larger, erect growing kino effective landscape work you must always use somethin

The most ornamental places where

and

fcfr

in this

-

it is

line.

Weeping Mulberry



Will stand where not exposed to heay a most beautiful tree with its long, lithe pendants sweepin winds; the ground. This is especially valuable to plant on lawns wher you do not wish to obstruct the view from the windows to th streets or roads. It produces an umbrella-shaped head, never growing above eight or ten feet high, and spreading out in beautifu glossy, dark green leaves and purple fruit, makes one of the mos sought-after of all the weeping trees. Each, $2.25; headed, abou 6 ft. high. is

Niobe Weeping Willow This is the grandest and one of the hardiest and best of all c the weeping trees. It is a very rapid growler and will grow on almos any quality of ground. We are showing here photograph of a tre in the William Edmunds grounds at Yankton. This tree has bee: planted about five years and with the lightest breeze the whole tre The bark of the tree is golden yellow, the undersid. is in motion. of the leaves silver, and the top of the leaves a glossy dark green The new shoots often grow to a length of sis or eight feet and woulc not be half as large around as an ordinary lead pencil. This is specially valuable tree for hedges, single specimen and cemeteries The price is so low you can afford to buy lots of them. 3 to 4 ft, 35c each; $3.20 per 10; 4 to 6 ft., 50c each;$4.5C per 10; 6 to 8 ft. 75c each; $7.00 per 10. :



Cut Leaf Weeping Birch An upright growing tree, witl This is, no doubt, the most beautiful -o ornamental trees. Too well known to need additional description These trees should be protected with our tree-protectors at time o planting and given a thorough cultivation until they are wrell estab lished. They are not difficult to grow. 3 to 4 ft., each, $1.2S 4 to 5 ft., $1.70 each. slender drooping branches. all

Mrs. John Rose, Harrington, S. Dak.

Enclosed find a picture of my little girl. I want you to put your seed catalog, as I buy all of my seeds from you. I want the people around here to see it as they did not have any garden and my garden was fine; all from your seed. it

in

all of

My little girl’s

name

is

Ellen Rose.

She loves

flowers.

Yours

truly for a big seed order next year.

Can You Grow Trees on Your Farm? A man

from northwestern South Dakota

in the office yesterday and remarked on the beautiful trees around Yankton. He also remarked that it was impossible to grow trees in his section of the country. I had just received a letter from his home town, enclosing a photograph of evergreens and forest trees purchased from us many years ago, that had made a beautiful grove and windbreak. I showed him this letter and photograph and he said: “ Oh yes, I know that man well. He can grow trees, he takes care of them.” This is the solution of tree-growing anywhere. Take care of them and any farm in any part of the country will produce trees of some kind.

was

.

CUTTINGS A

great many varieties of trees and plants can be propagated from cuttings readily than any other way for a less expense. Cuttings of all kinds should be planted as soon as received, and we do not advise the shoving of them into the ground as is ordinarily practiced; they wall be more or less calloused when you receive them and shoving them into the ground destroys this callous and kills the

more

If you have a quantity of them the best way is to plow a deep furrow, put them against the overturned furrow where the horses will not step on them as you come with the next, and throw a furrow against them, tramping them carefully after planting. The way practiced in the nurseries and where you want to do it just right is with the dibble, making a hole in the ground the length of the cutting, dropping the cutting into it and pressing the dirt firmly around it. If these directions are followed you will have almost perfect success. Leave one-half inch of the cutting above the ground. 100 1,000 Cottonwood .$0.45 $3.00 .50 3.00 Carolina Poplar .50 3.00 Norway Poplar. 3.25 L. L. Willow .50

cutting.

.

.

.

A

BEAUTIFUL DRIVE IN BON

HOMME

COUNTY, SOUTH DAKOTA ARCHED WITH SHADE TREES

American Golden Willow Russian Golden Willow. White Willow Diamond Willow

.

.

.

.

.45 .45 .60 .53

2.75 2.75 4.00 3.53

.

1866

— HOUSE

.

OF GURNEY, YANKTON,

S.

D.

— 1925

119

Hedge Plants The demand

for good hedge plants has increased rapidly each season, especially in the older communities where they have disthe various unsightly fences surrounding and dividing of posed the properties. There are so many places that hedge plants can be used, not only for beauty but for usefulness as well. shall name a few of the plants to be used for special purposes. For the rear of the town lots the Lilacs, Honeysuckles, Russian Olives, Mulberries and Buckthorn may be used. For dividing the properties, Spirea Van Houttei. The Barberry Thunbergii and Buckthorn are excellent along either side of a drive. The other hedges offered by us may be used in many places. The variety of hedge to use depends greatly upon conditions and For the north where weather conditions are very locations.

We

severe plant the following extensively; Buckthorn, Caragana, (Russian Olives, Tartarian Honeysuckles and Lilacs.

The following hedges stand severe trimming, Buckthorn, Barberry, Caragana, A moor River Privet, Russian Olives and Mulberries. The Tartarian Honeysuckle stands a reasonable amount of trimming. Would not advise trimming the Lilacs or Spirea Van Houttei. In the following list of hedge plants you will find at least one any purpose. Do not fail to write us for special A hedge of the Barberry Thunbergii or Japanese Barberry along the lot line in front and along the lot line if you are on a corner lends a distinctiveness to your place that is suitable for

information.

appreciated

by

all.

Barberry Thunbergii or Japanese Barberry Perfectly hardy, will make a dense hedge from three to four feet high that will always remain symmetrical with out pruning. However, it may be pruned to almost any form. It bears large nearly round crimson berries which remain on nearly all winter. The foliage colors beautifully in autumn. It is perfectly safe to plant this Barberry as it has no connection with the rust that affects other Barberry and the grain. It is an

excellent ornamental plant, 16 to 20 inches apart.

Each 7-10 10-15 12-18 18-24

Seedlings Seedlings.

.

.

.

.

Trans Trans

25c 35c

and extensively used. 10 $0.90 1.25 2.25 3.00

Plant

50

100

$ 3.25 5.00 8.00 12,00

$ 6.00 9.00

15.00 22.00

Buckthorn Perfectly hardy and very ornamental. Makes fine ornamental hedges. Can be trimmed to any desired shape. Plant 9 inches 6-12 inch, $3.50 per 50; $6.76 per 100; 12-18 inch, $1.00 apart. per 10; $5.00 per 50; $9.50 per 100; 18-24 inch, $1.50 per 10; $7.00 per 50; $13.50 per 100; 2-3 ft., $1.75 per 10; $8.00 per 50; $15.00 per 100; 3-4 ft,, $2.00 per 10, $9.00 per 50; $17.00. per 100.

Caragana (Siberian Pea Tree) The

hardiest ornamental hedge plant known.

Planted extensively Canada, North Dakota and Montana where conditions are severe. This plant also does well where conditions are more favorable. Will stand pruning, and may be pruned to two and one-half or three feet, or will make a hedge much taller. Plant 8 inches apart. 12-18 inch, 70c per 10; $3.00 per 100; 18-24 inch, 90c per 10; $6.00 per 100; 2-3 ft., 20c each; $1.09 per 10; $7.00 per 100. in

J. B. KENDRICK’S HOME SHERIDAN, WYOMING

SENATOR

Mulberry (Russian)

Honeysuckle (Tartarian or Tree) An excellent specimen of hedge plant. Should be planted 18 inches apart. Their fragrant blossoms in the spring and mass of bright berries make them worth while. They may be pruned as low as three feet or will make a hedge or screen eight to ten feet high if left unpruned. 50 100 Each 10 18 to 24 in 2 to 3 ft 3 to 4 ft 4 to 5 ft

$0.25 .35

45 .55

$1.90 2.80 3.60 4.30

$ 9.00 12.00 15.00 19.00

$17.00 23.00 28.00 35.00

Lilacs The Lilacs in the purple and white are also easily cared for, and as a screen there is nothing better that grows the same height. It will not stand the trimming the other plants do, The Lilac is too but is used a great deal for hedge purposes. well known and its value too well known to need description here.

Planted extensively for ornamental hedge purposes. They stand hot dry weather exceptionally well, and will stand severe pruning. Would advise the hardier hedge plants for north of Plant 12 inches apart. 12-18 inch, $1.50 central Nebraska. per 100; $11,00 per 1,000; 18-24 inch, $2.00 per 100; $14.00 per 1,000; 2-3 ft., 20c each; $1.00 per 10; $4.00 per 100.

Privet Hardy

(Amoor River North)

Yankton.

Foliage glossy green, holds its color fall. Will stand shearing to any extent. This a strictly first class ornamental hedge plant and should be planted extensively in localities where they are hardy. Plant 10 inches apart. 18-24 inch, 15c each; $6.50 per 50; $12.00 per 100; 12-18 inch, 10 for $1,10; 50 for $5.00; 100 for $9.50; 2-3 ft., 516.59 per 100. at

well into late

is

Russian Olive Will make an excellent ornamental hedge, can be pruned and Perfectly hardy and is becoming held to three and one-half feet tall. It seems to adapt itself to almost irery popular as a hedge plant. my condition whether hot or cold. Plant 12 inches apart. 50 100 $2.00 $1.25 6 to 12 in. 2.00 3.00 L2 to 18 in. 4.25 2.65 L8 to 24 in. $0.65 3.25 5.00 2 to 3 ft. .85 .

Spirea

A

Van Houttei

of the graceful Spirea Van Houttei dividing two properbeautiful during the entire season, first with its glossy leaves, Followed by the beautiful sprays of white flowers, then by the gentle swaying of its long slender branches and dark green foliage, makes it truly the most beautiful hedge for that purpose. It never grows high enough to be called a “Spite” fence but is enjoyed equally by those on both sides. It is often planted and cared fo* in partnership. 18-24 inch, $1.75 per 19: Does not reauire trimming. $7.50 per 50; 2-3 ft:, 10 for S2.00; 50 for 516.90.

hedge

ties is

VAN HOUTTEI 1 YEAR AFTER PLANTING

18 66

120

— HOUSE

OF GURNEY, YANKTON,

S.

D.—=1925

EVERGREENS FROM AND FOR THE DAKOTAS AND THE NORTHWEST In traveling over the Dakotas we occasionally see an Oasis in the shape of Evergreens .clustered around a farm house, or a few in the door yards in the cities and villages, in every case doing well, a “joy forever,” and a protecIn Turner County, South Dakota, tion from the winds. are some grand old Pine Trees that have stood for the last thirty years, growing better each year. On adjoining farms owners tell us evergreens will not grow in Dakota; they will not even believe what they have seen for thirty The facts are, an evergreen is at home in the years. Dakotas, is as easily transplanted as any forest tree, and is worth much more than any other forest tree when

growing on your place. Here, in Yankton, we realized the great future for evergreens in the Northwest, and have planted hundreds We know the of thousands of them at our nurseries. varieties that will doNbest in all parts of the country and are prepared to give you the information, and furnish you with the trees, fresh dug and properly packed. In buying evergreens do not buy one or half a dozen unless you have room for no more; buy them by the hundreds and thousands; they are the cheapest and best windbreak, shutting out the winter winds as no other trees will. They are cheap; will cost you but a few dollars for enough to enclose your feeding yards and buildings. Two rows of evergreens properly arranged will shut out the wind better than six rows of other trees. This is especially true in winter when the windbreak is needed

'

.

•.

,

most.

The Evergreens we

are listing are handled properly

Many carefully as Evergreens can be handled. of the smaller companies are offering the same trees

and as

much higher prices. We are growing and selling more evergreens than all the other nurseries in the Dakotas and we are able to make much lower prices than With the new those who only sell a few each season. buildings we have added we are able to dig and pack immediately, which insures fresh trees in all cases. at

Gao. Zimbelman, Fullerton, North Dakota. I am sending you one of the largest of my Bugless Potatoes that I raised from your seed. I raised about thirty bushels from % bushel. I planted them the first of June. It was very dry here last summer. I sure was surprised when we dug them. I am very much pleased

COLORADO BLUE SPRUCE Note the beauty of having the branches begin at the bottom. Never remove the lower branches.

with the Bugless Potatoes. They are the best potatoes I ever raised and know they cannot be beat.

A SPOT IN THE PARK AT THE EVERGREEN NURSERY— ALL PLANTED BY COL.



Arbor Vitae A well known evergreen, when planted in a partially protected spot,

C.

W.

GURNEY

the type that makes it easily and safely transplanted, either as a balled and burlapped tree Grows very dense or “naked” as termed in the nursery.

system

excellent for screens, growls very compact, easily transplanted. (This is a flat leaved or branched evergreen.) Specially desifable for all points south, east or northeast of. Yankton. This would mean Nebraska, Iowa and

growth.

Minnesota. Arbor Vitae stands trimming better than any other evergreen which makes it very desirable for hedges and wind breaks in all that part of the country adapted to its

Similar to the common Arbor Vitae but very upright in growth. Used extensively in landscape planting and in evergreen groupings. Very ornamental.

and

Its root

is of

fairly rapid.

Pyramidal Arbor Vitae



Black Hills Spruce (PICEA CANADENSIS) (See colored photo page 128) Dark green, perfectly hardy, very compact, the best for general planting. It is superior to any as a windbreak. Easily transplanted. A native of western South Dakota. The Black Hills Spruce on account of its natural environments is the only spruce hardy enough for the wind-swept bare prairie country of the northwest. It grows hardily on all

and on account of its close growing branches and close set foliage it is one of the best for ornamental

soils

heavy

purposes, stands trimming well, medium rapid growth. This makes the closest and consequently best windbreak, holding its dark green color all winter, gives you the touch of spring to come The Iowa farmer has. discovered their value both for windbreak, ornamental and boosting the price of his farm. They come to us year after year and take them away in carload The average loss in transplanting where care is taken lots. seldom reaches 2 per cent.

,

1866

— HOUSE

OF GURNEY, YANKTON,

S.

D.

— 1925

121

EXTRA SELECT COLORADO BLUE SPRUCE AT OUR EVERGREEN NURSERY Colorado Blue Spruce (Picea Pungens) Scotch Pine (Pinus Sylvestris) (See colored photo page 128.) s

Out in the high places in Colorado, where the soil is not good as it might be, where the summers are very hot and

be winters very cold, grows a sturdy evergreen known as This is undoubtedly the most be Colorado Blue Spruce. eautiful of any or all of the evergreens and has come into se surprisingly rapid in the last few years for ornamental It has adapted itself to all conditions and the urposes. The trees etter the conditions the more rapid the growth. ary in color from light green to beautiful blues, the price arying with the color the light green ones the cheapest,



nd the brightest blue the highest price. We are [showing a ihotograph here of thousands of them in our Evergreen Jursery. Perfectly hardy.

For all practical purposes for 50 years the Scotch Pine is We are listing very satisfactory for groves and windbreaks.

Remember, all these sizes to plant in large quantities. This forces all evergreens are transplanted several times. the roots to form in a compact mass directly below the trunk. When you get an evergreen from us you get all the roots. In about 1885, father planted a quantity of Scotch Pine on our grounds at Concord, Neb. These trees are now large enough for saw-logs, and would make mighty good lumber. You see big fellows of the Scotch Pine all over the country and it shows what they are worth to you. Plant some this year and then again next. You will not regret it. good

Blue Select Specimens About 5 to 7 per cent of the Pungens will be blue, Their value depends on 'heir colors, lore or less. nd it is practically impossible to list them correctly. l 2 to 3-foot tree is worth from $1.25 plain to $6.00 or a fancy tree. I have seen a fancy 5-foot tree sell for 25.00. Send me the amount you want to invest in a hie tree and give size, and we will make the selection nd give you full value for your money. (

S

Roster’s Blue Spruce KostedaSa) A variety of grafted Blue Spruce that is widely mown and admired

for its beautiful symmetrical form bright, steely blue color, which changes to a azzling silver when exposed to sunlight. The Kosfters are all reproduced from one original due Spruce bluer than any other, one that holds its olor on the old needles as well as its most wonderful teely, glistening, dewy bltie of the fresh new growth The price of the Koster is necessarily i the spring. igher than other evergreens as they are grafted and vergreens .are very hard to graft, but the Koster well epays the small extra cost with its elegant beauty. 'hese are specially valuable as single specimen plants r used in groups in landscape work.

nd

fV *0/

f ROM

THE

\

\

MOUNTAIN PINE MUGHO

Dwarf Mountain

or

Mugho

Pine

Dwarf, leaves short and stiff, thickly distributed over the branches. Does not grow tall but spreads over the ground, assuming a globular irm. Very dense. Used for slopes, hedges and at the corners of entrances. This Pinus Mughus is one of the extremely hardy, easily transplanted, wer growing evergreen shrubs desirable in your grounds. It spreads out i the ground rather than up in the air, is of a beautiful green color, ;ry compact and also a very slow grower, insuring compactness of rm always. Pinus Mughus is hardy anywhere that you can grow any ee and is a desirable ornamental plant in hundreds of places on ly well-kept grounds.

From

P, J, Rasmussen* Hiendale* N- Dak, Some time ago you asked me to send you a picture of toy beautiful Blue Spruce, so here they are, I bought them of you as seedlings ten years ago. They measure from six to ten feet high. I have over 200 of

them and you can

see they are beautiful trees.

1866— HOUSE OF

122

GURNEY, YANKTON,

S.

D.— 1925 Bull Pine (Pinus Ponderosa) This is the genuir Black Hills Pine. 1 requires little moistun .

)

Will thrive in high, dr places. Hardy way u to Canada, where it

:

extensively planted.

Bull Pine is place on many lists as the bes on account of its hard ness", rapid growth, an its heavy, long silve gray needles. Whethe or

not

it

is

best,

!

w

know it is mighty goo and we are proud of thi tree and the many she ter belts we have mad with it on thousands c N orthwest farms. Ge the habit of plantin evergreens. They groi

rapidly and "Drifting

snow

easilj will no

break the branches.

WILLIAM LONG WOLF AND FAMILY OF THE OGALALAS Took more premiums

at

South Dakota State Fair than any other person.

All

from Gurney Seed.

The

Bull Pine Colored Photos on Page 128 I saw Bull Pine growing in many states this last summer were taken on our own grounds on Thanksgiving Day. Snow growing wild, just as nature intended they should grow, on the ground and nearly zero weather, this does not affect But as you look at a single specimen on the Bull Pine. saw the little fellows but a few inches high and those thre this half-mile hedge or windbreak you realize the value and foot through, tall and straight as an arrow, I saw them growSired in the Black ing on the low places along the creeks and rivers and sa\ beauty of this most remarkable tree. millions of them growing on the tops of the mountains am Hills of the Dakotas, bending to the wintry blasts, but holding its footing, sometimes growing from a crevice in a rock at an altitude of over 8,000 feet, one tree just this side o where there is but little soil and eventually splitting the rock Salt Lake City, at the highest point on the Lincoln Highway growing out of the top of an immense boulder. This tre with its roots; growing faster than an Elm tree, retaining is over thirty feet high, vigorous and straight; probably a smal its heavy long green needles all winter and making a perfect crevice in the rock had caught a seed and some dust, a littl snow break or shelter belt. moisture and then the little tree which became so strong tha This child of the Dakotas, the giant of Evergreens, proit split the rock and stands today a sentinel on this the highes duces the best quality lumber nearly as soon as a Cottonwood. point across the continent on the Lincoln Highway. Whei In our nurseries we have long rows of these, rows a half you drive that way, as I know you will, stop and shake one o mile long and four feet apart. Trees from 12 to 18 and 18 to its boughs and congratulate it. I know it will be glad to mee 24 inches high, transplanted at least twice, which insures the you. root growth that make Gurney Evergreens so sure to grow Because this tree is growing on a rock, it is no sign they d. when transplanted. When we pack your order they are dug Balled and burlapped or best there. They will grow on a rock, but they will grow fresh from our own grounds. mudded immediately and started to you grown, dug and blamed sight better if you give them the best place and thi :

packed right.

best cultivation

Plant a

A

Row Around

the Country School Acre

grand trees around the school acre would mark your school as the most beautiful and progressive in its community, besides furnishing that most desirable protection from wintry winds. The school grounds of the whole country are generally bare a school house, a few unsightly out-buildings, the wild grass knee high, with a path from several directions leading to the school house door, and from there to the other buildings. Possibly this acre is surrounded by a fence; if so, it is generally in a dilapidated condition. Is this the kind of surroundings that our children, the men and women of tomorrow, should have when they are getting the education that fits them for citizenship and the future management of our government? Could there be a better

row

of these

_



way

to teach

them patriotism and love

of country

and the

you have.

love of light, than the proper planting of their school grounc with beautiful trees and shrubs, the naming of each of thes< trees for a soldier who had given his life in the greatest caus< or for the soldier who had offered his life in the same cause Let the County Superintendent and the teacher of eacl district take this matter up with their school board, presen it to them in the right fight, secure the authority and plan these trees with the proper patriotic ceremonies. Let th< succeeding County Superintendents and school teachers cal the attention of their pupils to these “living monuments” jusi as regularly and religiously as the child is taught any othei branch. Let them show the pupils the danger their country has just passed through by a portion of our inhabitants noi

becoming true Americans.

Jack Pine (Pinus Banksiana) A

very rapid grower and very hardy. Will thrive in poor Very desirable as a windbreak. soil. Jack Pine grows nearly as fast as the cottonwood, and gives you better service This, in my opinion, is the most desirable of all evergreens for quick windbreaks; easily transplanted, growing in any kind of soil; holds its color and foliage all winter, making an excellent windbreak or shelter belt almost or sandy

from the first year. Buy them not only in hundred lots bui buy and plant thousands of them. They will increase the value and usefulness of your, land many times their cost, Douglas Fir—Rapid growing fir tree hardy in the vicinity 0f Yankton when planted with other trees. Ornamental anc valued on account of its rapid growth,

Warranted Evergreens Balled and Burlapped from the soil the ball of earth is covered tightly with burlap grow and sell more evergreens twice over than all other and then the trees are packed and shipped to you. Do noi growers and salesmen, in the Dakotas. It is our business to disturb this ball of earth; leave the burlap on, and plant il know how to grow-, handle and ship, and we are advising you that way. We have often shipped a car load containing 60( to spend a little additional money and buy your trees balled to 1,000 trees and the purchaser reported a total loss of less and burlapped. The method of balling and burlapping is to than 2 per cent, take a ball of earth large enough so that all of the fine roots This tree, are saved and in the dirt in which they grew. All the money you spend for evergreens is a good with the ball of earth, is taken up very carefully to avoid investment. Immediately on taking it breaking or -disturbing the soil.

We

_

Smoot, Lyman County, S. D. Jan. 29, 1924. I am enclosing a fist of names of people who would like very much to receive your catalog. Three years ago, we bought Bull Pine from you and they seemed to grow by magic. We nothing stops them. We have a good grove started and they are doing well. This past Fall I have taken first prize at the Lyman County Fair with my Waneta Plums. Irvin C.

five

on the high Uplands, but

186b— HOUSE OF GURNEY,

.

YANKTON,

S.

D.— 1925

123

Notice to Evergreen Purchasers

Special

listing evergreen without ball of earth on roots, those that are bailed and burlapped not guaranteed, and those All of these evergreens will be balled and burlapped guaranteed. dug, packed and shipped as ordered, which will insure fresh trees in all cases. The balled and burlapped guaranteed trees and those not guaranteed are handled in the same manner and packed from the same lot. The roots of evergreens not balled and burlapped are muddied as soon as dug from the ground and will reach you in good condition. In all cases the balled and burlapped evergreen are dug with the original dirt on them; the roots are not disturbed, which practically insures growth.

Below we are

Our Guarantee on Guaranteed Evergreens We

warrant them to grow, and

if

one

to grow and we are August fifteen, 1925,

fails

notified at any time after July first and before we will refund the purchase price, or furnish charge for same.

another tree without

Directions for Planting Evergreens In planting balled and burlapped evergreens do not remove Dig a hole much larger than the burlap, but plant as received. the ball, place the tree in the hole, see that the ball is well watered, fill in around it with top dirt and tamp thoroughly. Plant the tree so that about two inches of dirt is over the top of the ball. Where the ball of dirt is tied on with heavy twine the twine should be cut as soon as the ball is placed in the hole.

BURLAPPED IN EARTH

No. of

Size 8-12 in. 12-18 in. 18-24 in. 24-30 in. 30-36 in.

for car load prices.

3- 4

4- 5

4-

Extra special prices in large lots.

Scotch Pine.

.

Dwarf Mt. Pine

Amer. Arbor Vitae

Red Cedar,

ft.

ft.



.

.

Foster Blue Spruce.

Pyramidal Arbor Vitae.

.

8-12 12-18 18-24 2- 3

ft.

3- 4

;;

.75 1.00 1.50 1.80 2.15 2.65 3.20

7,00 9.00 14.00 17.00 20.00 25.00 30.00

60.00 70.00 105.00 145.00

9.00 12.00 17.00 21.00 26.00 36.00 42.00

75,00 85.00 150,00

6 7 7

1.00 1.25 1.80 2.25 2.75 3.75 4.50

2 3 3 4

.35 .45 .70 .80

3.00 4.00 6.50 7.25

23.50 32.00 46.00 52.50

2 2

.35 .45 .50

2.75 3.70 4.25

.25 .35 .45 .60 .85

2.00 2.75 3.70 5.00 8.00

1

ft.

2 2 3 3

12-18 in 2- 3 ft. 3- 4 ft.

2 4 4

8-12 18-24 12-18

2 4 4

12-18 18-24 2- 3 3- 4

in. in, in. in. in. ft.

ft.

.18-24 in. 24-30 in. 20-36 in. .18-24

in.

-

105.00 130.00

1.25 1.55 1.75 2.20

3

in. in. in.

$ 39.00 45.00 65.00 90.00

40.00 47.00 85.00 100.00 125.00 145.00

6/

ft.

$ 4.50 5,50 7.00 9.50 11.00 13.59 4.50 5.50 9.00 12.00 14.50 16.50 20.00

.50 ,60 ,90

3 4 5

in. in. in. in. in.

.12-18 in. 18-24 in. 2- 3 ft.

.

1,00 1.25 1.45

5 5 6 6

12-18 in. 18-24 in. 2- 3 ft. 3- 4 ft.

Bull Pine.

Jack Pine.

5

,60 ,80

4

ft.

8-12 12-18 18-24 24-30 30-36 3- 4 4- 5

.

3 3 4 4

3 4

in. in.

in. in. in.

or Burlapped

Packed Carefully Each 10 100 $ 0.50

3 4 5 6 6 7 7

ft.

8-12 12-18 18-24 24-30 30-36 3- 4

.

Not Balled

2

‘5

ft.

8-12 in. 12-18 in. 18-24 in. 24-30 in. 30-36 in. 3- 4 ft.

Colo. Blue Spruce.

Colo. Blue, Extra Select. (See Page 132)

times Transplanted

2

2 3 3 4

5

5.50 8.50 12.50 16.50 19.50 22.00 27.00

45.00 67.00 115.00 135.00 165.00 190.00

1.45 2.00 2.40 2.80 3.40 4.00

8.00 12.09 17.50 20,50 25.00 30.50 35.00

1.20 1.70 2,30 2.85 3.60 4.80 5.80 .60 .75

Guaranteed

Each $ 1.00

1.35 1.65 2.00 2.35 2.70

10 $ 7.15 11.05 13.65 17.50 20.00 23.75

58.50 87.10 149.50 168.75 206.25 237.50

65.00 90.00 135.00 180.00

1,20 1.85 2,60 2.95 3.50 4.20 5.00

10,40 15.60 22.75 25.65 31.25 38.10 45.00

84.50 117.00 175.50 225.00

10.00 15.00 20.50 25,50 31.00 42.50 54 , 0 ®

75.00 105.00 180.00

1.55 2.20 2.95 3.55 4.50 6.60

13.00 19,50 26.15 31.90 39.75 55.85

97.50 136.50 234.00

5.00 6.50 9.50 10.70

43.00 54.00 72.00 82.00

.80

1.05 1.25

1.00 1.30 1.65

6.50 8.45 11.90 12.90

55.90 75.20 100.00 120.00

25.00 35.00 40.00

,60 .75 .85

4.75 6.20 7,25

43.00 55.00 62.00

1.00 1=05

6.20 8.05 9.05

55.90 71.50 77.50

18.00 26.00 35.00 43.00

.45 .60 .75 .90

32.00 44.00 55,00 65,00

4.55 6.20 8.05 9.25 14.00

41.60 47.20 71.50

1.10

3.50 4.75 6.20 7.20 10.00

2.55 3.50 5.00

22.00 28.00 45.00

.95

,80

,60 ,80

1.00 1.25 1.50

.45 .65 .55

3.50 5.50 5.00

1.25 8.65

5.55 10.00 8.00

.50 ,60

4.50 5,50 7.50 8,00

,75 ,85

1.05 1.35

6.50 8.00 10.00 13,00

1.00 1.25 1,60 1,90

8.45 11.00 14.00 18.00

3.90 5.35 5,95

35.00 50.00 55.00

4,65 7,50 8,10

45.00 70.00 80,00

2,20

20,00

2.80

27,00

.90

32,00

4

Are

Solid 5

122.50 156.25 181.25 218.75

7.15 11.05 16.25 20.60 24.40 27.50 35.00

.95

2.00 3.50 3.00

3,50 4.10 4,70

100 $ 61.10 84.50

1.35 1.80 2.30 2.70 3.10 3=70

.75

1,05 1.49 1.85 2.20 2.50 3.00

.25 .40 .35

.,80

All Evergreens

Balled and Burlapped Balled and Burlapped Each 100 10 $ 0.75 $ 47.00 $ 5.50 1.05 65.00 8.50 1.30 10.50 95.09 125.00 1.60 14.00 1.90 145.00 16.00 175.00 2.20 19.00

at 10 Rates , 50'at 100 Rates .

.60

Ornamental and Flowering Shrubs



The Altheas are among the most hardy shrubs on account of late blooming, which is from August to October, a period when but few shrubs are in flower. They are also used as hedge plants, for which they are admirably adapted. Alba plena Double white, crimson center. Duchesse de Brabant Double dark red. Totus Albus Fine, single, pure white. 60c each. Set of 3 varieties, $1.50. Flowering Almond (Amygdaiws^ A flowering shrub two to, four feet high, of branching habit, blossoms very early in the spring- With, a little winter protection these stand the severe winters of North Dakota nicely. We can furnish them either in the white or pink. 2-3 ft., each, 70c; 5 for $3.00. Bechtel’s Dbl. FI. Crab (Pyrus Augustifolia) This is a sport of the Iowa Wild Crab. Too much cannot be said of this extremely hardy wonderful flowering crab. The blossoms are of a clear, rich pink, double and similar in appearance to a rose. It is not unusual for the two-year-old trees to blossom in the Dogwood Red Osier (Cornus Sfolonifera) Growing 6 to Althea (Rose of Sharon)

nursery the older trees are entirely covered with these beauti50c each; 5 for $2.20. Crandall Currants This is a large graceful ornamental shrub which produces fragrant yellow flowers and large quantities of large black currants. 1 This is both ornamental and useEach, 35c; per 5, $1.50. ful. The Everblooming Butterfly Bush This shrub, from a, young plant set out either in the spring or fall, will mature tot full size the first summer, producing a handsome bush, which often attains a height of four feet the first year. It produces long, graceful stems, which terminate in tapering panicles of beautiful lilac-colored flowers that are of miniature size and: borne by the hundreds on a flower head which is frequently 10 inches long. A single plant the first season will throw out as many as 50 flower spikes. 3 ft., 40c each; 10 for $3.5Q. Siberian Dogwood (Cornus Alba Siberica) An upright shrub having bright red branches. Its rather long leaves are pale underneath. Flowers are creamy white, in flat-topped clusters; fruit a light blue or white. 3 to 4 ft., 40c each; $2.50 per 19. 2-3 ft., each, 30c; $2. GO for 10. 10 feet tall, forms a small, handsome tree; its clusters of small, white flowers in early summer are very dainty, and its bark of dark red in winter; bears in early fall a profusion of purplish berries. 2-3 ft., 25c each; per 10 , $ 2 . 00 . valuable of our

tall,

— —

;

ful blossoms.















Deutzia Valuable shrubs of different heights, but having the same habit of bloom; a dainty bell or tassel-shaped flower borne thickly in wreaths along their branches in May. Useful in landscape work for massing. Gracilis Dwarf growing, dense bushy, its drooping branches wneathed in pure white flowers in May. Also valuable for winter blooming in pots. 12-18 in., 35c each; per 10, $3.00. Deutzia, Pride of Rochester —Has very large panicles of double white 'flowers. White when fully opened but a striking pink when in bud. A very upright, growler. Blooms late in June. These do especially well when planted on the east side of a house or partly protected by trees or other shrubs. 2-3 ft., each, 35c; per 10, $3.00. '



Barberry Berberis (See Hedge Plants) Do

not confuse the Thunberg’s barberry with the

common purple and green barberry. It is perfectly safe to plant this barberry as it has no connection are not with the rust that destroys small grain. offering the common barberry on that account. See picture in hedge plants. Thunberg’s Barberry This might well be called the most valuable of the low-growing shrubs. It will stand pruning in any form; masses well in any situation; is very attractive and showy during the whole season, and is particularly beautiful in the fall, and; one of its best qualities is that it is effective during the entire winter, as it has beautiful, red berries, which combine well with winter landscapes or with the dark, Makes an excellent hedge foliage of evergreens. plant, and is' extensively used.

We



Each

BECHTEL’S DOUBLE

FLOWERING CRAB AT HOME OF JEFF MATHEWSON, TRIPP,

S.

D.

7-10 10-15 12-18 18-24

Seedlings Seedlings

Trans Trans

25c 35c

10

50

$.90

$ 3.25

1.25 2.25 3.00

5.00 8.00 12.09

100

$6,00 ’

9.00 13.00 22,00

BUTTERFLY BUSH

— 1866— HOUSE OF GURNEY,

YANKTON,

S.

D.— 1925

'

Elderberry

— (Sambucus)

These beautiful shrubs are not half The cut leaved elder tppreciated. >ears large clusters of fragrant white lowers, turning to clusters of red. Then iluish-black edible berries are borne in 'mmense quantities, bending the plant intil they resemble weeping trees. The eaves are large and resemble fern Plant them liberally. Excel-

jronds.

or specimen plants. Elderberry, Makes a )ush six feet high, foliage bright green, dossoms in June and July with delicate vhite fragrant flowers in dense masses, ollowed by black edible berries much An orna>rized for wine and pastry. nental plant throughout the season, rhey may be used as a Jiedge. Should >e planted two to three feet apart. !-3 ft. Each, 25c; per 10, $2.00; per ;o, $9.oo. fent for. grouping

Common—

Cutleaf Elder (Sambucus Lacin-



Grows 6 to 8 feet high with oliage that is almost fern-like. Droopng habit. They make a beautiful creen, are very ornamental at all easons of the year. Include at least a sw of these in your order. 2-3 ft., 25c ach; per 10, $2.00. ata)



A very striking shrub, similar to the American Elder, only that the a very bright yellow. Can be trimmed to a small, ompact shrub. 2-3 ft., 25c each; per 10, $2.00; 3-4 ft., 40c ach; per 10, $3.50. Forsythia (Golden Bell) Few, if any, of the spring flowerig hardy shrubs can surpass this slender and brilliant flowering Golden Elder (Sambucus Aurea)

to 10 feet high

Mage

;

is



shrub. It is upright growth; foliage rich, dark green; flowers brilliant golden yellow which open in very early spring before the shrub leafs out. 2-3 ft., 35c each; 10 for $2.80.

Weeping Forsythia (Suspensa Forsythia)— Similar to the Golden Bell, but has drooping branches. The flowers are golden One of the most showy shrubs in cultivation. 2-3 ft., each, 50c; per 10, $4.90,

yellow, very showy.

Lilacs All Lilacs listed are perfectly hardy, very ornamental both hen in bloom and throughout the entire season. By purtiasing

a number of the

ishioned Lilacs, :ast

one month.

you

named

will

varieties, as well as the oldextend the period of blooming at



Common Purple Is perfectly hardy, makes a dense rowth from 6 to 10 feet high, flowers fragrant; is often used >r hedge purposes. 2 to 3 ft., 25c each; $2.00 per 10; to 4 ft., 35c each; $2.50 per 10. Common White Same as Purple, except that it has pure hite blossoms. Same price as Purple. 2 to 3 ft. 3 to 4 ft. Persian Purple Lilac—-6 to 8 feet high, with slender upright ranches, foliage rich green; blossoms in late spring with pale lac colored flowers. Very fragrant. 2-3 ft„, 55c each; $4.00



;

.

er 10.



Josikaea Dark shiny leaves, purple flowers in June after ther lilacs are gone. Unusually good and should be added to our collection. 2-3 ft., 90c each; 5 for $2.50.



Jacques Callot. S. Very large panicles of rosy pink flowers; the individual flowers nusually large. 2-3 ft., 90c. Vestal. S. Enormous trusses of large-sized owers, of perfect shape, with reflexed lobes; pure hite; the finest flowered sort, 2-3 ft., 90c. slicate



Congo

— Wine

ecially fine.

hite Lilacs

red,

very attractive.

Es-

HEDGE TARTARIAN HONEYSUCKLE S. DEPT. OF AGRICULTURE, Sitka, Alaska. 1200 apple grafts, neatly packed in a box, just arrived by last mail.

From U.

grafts are in excellent condition.

you like the common purple and you will not make a mistake by If

Iding this to your collection. ach; $6.00 per 10.

2-3

ft.,

65c



Heine Jarry Desloges Panicles very large, owers of perfect form, double a blue shade of ire beauty. One of the best. 18-24 inch, 65c ach; per 5, $3.00.

Snowball

Common

Snowball (Viburnum

Sterilis) lardy, attains a height of 3 to 10 feet. Is filled ith white balls of bloom in the last part of May. to 3 feet, 50c each; $4.50 per 10.

Highbush Cranberry (Viburnum Opulus) -8 to 10 feet. Handsome, dense, brilliant, green )liage, a rich setting of large bunches of crimson erries which enliven the late summer and relain on bare branches into the winter. 2 to 3 ft., Oc each; $4.50 per 10. Viburnum Lantana 10 to 15 feet. Beautill wrinkled, Lantana-like leaves; white, flowered l May and June. Fruits color unequally from rimson to black, causing a most charming comination of colors throughout the summer. Good r shady locations. 2 to 3 ft., 40c each; 3.50 per 10.





SNOWBALL. THE OLD-FASHIONED

GROWING MONTANA

KIND. IN

Viburnum Dentatum Upright bushy shrub obtaining a eight of 15 feet. This shrub is a native in parts of Minnesota; xeeptionally hardy. Similar in appearance to the Viburnum .ant.ana. Flowers are borne in cymes 2 to 3 inches broad; ruit bluish black. 2 to 3 ft., 41c each; $3.59 per 19.

The

126

1866— HOUSE OF GURNEY,

YANKTON,

S.

D.

— 1925

Honeysuckle Albert’s

Honeysuckle

(Lonicera Alberti) half-weeping shrub from Siberia, pinkish blue blossoms, very fragrant; fall berries. Extremely hardy. 2 year, 25c each; $2.15 for 10.

A new dwarf,

Morrow’s Honeysuckle (Lonicera Morrowi)

A medium sized honeysuckle, having widespread branches; leaves a downy gray underneath; flowers white, changing to yellow; berries bright red. 2 to 3 ft., 35c each; per 10, $2.50. 3 to 4 ft., 40c each; $3.00 for 10. Tartarian or Upright Honeysuckle Of all the hedge and specimen plants offered in the catalog I like the Tartarian or Upright Honeysuckle as well as or better than others. I like it for a great many reasons: Its hardiness, its rapid growth, its immense number of beautiful star shaped pink and white flowers coming early in May and lasting for some little time. These flowers are followed by/ an immense crop of beautiful red berries that last*nearly all summer. The berries are not edible. Its glossy, leathery foliage comes very early in the spring ahead of other hedge plants and lasts well into the fall. Its grayish-white w ood is beautiful at all seasons of the year. Its ability to stand heavy trimming and cutting back, makes it one of the most desirable for hedge purposes. Its upright pyramidal growth makes it one of the most beautiful specimen plants. Its fragrance fills the air for long distances when in bloom. Its adaptability to all conditions, and its quick recovery of growth after transplanting. It is hardy in any portion of the United States and well into Canada. In planting Tartarian Honeysuckles for hedge purposes, they should be planted 18 inches apart in a row, and will stand trimming equally as well as the other hedge plants. For hedge purposes we have a very beautiful lot of plants. T

Each 18 to 24 in 2 to 3 ft 3 to 4 ft 4 to 5 ft

$0.25 .35 .45 .55

10 $1.90 2.80 3.60 4.30

50

$9.00 12.00 15.00 19.00

100 $17.00 23.00 28.00 35.00

Hydrangea Arborescence (Snowball Hydrangea)

—This

magnificent, perfectly hardy American shrub has snow-white blossoms of largest size. One of its most

CAN BE TRIMMED TO A SMALL, COMPACT SHRUB

valuable characteristics is its coming into bloom just after the passing of all early spring-blooming shrubs, flowering from early June until late July. This does better planted in partially shadv places. 2-3 ft., 50c each ; per 10, $4.00; 18-24 inch, 35c each ; $2.80 for 10.

THE BEAUTIFUL HYDRANGEA. USED LARGELY IN LANDSCAPE WORK



Hydrangea (Paniculata Grandiflora) This familiar one of the most common factors during August, September and October in brightening up the lawm. Without this included in our shrub planting, we would have but few flowers at that time. The flowers open up on the first of August and it is not unusual for them to last well into the winter. Many of the blossoms later in the season show a very pronounced coloring of pink. These may be grown in tree form or cut back and grown into very dense bushes. Their massive white plumes

* shrub is

borne on long stems will attract attention. They are sure to produce flowers each season. We had flowers this year in our nursery measuring better than 12 inches long and 9k£ inches through. These seem ’to be perfectly hardy here at Yankton and in the North, where they have plenty of snow to cover them. In the open country where you do not have shrubs and buildings to protect them, they should have a winter protection 13-24 in., each, 40c; per 5, of 'dirt or straw and manure. $1,9?; 2-3 ft., 55c esch; mr 1% $4,50=

I

j

,

DELAWARE

mmsrnrn^ mm

kfe Each, 25c. 5 10 25 I -A $1.25 $2.00 $4.50 ^ £ -

BETA Each 30c. 5 L

25

10 25 $2 25 $5 00

NIAGARA 5 95c.

Each, 20c . 10 25 $1.80 $3.90

LUTIE

m

Each, 30c. 25* 5 10 $1.30 $2.50 $5.00

W

UUNUUKD, Each

.:r£r

,

20c.

10 25 80c. $1.00 $2.30 5

BLACK

h LLb I

A

native of South Dakota, hardiFoliage dark est of all spruce. Second best green, very compact. for

single

specimen

ornamental

<

superior to any evergreen' for dense windbreak and dense, lowgrowing hedge. Stands trimming.

planting

mi"

,

iflg

as

BO

SI.

an

act

Te 10, I

fra

»

I

fi

SI

In



COLORADO

It

,

BLUE SPRUCE

s?

A

native of Colo-

This

is

the

most beautiful

for

rado.

k

i

a

ornamental and landscape ng,

and

its

plant-

ti

?!

silvery

blue foliage in sum-

E

mer, changing to a

more blue

winter

being the

II

pronounced insures

best.

A

S

its

very s

hardy evergreen.

f

a 3

s

BULL PINE (Pinus Ponderosa) Each

10

100

t0

}£ in. 35c $3.00 $23 00 lo 18 to 45c 4 0Q 32 00

^4

in.

°

70c 6.50 45.00

|[°

80c 7.25 51.00

||t

THIS

ROW ONE-HALF MILE

LONG, 25 TO 35 FEET HIGH

I point of the United States. It will thrive in high, dry places in any shelter belt on account of growing on solid rock at 7,000 feet elevation. It is absolutely the best for branches. heavy, lomg, silver-gray needles. Drifting snow will not break the its hardiness, rapid growth and its list page. price evergreen see prices, evergreen For On account of the low price, you should plant hundreds of these.

This

is

the genuine Black Hills Pine.

have seen

it

,

—— 1866

— HOUSE

OF GURNEY, YANKTON,

S.

D,— 1925

129

Syringa (Philadelphus) Syringa or iViock Orange (P. coronarius) See picture Hardy, free flower-



.

ing shrub, with showy, fragrant white flowers; grows 8 to 10 feet high. One of the most popular shrubs. 2 to 3 feet, 40c each; $1.80 per 5. Golden fVEocfc Orange (Philadelphus coronarius aurea) Valuable for landscape effects on account of its yellow foliage and dwarf habit. Very free flowering. 12 to 18 in., each, 35c; per 10, $3.30.





PhcladeEphtss GraradifJora Large white flowers, fragrant, very rapid grower, hardy. 2 to 3 ft., each, 35c; 5 for $1.50; 3 to 4 ft., each, 45c; 5 for $2.00. P. IWft. Blanc consider this aSsuperior variety of the Syringa. The flowers. are very large, pure white and very fragrant, almost covering the bush. This variety is hardier .than other varieties. This makes a very fine graceful shrub and can be used as an ornamental hedge. 2 to 3 ft., 35c each; per 10, $3.00;>18 to 24 in., each, 25c; 10 for $2.00. Lemoine Syringa Erect growing shrub with small fine foliage and creamy white flowers in June. An exceptionally fine variety. Height, 6 to 8 feet. 2 to 3 ft., 35c each; per 10, $3.00.

— We



Spireas Anthony Waterer

— Makes

from spring till late in the each; $2.53 per 10<

fall

a bush 18 to 24 inches high, covered with large heads of crimson flowers. 30c



Biilardi 5 to 7 feet high, upright with spikes of rich pink flowers from July on. This is an exceptionally hardy strong growing Spirea, good for the north. 2 to 3 ft., 30c each; $1.25 per 5. Spirea collosa alba Height 24 inches. Covered with white blossoms from spring until fall; very vigorous and attractive. Excellent for grouping with other shrubs or for foundation plantings. They can safely be planted under windows, etc., on account of their height. This plant may be cut to within two inches of the ground in the fall and will come up and blossom each season. 18 to 24 in., each, 25c; per 19, $2.00; 2 to 3 ft., 30c each; 10 for $2.75. Collosa rubra Similar to the abSVe, covered with red flowers. The leaves have a slightly purple cast when young. 18 to 24 in., each, 30c; per 10, $2.50. Golden Spirea A rapid growing variety 8 to 10 feet high, with masses of snowy white flowers drooping the branches with their weight; young foliage bright yellow, changing to golden bronze in fall. 2 to 3 ft., 35c each; $3.00 per 10. 3-4, 40c each; $3.50 per 10. Spirea Vanhoutfei One of the most popular shrubs especially in the cold Northwest. Few shrubs retain their attractive foliage throughout the year as well as this sort. In spring, or about Memorial Day, the hedge is a perfect fountain of pure white bloom. Perfectly hardy, 18 to 24 in,, 20c each; 10 for $1.75. 2 to 3 ft., 25c each; $2.00 per 10. 3 to 4 ft., 35c each; $3.00 per 10. Thunbergii Forms a dense feathery bush 3 to 5 feet. Foliage changes to bright scarlet shades in autumn. 18 to 24 in., 25c each; $2.00 per 10. 2 to 3 ft., 30c each; 10 for $2.50. Prunifolia Similar to Van Houttei; more upright in growth. Flowers small double white. Hardy in southern part of South Dakota and under similar conditions when planted with other shrubs or trees. 2 to 3 ft., 50c each; $4.50 per 10. ^ SorbifoGia (Ash leaved Spirea) One of the earliest shrubs to come into leaf and flower in the spring. Long spikes of white flow ers in June and July. Leaves similar to the Mountain Ash. Entirely hardy. 2 to 3 ft., 30c each; 5 for $1.25.



— —





(



r

One

of the Lessons of Nature

is,

“Plant in masses; have an abundance.” Don’t be stingy. Why not treat ourselves to a little enjoyment? Copy Nature on a small scale if you cannot on a large one. When Providence knocks on your door bringing a profusion of gifts, don’t insult Him by picking out a flower or two and neglecting the rest. He deals in abundance. How often you find this opulent word attached to His gifts? • By Rev. C. S. Harrison, in “The Holiness of Beauty.’’



Spirea Van Houttei Hedge and Flower. This picture shows the Spirea hedge plants together with a young lady. Charles was considerably interested in this young lady in 1921, but they are married now; it shows the wonderful growth

produced by this Spirea, commonly known as Bridal Wreath. I have these in several places around my house, and this hedge 150 feet long north of the house » regular snowbank at bloom-



ing time.

#

186 6

130

— HOUSE

OF GURNEY, YANKTON,

S.

D.

— 1925

Sumac

Snowberry

are planted extensively on account of the bright colored leaves and the red berries that hang in bunches on We are offering the tops of them throughout the winter. only perfectly hardy varieties.

Snowberry (Symphoricarpos racemosus) A valuable medium-sized shrub, branching near the ground. Has small

The Sumac

Fern-Leaved

(Rhus glabra Var

laciniata)

—A

beautiful

low variety, with leaves of very large size, deeply cut and drooping gracefully from the branches. 3-4 ft., each 35c; per 5, $1.50; 2 to 3 ft., 30c each; $1.30 for 5. Sumac (Rhus Eloba) Tall growing shrub, reaching 12 to 15 feet. It is perfectly hardy and its clusters of small red fruit, with its bright foliage in autumn make it very desirable. 2 to 3 ft., 25c each; $1.00 per 5. (Rhus Typhina Var laciniata)— Fernleaf Staghorn Rapid, robust grower, produces cones of bright red fruit. Leaves beautifully formed, rivaling the most delicate fern. For massing with other shrubs the effect is striking. Can be cut to the ground each season and a mass of beautiful foliage In the fall the leaves turn to the most beautiful will result. pinkish red, a large group of them is a wonderful sight. 2-3 ft., 35c each; 5 for $1.50. Sumac Staghorn Similar to the above but not fern leaved. Somewhat taller growing. 3 to 4 ft., each 35c; 10 for $2.95; 4 to 5 ft., each 45c; 10 for $3.85.





pinkish flowers, with large,

Very odd and

Sumac

his is a native shrub, exceptionally hardy and valued on account of its bright colored leaves that do not know of any shrub hang on well into the fall. that the leaves color up so beautifully in late summer and fall as the Sumac. 2 to 3 ft., 30c each; per 5, $1.25.

We

Roses

— Instructions

berries in the fall. used in all groupings.

attractive. Should be 25c each; $1.00 per 5. Coral Berry or Indian Berry (Symphoricarpos vulgaris) Same as above, except that it has purplish red berries, which hang on during the winter. Fine in groups with Snowberry or for wild groups. 2 to 3 ft., 30c each; $1.25 per 5.

2 to 3

ft.,

Wahoo or Fire Bush (Euonymus Americana) a native shrub of South Dakota. Hardy in any part and should be extensively planted. Height 8 foot. A very ornamental and showy small tree, its chief beauty consists in its brilliant berries, which hang in clusters from the branches till midwinter; berries rose color. 2 to 3 ft., 30c each;^$1.20 per 5; 3 to 4 ft., 35c each; $1.50 per 5. This

is

of the State



(Common) —

waxy white

Weigela (Rosea) Hardy south

Nebraska without winter protection. of that point it should be protected thru the winter. Beautiful shrubs that bloom in May, June and July. The flowers are produced in such great profusion as to almost entirely hide the foliage. They are very desirable for the border or for grouping and as specimen plants for the lawn. 2 to 3 ft., 40c each; $1.75 per 5. of central

North

for Planting

and Care

Of any of the flowering shrubs. These are most in demand and there is more innecessary grief than other shrubs because the purchaser will not follow intructions. I want you to get down to brass tacks with me, and listen to, and ollow these instructions. Then you will have the real results, and you will hrow us a bouquet of “words” that we will appreciate. Hybrid Perpetual, Hybrid Tea Roses and most everblooming varieties of oses, produce all flowers on new wood, consequently there is no advantage in aving all of the old wood. It is left on as a handle. When you receive the rose, dig a hole in good soil, amply deep to receive the oots in their natural position; deep enough so that the plant will be l}/i inches leeper than it was in the nursery. Put the top soil back and pack well in among he roots. See that it is thoroughly packed. Firm it well with your feet. Then Then with the hands draw the •ut the top back to within 5 in. of the ground. >arth up around the top, leaving only the tips of the branches sticking out. Uter a week or ten days, rake this mound of earth down level and you will ind a new growth coming out nicely, and the old wood plump and green. These instructions apply to all roses, climbing, as well, except that climbing oses produce flowers on old wood. Consequently after the first year you want jlut on Hybrid roses cut back ;o save as much of the old wood as possible,

AMERICAN BEAUTY, Where Situation

— Good roses

possible sheltered shrubs.

may

Grow Roses

to

be grown in any open sunny position,

from north winds, and

Preparation of the Beds fertile,

H. P.

sach spring to within seven inches of the ground md you will be surprised at the beauty and quantity of flowers produced.

clear of all roots of trees

if

and

—Roses

well-drained ground.

It is

wall grow and give good returns in any worth while however, to use some care

in the preparation of the beds, as the general health of the plants, and increased quantity andquality of bloom, more than repay you for the extra care expended. The best soil for roses is the top soil from an old pasture and Dig out the bed to a depth of 18 inches or more, well rotted cow manure. Fill in with a and, if drainage is imperfect, it must be provided for. mixture of soil and. manure as above. It is best to make the bed sometime in advance of planting to allow time for settling. After the soil is settled it should be about an inch below the level of the adjacent surface. to five feet wide, so that you can Make the beds not over

3^

flowers without stepping

Winter Protection

on the bed.

— Most

all roses should be protected in this latitudehave found that the most satisfactory protection is to draw up a of soil from eight to ten inches high around the base of the plant, then cover the entire beds after the ground begins to freeze with any loose material, such as strawy manure, corn stalks, and in more severe climates a heavier covering. This is all that is required. Climbing roses are not all hardy enough to be left on the trellis, but should be taken down, laid flat on the ground, covered with either hay straw, or earth, and placed back on the trellis early in the spring. It is necessary to save as much wood as possible in order to have flowers throughout the summer.

We

mound

GEN. JACQUEMINOT,

H. P.

Miscellaneous Roses All roses offered by us are heavy field grown two years old. Manda’s Triumph Pure white, many double will produce This fragrance is noticeable a considerable distance leaves. in clusters of from 10 to 12 on small side shoots, literally coverfrom the rose and is delightful. Each, 35c; 5 for $1.50. ing the plant and standing well above the foliage. Each, 35c; Harrison’s Yellow Semi-double, bright yellow; showy, per 5, $1.25. hardy and fine; blooms very early; one of the best of its color. Each 75c; per 5, $3.00. Sweet Brier Rose This is the true English Sweet Brier or Eglantine. The single pink flowers are quite artistic but it is Persian Yellow Deep golden-yellow, semi-double; very valued most on account of the refreshing fragrance of its Two-year heavy, each, 75c; per 5, $3.00. fine, hardy.









1

— HOUSE OF GURNEY, YANKTON,

866

Hybrid Perpetual Roses grown. This is a

field

S.

D.

— 1925

131



All roses offered by us are 2 vear, extra heavy Each, 60c; 5 for $2.60; 10 for $4.55.

-class of the hardier perpetuals or everblooming roses, as a rule the flowers running larger than the Hybrid Teas. You cannot make a mistake in purchasing either the Hybrid Perpetuals or the Hybrid Teas. If given proper winter protection they are hardy anywhere in South Dakota. American Beauty (H. P.) Generally conceded to be the most grandly beautiful of roses in size, form and color. Rich red, passing to crimson, very delicately veined and shaded and surpassingly fragrant. Captain Hayward (Bennett, 1893) (H. P.) Bright scarlet, very vivid in Summer and glowing in Autumn. Large, full, and bold, the outer petals finely reflexed, while the center petals stand up well, making a flower of striking beauty. Clio (W. Paul, 1894) (H. P.) A vigorous grower producing handsome foliage; large globular flowers of flesh color shaded to the center with rosypink. Similar to Margaret Dickson.

Frau Karl Druschki, White American Beauty or Snow Queen (P. Lambert, 1901) (H. P.) Snow white; flowers extremely large, yet beautiBlooms six inches broad are not uncommon. Growth is strong _

fully formed.

and vigorous, with abundant foliage. It is one of the very best bloomers in this division. Superb. Blooms until frost. See front cover, No. 9. George Arends Hybrid Perpetual. Very vigorous grower, extremely hardy and one of the most satisfactory of the Hardy Hybrid Perpetual class.



The

color

is

a delicate rose, deliciously frgrant.



Gloire Lyonnaise White tinted yellow, large, full, and of good shape; very free, distinct and pleasing. The nearest yellow of any of the Hybrid Perpetuals.

Very

fragrant.

General Jacqueminot

—Brilliant

scarlet crimson,

an old favorite and

one of the best known roses in cultivation. Does well everywhere. Mrs. John Laing Soft pink of beautiful form, exceedingly fragrant and free flowering. Stands very close to the top among fine roses.

PAUL NEYRON, H. P.

Magna Charta — A

general favorite, prized on account of its strong, upright foliage, as well as for its magnificent bloom. The beautiful bright pink, suffused with carmine. Plantieir (Plantier, 1835) (H. P.) Extremely hardy, completely hides itself in June with its lovely pure white, sweet-scented flowers; a free and continuous bloomer. See front <>ov«r, No. 8. Prince Camille de Rohan One of the darkest colored roses; very dark, velvety crimson changing to intense maroon; a very prolific bloomer; the flowers are of excellent form and size. The best dark red. Ulrich Brunner Cherry red, a truly magnificent rose. The color is bright and beautiful. The stems are long, raising the large, perfectly formed flowers well above the foliage. Thrives to perfection under our conditions and certainly

growth and bright, healthy color

is



Madam





should be included in every collection. Red Radiance Produces large flowers throughout the most unfavorable hot summer weather, in color a clear, cerise-red, a most valuable addition to our list of roses. See front cover, No. 7. Paul Neyron— One of the finest hardy roses ever grown. It blooms unceasingly from June to November, on uniformly long, stiff, thornless stems, with immense cup-shaped flowers 4 to G inches across. Color is bright ruddy pink. See front



cover, No. 10.

T



.) Salmon flesh shaded rose with chamois center. rose that is lovely at every stage. The buds and flowers are beautifully formed colored, enhanced by rich veining on the petals. Stems are long and carry flowers erect. See front cover, No. 11.

Ophelia (Paul, 1912) (H.

A

and

Augusta Victoria—White shading

Hybrid Tea Roses Hybrid Tea or Ever-Blooming Roses

— Each, 69c; 5 for

$2.60; 10 for $4.55. The Hybrid Teas are a class of everblooming roses. They produc'e'wbnderful shades of roses continually from June until freezing. For best results Hybrid Tea roses should be severely pruned. All roses offered. 2 year extra heavy. Columbia (Hill, .1918) (H.T.)— Peach-blow pink, deepening as it opens to, a glowing and enduring color, resembling a perfect Shawyer rather .than the, other. parent, Ophelia. A large rose with long,' stiff stems, nearly thornless; absolutely free from mildew and an- easy doer. J. B. Clarke (H. Dickson, 1905) (H. T.)— Intense scarlet, shaded .crimson-maroon; very dark and rich, and sweetly fragrant; petals large, deep and smooth; extremely high pointed center; foliage bronzy-green changing to dark green; growth strong and upright, making a large, handsome bush. (



.

Mme.

to primrose, a fine rose very vigorous, producing flowers throughout the garden. in every This should be season. Killamey Brilliant A rich glowing shade of rosy-carmine buds long and pointed, petals of great substance. A truly magnificent rose. Jonkheer J. L. Mock Flowers are produced with great freedom on long stiff stems, are large and of perfect form, of a deep imperial pink, the outside of the petals silvery-rose white. See front cover, No. 1. Lady Ursula—A magnificent rose of vigorous, erect growth: exceedingly free blooming during the entire summer and autumn. The flowers produced on every shoot are very large, full and of great substance and perfect form, with high center, from which the petals gracefully reflex; .in color a delightful tone of flesh pink, distinct from all others; delicately scented.!’ Sec front cover, No. 2. for outside;





Caroline Tesfout (H. T.) (Pernet-Ducher, 1890)—Broad petals

of satiny rose make up the large, rounded flower, shaded darker at the center and lighter at the edges. These lovely blooms are produced on plants which become strong and vigorous bushes. This is the Rose used for street planting in Portland, Ore. See front cover, No. 3.



&

Los Angeles (Howard Smith, 1915) (H. T.) The following is the originator’s description: “A rose which, through its own intrinsic worth and beauty, will eventually find its way into the gardens of rose lovers throughout the world. The color is absolutely new in roses. Luminous flame pink toned with coral and shaded wih translucent gold at the base of the petals.” See front cover. No. 4.



Mrs. Aaron Ward (Pernet-Ducher, 1907) (H. T.) A remarkably floriferous variety of strong, vigorous, but compact growth; the young foliage is unusually attractive, a rich bronzy-green color, the flowers of which are of splendid form, full, double, and equally attractive when full blown as in the bud state; in color a distinct Indian yellow, shading lighter towards the edges. See front cover. No. 5. Gruss an Teplitz or Virginia R. Coxe (H. T.) (Geschwindt, 1897) Hardy in all sections; grows freely to a height of four to five feet; vivid, dazzling, fiery crimson, sweetly fragrant; produces a mass of gorgeous blooms on long stems. See front cover, No. 6. Radiance (Cook, 1909) (H. T.) A brilliant rosy-carmine, displaying beautiful rich and opaline-pink tints in the open flower. Soleil d’Or or Golden Sun Varies from orange-yellow to reddish-gold, shaded with nasturtium red; large, full, perfectly double flowers; a strong







grower and a beauty.

ULRICH BRUNNER,

H.

P

1866

132

— HOUSE

OF GURNEY, YANKTON,

S.

D.

— 1925

Baby Ramblers The Baby Rambler Roses are dwarf or semi-dwarf rose bushes producing immense quantities of flowers from June They are a very hardy class and require but little until frost. winter protection to bring them through in good condition.

We

are offering the 2 year heavy plants, dormant, 55c each; $2.50 per five.

Ellen Pouisen (Pouisen, 1912) (B. P.) Dark, brilliant pink; and very floriferous.

large, full, sweet-scented

Splendid for pot culture, bedding and massing; blooms constantly until frost.

iVladam Herbert Levavasseur, Baby Rambler or Crimson Baby Rambler (Levavasseur, 1903) (P.) The Crimson Rambler in dwarf form, with the same clear, brilliant ruby-red color. Hardy and healthy everywhere, attaining a height of twenty inches, and blooming in profuse clusters until frost, and throughout the winter

if taken indoors. The best white Baby Rambler, (D. P.) double flowers produced in great profusion. Splendid for bedding or edgings for borders. Forces well. Distinct and charming.

Yvonne Rabter

Jessie or Red Baby Rambler (IVIerryweather, 1909) (P.) Bright cherry crimson similar to Richmond in color and nonfading; claimed to excel all Baby Ramblers in beauty and color.

with

full

Rugosa Baby Rambler



Grootendorst This is a new type of rose which might properly be called a Rugosa Baby Rambler. It is a cross between Rugosa and the crimson Baby Rambler. Imagine a shurb-like Rugosa rose covered with trusses of crimson Baby Rambler roses and you will have a fair conception It is not a rose that you want to plant in of this new hybrid variety. with your bed of Hybrid Tea or Hybrid Perpetual roses, but is valuable to plant as an isolated specimen, in a mass in an exposed position, among F. J.

shrubs in the shrubbery border or for an everblooming hedge. It is admirably adapted for this last purpose. It is absolutely hardy and con$1.00 each; 5 for $4.75; 10 for tinues to bloom until late in the fall. $9.00.

Rugosa-Hybrid Perpetual Roses Hardiest of all roses; will stand the winter without winter protectionBlooms continuously from early in the summer until the ground freezes in the fall; will freeze up each season with an immense number of buds and To get best results and the most flowers, cut flowers from blossoms. them liberally as soon as in bloom.



Hansa Rugosa The description of the Conrad Ferdinand Meyer may The flowers are crimwell apply to this with the'exception of the color. son and especially fine. $1.00 each; 3 for $2.80.



Conrad Ferdinand Meyer An early flowering Hybrid combining the ornamental qualities of its Rugosa foliage with the blossom beauty and perfume of the Hybrid Perpetuals. Flowers large cupshaped and Blooms throughout season. $1.00 double, of a delicate silvery pink. each; $2.80 per 3.

Thomas Lepton — The

best pure white Rugosa rose. Strong and vigorous; grows four feet high. Flowers perfectly 80c each; $3.75 per 5; Fragrant. white. double, pure snow $6.50 per 10. Sir

Rosa Rugosa Red grown

—This rose

is

H. R.

in June, but for the beautiful foliage which the bush retains until early winter, and the large red rose apples in evidence throughout the latter part of the summer and early winter, which makes a striking contrast showing above the green leaves. Plants grow three to five feet tall. 2 year extra heavy plants, 45c each; per 5, $2.00; per 10, $3.90.

is not only produces in

perfectly hardy,

for the beautiful single red flowers that it

HANSA

DOUBLE

abundance

Climbing Roses Plants heavy two year No. 1, equal or superior to those We are able offered by others for at least double our prices. to make these prices on account of the large number we grow 40c each; 5 for and sell each season. Plants heavy, No. 1 $1.75; unless otherwise priced.

duced, from ground to tip, in large pyramidal clusters of thirty to forty. Each 40c; per 5, $1.75.



Doctor Van Fleet One of the newer types of climbers which combines absolute hardiness with flowers large as in the class. This variety shows a mass of beautiful clustered buds, which open out into large, shapely flowers; An admirable cutting variety with stems delicate flesh pink. Each 60c; per 5, $2.50. 12 to 18 inches long.

.

Tea and Noisette



Crimson Rambler The famous crimson-cluster climber, so extremely effective when grown on pillars and trellises. Makes shoots 8 to 10 feet long in a season. Flowers are pro-

Dorothy Perkins This

double.



Clear shell-pink -with flowers borne in clusters; full and without question one of the very finest of all climbing roses.

is

Each, 40c; per

5, $1.75.

Paul’s Scarlet Climber

— No other Rose, in any

class,

can compare with

this for brilliancy of color which is maintained until the petals fall. The flowers, a vivid scarlet, are of good size, semi-double, very freely produced in clusters of from 3 to 20 flowers each on much branched canes, the plants being literally covered from top to bottom with bloom. It is of strong climbing habit and hardy. This is one of the most popular climbing Roses. 60c each;

$2.50 per 5.



Queen flowers;

of the Prairie Bright rosy red; large, compact and globular bloom in clusters. Fine and a rapid grower. 40c each; 5 for $1.75.



Excelsa Known as the Red Dorothy Perkins, a very valuable addition to our list of roses. Has intense crimson scarlet double flowers in brilliant clusters and one of the handsomest of the red climbers.

set in glossy shining foliage, 45c each; per 5, $2.00.



Flower of Fairfield A few years ago when the Crimson Rambler, the hardy beautiful red climbing rose, was introduced it went over the country like wildfire. Millions of them are growing in the United States today and producing thousands of flowers each. During their blooming period, which lasts two or three weeks, they are a mass of crimson flame. The Flower of Fairfield is equally as beautiful, but is a perpetual|rose, blooming all summer. 40c each; $1.75 per 5.



/

FROM

\\

THE f HOUSE •'GURNEY

Thousand Beauties (Tausendseheen) The most sensational climbing rose yet introduced. A single cluster of flowers is a bouquet in itself. Blooms profusely from the beginning of June to the last of July. Individual flowers of graceful form. The color is the most delicate shade of soft pink, changing to carmine on reverse of petals when fully expanded. Each, 50c; per 5, $2.25. Yellow Rambler

— Light canary shade;

larger than Crimson.

CRIMSON RAMBLER OVER GATE

White Dorothy Perkins— Same white climber.

clusters smaller, individual flowers

45c each; 5 for $2.00. as

Dorothy Perkins, but pure white; best

40c each; 5 for $1.75.

A

1866— HOUSE OF GURNEY,

YANKTON,

S.

D.

— 1925

133

Climbing Vines for the purpose of covering an unsightly object like a fence, outbuilding, or for the purpose of beautifying either the porch, summer house or other place. Consequently, you want hardy vines, with a rapid top

Are

growth, something that you do not need to take down The hardiest and best of those that will stand the north are the Ampelopsis, Bitter Sweet, Beta Grape and Wild Grape. Those next in hardiness would be the Honeysuckle, Cinnamon Vine and Clematis. In the north these can be planted on the south or east side of houses, and come through the winter generally in good in the winter.

condition.

When you

receive these plants there

may

be a considerable length of vine. Do not try to save much of this because you will gain by cutting it back severely. There 'will also be considerable fine roots. See that these are spread out w’ell in the hole; that the soil is well packed, and the tops cut back to within a few inches of the ground. You will then secure a very good growth of new’ wood and it will come through the winter When you figure on planting to in good condition. cover an unsightly object put your plants 2 to 3 feet apart in the row’.

Ampelopsis Engelmanni (Engelmann’s

Ivy)



type of the Virginia Creeper, but different in grow-th as well as foliage. It has much shorter joints, and very much smaller and thicker foliage. This is the only ampelopsis that is hardy and that will cling to brick, Each, 25c; stone or plaster. It is a fast grower. 5, $1.20.

WELL TOWER AT HARDIEST RAPID

l

MANDA)



Ampelopsis Veitchi This is one of the finest climbers we have for covering walls, as it clings firmly to the smoothest surface, covering it closely with overlapped foliage, giving it the appearance of being shingled with green leaves. The color is deep green in summer, changing to the brightest shades of crimson and yellow in autumn. Each, 45c; 5, $2.00. Ampelopsis Quirtquefolia (Virginia Creeper) Deeply cut leaves which turn to a beautiful crimson in fall; fine for covering trees, rocky slopes, walls, etc. Very hardy. Each, 25c; 5 for $1.20.



—A rapid growing name from the peculiar fragrance the Cinnamon Vine

of

climber, taking its delicate white flow’ers.

Each, 15c; 8, $1.00. Clematis All Clematis require a deep rich soil, plenty of water and good drainage. Should be planted with the crowns three inches beneath the surface of the soil. Clematis Paniculata Handsome hardy climber. Is one of the choicest and most satisfactory climbing flowering plants. Of strong, rapid growth. Dense, small bright green foliage. Pure white fragrant flowers in August and September, followed by silvery feathery seed pods. Each, 30c; $1.50 per 5. Clematis (Madam Edouard Andre) Has been called the crimson Jackmanni. This plant is a strong, vigorous grower, very free in bloom, lovely flow’ers of a distinct crimson color. Different from all other varieties. Each, 65c; per 5, $3.00. Jackmanni Clematis Well known, large-flowering blue









Clematis, flowers almost violet with a rich velvety appearance, distinctly veined. Blooms from July until frost. Plant Each, 65c. is hardy, abundant and successful. Clematis Hertryi This is the finest of all large flowering white clematis. A vigorous grow’er and free bloomer. Flow’ers large creamy white with reddish chocolate anthers. Each, 80c. Wistaria These are a very popular vine and do well where they are grown in a protected spot, valued on account of their graceful climbing habits and the long panicles of flowers that they bear in profusion. The flowers are pea-shaped, bloom in May and June. Wistaria, Purple This variety bears in great profusion large clusters of pea-shaped flowers, blooms in May and June. Hardy in sheltered locations. Each, 50c; per 5, $2.00. Wistaria, White This variety is pure white grape, someEach, 65c; per 5, $3.00. [times tinted light blue. Beta Grape A rapid grower, is very popular for covering iwalls, summer housesand porches; hardy. Each, 30c; 5, $1.25. Trumpet Vine (Radicans) A robust, woody vine, twining with numerous roots along its stems; its orange-scarlet, trumpet-shaped flow’ers cluster at the tips of the branches. Each, 30c; 10, $2.50. Bittersweet (Celastrus Scan dens) A perfectly hardy Handsome, glossy foliage. Large clus{vine of rapid growth. ters of beautiful orange-crimson berries that are retained all















winter. The are in

berries

great

demand

for inside winter decorations. e do not know of

W

any vine that is

more

satisfac*

tory than

the

Bittersweet. It is exceptionally fine for trellises, porches. If you

KUDZU VINE

wish something to give a little color to your

one at the base of the shade trees. This vine seems to do better on the trees than some of the othervines that make such a heavy growrth that they sooner or later damage the shade tree. Each, 30c; per 5, $1.25. trees plant

Wild Grape

— One

covering porches, 10, $1.50.

of the

best

if

summer houses and

not the best arbors.

grape for

Each, 20c; per



Beta Grape Seedlings See description in grape section of the catalog. Price: 15c each; 10 for $1.25; 25 for $2.50; 50 for $3.50; 100 for $6.00. Honeysuckle (Scarlet and Yellow Climbing) These are very hardy, producing large quantities of long, trumpet-shaped flow’ers; heavy, glossy leaves make them one of the most valuEach, 25c; 5,151.25. able of the hardy climbers. Honeysuckle (Halleana) Color, an intermingling of white and yellow’, extremely fragrant and most satisfactory. This is the variety most often found growing on porch trellises, Each, 25c; 5, $1.25. or used as a covering.







Kudzu Vine (Puereria Thunbergiana) Large foliage and dense shade, growing 50 feet in one season. Flowers plentiful Each, 30c; 5, $1.25. in August; rosy-purple, pea-shaped.

Lyceum Chinese

(Chinese

Matrimony Vine)

—A

general

hardy, climbing vine that will overcome any obstacle growth and flourish everywhere. Each new shoot produces handsome purple flowers, and later a prodigious crop of scarlet Each, 25c; 5, $1.00. 2 year Heavy. berries. utility,

in

YANKTON,

1866— HOUSE OF GURNEY,

134

D.— 1925

S.

Hardy

Perennials

These plants are perennial, which means that they live for a number of years, but the tops die down each year after blooming. They bloom on the new wood that comes up the next year. When you receive them there will be more or less fine roots, and should be taken care of as you would a strawberiy. The erowm should not be covered more than 1 or 2 inches, depending on the plant. Give them good cultivation, some mulching, and they will repay you in the spring. The perennial plants are the most popular of all flowering plants; when planted once they are always there, living through the winter with little or no protection. In most cases the flowers increase as the plants grow older. The plants are all strong field grown.



The Early Achillea Height, 2 feet, very best white flowered border plants, resembling Pompon Chrysanthemums. 20c each; 5 for 75c.



Aquilegia, Single Mixed Plants aie strong and thrifty. Flowand vary in color through charming tones of cream, pink, lavender, blue, white, red, etc., hardly anyr tw o being exactly alike.

ers large

T

20c each; 90c per 5. Aquilegia Chrysantha Bright yellow long spurred flowers. 20c each; 90c per 5. Very fine. Height, 3 to 4 feet A. Caerulea (Rocky Mountain Columbine) Blooms from May to July. Height, 12 to 18 inches. Flowers are larger and composed of five petals of bright violet-blue, with a pure white corolla. Borne on slender stems, and sway and nod in the gentlest breeze. Used 20c each; 5 for 75c. for cut-flowers. Bleeding Heart Blooms May to June. Height, 2 feet. Flowers pink and w hite; heart shaped. A well-known hardy perennial, producing its flowers freely in spring and early summer in graceful, drooping racemes, sometimes a foot in length. 60c each; 5 for $2.50.





.



Coreopsis— Flowers deep golden

AQUILEGIA Delphinium Chinense—A very pretty fine feathery foliage

panicles.

feet high. location.

drawf

and intense gentian-blue

20c each; 90c per

species,

flow'ers in

with open

5.



Delphinium Formosum The old favorite dark blue with white center, 3 to 4 feet high, very vigorous and one of the best. 20c each; 90c per 5. Delphinium, Tall English A fine strain from England. Plants are strong, vigorous, with large flowers on spikes two feet and over, the majority running in the lighter shades of 20c each; 90c per 5. blue. Dianthus Barbatus (Sweet William) Charming, hardy plants, great favorites in every garden. Stems 12 to 18 inches high, flowers in greatest profusion in large, round top clusters. If the fading branches are cut away fresh ones appear at intervals all summer. 20c each; 80c per 5. Dianthus Plumarius (Common Grass or Garden Pink) Thick tufts of handsome bluish-green foliage and pretty





Make

Golden Glow Rudbeckia

r



Grows 5 to 7 feet, and blooms Flowers resemble golden frost. 15c each; per 5, 60c. Heliopsis Pitcheriana (Greek “Like the Sun”) Flowers are of a beautiful deep golden yellow, about 2 inches in diameter, of very thick texture and a useful cut flow'er. Grow's about 3 feet high. 20c each; 85c per 5.

from early summer

until

yellow cactus dahlias.



feet.



Bloom from June until September; height, They are among the most handsome and orna-

Hollyhocks 4 to 5

garden flowers. They should have slight covering 20c each; 5 for 75c; 10 for $1.35. in winter. Oriental Poppy Far surpass in bloom all the annual and biennial kinds, and for a gorgeous display of rich and brilliant coloring nothing equals them during their period of flow'ering in May and June. Color, dark red. Each, 20c; 90c per 5. Platycodon (Japanese Bell Flower) Form neat branched bushes of upright habit, 2 to 2 feet high, producing their attractive blue or w'hite flow'ers from July to October, deservedly one of the most popular hardy plants. 20c each; 90c per 5. Lychnis Chalcedonica A veiy showy border plant. Flowers heart lobed stars of brightest vermilion, arranged in large flat panicles. Height, 2 to '3 feet. Each, 20c; 5 for 75c.

mental

of all

Very hardy and grows w ell anywhere. 20c each; 85c per 5. Grandiflora Superba (Blanket Flower) Gaillardi Makes one of the most gorgeous and prodigious displays of all the perennials. Flowers often measure 3 inches in diameter on clean, 2-foot stems. A hard center of deep maroon is thickly bordered by petals of orange and yellow, strikingly ringed by Poor soil will do, and a circles of crimson, red and maroon. Each, 20c; constant show’ is assured from June till frost. per dozen, $1.70. Perennial Sweet Pea Vines grow very fast and flowers are similar to Sweet Peas, white and pink. A very satisfactory plant and easy to grow. Each, 25c; 5 for $1.00; 10 for $1.80. Shasta Daisy A rigorously selected mixture of Burbank’s new sorts, giving us different forms and much larger flowers ranging in shape from fully double to single, and in color from pure w'hite to pale lemon yellow. Plants. are extremely productive of bloom, making as spectacular a field show and as Each, 20c; profitable a cut flower supply as any Hardy Perennial grown. per 10, $1.75. Yucca Filamantosa (Adam’s Needle) This is a hardy evergreen plant producing long leaves; a tall stock producing sometimes as high as 200 flow'ers of pure white; blooming period about June and July. The leaves remain green A fine plant for sunny, exposed places and for the lawn. the entire year. 25c each; per 5, $1.00. carnation-like, fragrant flowers.

%

borne on stems 1 to 2 Plants succeed in any sunny

yellow’

very nice cut flowers.

Each, 20c; 5 for 60c; 10 for $1.15.













Hardy Fern the Black Hills of South Dakota w’e gather each year large quantities hardy ferns in a number of varieties. These are specially valuable for the north and -northeast sides of the house, along the north sides of fences, or where they They do well in shady, are protected from the direct southern rays of the sun. moist situations. We consider this one of the most satisfactory plants for the shady, cool places. Large clumps, each, 35c; 5, $1.50; 10, $1.90.

From

of

Hardy Phlox No

hardy plants is more desirable than the Perennial Phloxes. They will thrive in any position and be used to advantage in the hardy border, in large groups on the lawm, or planted in front of belts of shrubbery, where, by judicious pinching back and removing faded flowers, a constant succession of bloom may be had until frost. We offer a select list of strong field grown root%. Coquelicot Glowing orange red with violet eye. Jean D’Arc Undoubtedly the very finest pure white variety to date. The plants are extra strong growers of medium height, producing exceptionally large heads. Ideal for hedging or massing. Pantheon The peerless pink. Extra large, always flat flowers of salmon rose. Richard Wallace White, with large carmine eye. Terre Neuve Lavender, light center. Continued on "page 1S5. class of

— —







PHLOX HARDY





— HOUSE

1866

OF GURNEY, YANKTON,

S.

D.

— 1925

135

Hardy Phlox (Continued) Pecheur ©’Island

—Lavender-cerise, superior to other

varieties of similar color.



Sunset Dark rosy pink. An excellent hardy variety of vigorous growth, producing an unusual amount of blooms throughout the season. Sir Edward Lancier Rich crimson. One of the best Each, 20c; Tall growing, free bloomer. of its color. 95c per 5; $1.80 per 10.



Trial

ground mixture Extra Heavy each 15c; 5

for

65c; 10 for $1.10; 25 for $3.00; 100 for $10.00.

Phlox Subulata (Hardy Mountain Pink) An early spring-flowering type, with pretty moss-like evergreen foliage, which, during the flowering season, hidden under the masses of bloom. An excellent plant for the rockery, the border, and invaluable for carpeting Each, 15c; per 12. the ground for covering graves. is

$1.50.

Bulbs and Tubers These

will

come to you

as the

as bulbs or as tubers.

Some

means that they can be

left in

names

—either

indicate

them are hardy, which the ground continuously. Others, not hardy, that must be taken up each fall and stored in a cellar where they will not freeze. Of the hardy varieties, the Day Lily, Iris, Peony, Phlox, Lily of the Valley and Japanese Lilies are to be left^in the ground the year around. The Caladium, Tuberose, Dahlia, Gladiolus and Canna are to be taken up after frost in the fall, the dirt removed from them and placed in a cellar that would be suitable for keeping vegetables. They are to be taken out in the spring at planting time and planted out just as you did the year before. All of the bulbs and tubers, both hardy and tender, willjre of

received by you ready for planting, and will all produce flowers or luxuriant foliage the first year. The Japanese and Day Lily bulbs should be planted about 18 inches apart. These will gradually thicken. Lily of the Valley, about 6 or 8 inches apart. Caladium, about 3 feet apart, as you grow it for the foliage only. Iris, 1 foot apart in the row. Dahlia, 2 to 3 feet apart in the row. Peonies, about 3 feet apart. Gladiolus, 8 to 10 inches apart. Gannas, if in beds, about 18 inches apart, for best results. Hardy Phlox, about 18 inches apart.

Iris

None

hardy blue Iris that was used for borders from the door to the gate on each of the walks; a bed of it planted up close to the house and blooming the earliest of any of the flowers in the spring. There has been a wonderful change and improvement in the Iris; hundreds of colors and combinations of colors; hardly a color can be imagined today that you do not find in the Iris. The' size of the flower and the plant has increased wonderfully, and this past season we had them in the nursery blooming at six inches high and some of the latest varieties standing fully five feet, and covered with immense blooms measuring 10 and 12 inches across. They are all perfectly hardy. of

you

will forget the

Japanese 8ris— Iris

are truly wonderful, some standing 5 to 5J4 feet high, producing flowers as much as one foot Every shade of the rainbow is represented in the across. different flowers. Blooming in June and July after the German Ship in spring only. Iris are through.

Alba Plena large,

—Pure white; very

40c each.

Blue Danube

—Pure rich blue,

velvety center, 35c each.

Gold Bond

—A

fine

Firefly (Ufa -

Deep ter;

no

Mahogany

Othello veined



velvety,

45c each.



overlaid,

and

25c each.

Lavender-blue,

white,

white

center;

75c each.

Victor

EARLY SPRING

Hotaru)—

— Deep

red.



White, veined violetpurple center; six petals.

30c each.

Iris falls

are pencilled purple,

10c each; 5 for 40c. Uppers white, falls pencilled or striped golden, fading to pure white. 15c each; 5 for 60c. Florida Uppers pale yellow, falls similar shaded slightly deeper yellow. Height, 12 inches. 12c each; 5 for 50c. Her Majesty Uppers pink, falls reddish purple pencilled white. Free bloomer. 12c each; 5 for 55c. Mad. Chereau Uppers and falls pure white, heavily bordered with dainty blue. One of the most charming sorts. 12c each; 5 for 55cl Mrs. H. Darwin Uppers pure white, falls pencilled Very daintily purple, tips of falls fading to pure white. 12c each; 5 for 55c. fine. President Harding Uppers rich dainty lavender, falls deeper lavender showing some yellow on falls near stem. One of the daintiest. Excellent. Height, 24 inches. 20c each; 5 for SOc. Johan DeWitt Uppers lilac blue, falls purple daintily pencilled with white near stem. Height, 20 inches. 12c each; shading to lavender.

Engberg









5 for 50c.

Walhalla



Pure yellow uppers, falls light yellow pencilled A very showy yellow Iris. Height, 18 to 22 Each, 10c; 5 for 40c.

reddish bronze. inches.

Siberian Iris

40c each.

Orion White, bordered maroon.

blue,

—Uppers bronze lavender,

tips of falls

purple, golden yellow censix petals.

mahogany

large.

-

German No. 1

IRIS



double,

with gold banded Each, 25c; $1.00 per 5.

pure' white center.

THE BEAUTIFUL GERMAN

Hardiest of all Iris, very strong, free growers, adapting themselves to any soil; producing large quantities of blue and white flowers under the most adverse conditions from June to August. The foliage stands more erect and is finer than other On that Is a rich dark green throughout the season. Iris. account they are very valuable in landscaping. Sibirica Purplish-blue flowers, 3 feet high; useful for 15c each; $1.50 per doz.; $10.00 per 100. cutting. Snow Queen This new variety possesses all the merits of the type, differing only in color, which is an ivory-white. 15c each;, $1.50 per doz.; $10.00 per 100.





The This includes

Iris Trial all

of

25, $1.95; 50, $3=50.

Ground Mixture

the Iris except Japanese.

10, 90c*

18 66

136

— HOUSE

OF GURNEY, YANKTON,

S.

D.— 1925

Peony sight of the newly opened flower you have that feeling of has at sight of her first born.

At the

first

awe and reverence that

a

young mothe

In getting up this descriptive list and peony guide, w that we Are only doing what is expected of us by thos of our customers who have already fallen willing victim to the lures of this most seductive and fascinating c hardy perennials. To our mind, there is no flower so we suited to our western country as this peony which, stand ing the severest cold of winter and almost unlimited neg

feel

lect,

produces such gorgeous blooms, and when given

care and attention responding with blossoms of sucl perfect loveliness and fragrance as to thrill the soul of th true flower lover. little

No matter in what direction your taste lies, if you ap predate any form of beauty you will find something t

ARCHI-

GURNEY Is it to be wondered at that we have turn to the peony. so varied an assortment of blooms, each perfect in its own particular way, when we realize that for close upon a thousand and a half years the Tree Peony has been the recipient of the .attention of the Imperial House of China, with all the care for artistic and dainty details that the Oriental can give?

In Europe the early history of the peony is lost in the maze with its bypaths of superstitions, fables and One story runs that a certain ancient Grecian physician named Paeon, a pupil of Aesculapius, a famous doctor, miraculously cured the wounds of Pluto which he had received from Hercules. This cure caused the jealousy of Aesculapius Pluto, however, and resulted in his secretly murdering Paeon was not forgetful of benefits received, and following the prevailof antiquity,

myths.

among Greek Deities, showed his gratitude to Paeon by turning him into the flower which we now know as the ing fashion

Since then, various magical properties have been attributed to it.

Peony.

Still, in spite of its antiquity, it is only within the last century and a half that the peony has been brought to its present state of perfection, the first definite steps in this direction being taken by M. Jacques, the gardener of King Louis Phillip

We

want you to see them yourselves, watch them of France. and care for them, and we know that once you have beheld the sheer loveliness of such a bloom as Marie Lemoine, like Oliver Twist, you will wish for more.

VISITORS IN The peony

THE PEONY

FIELDS. GEO. W.

is

grief

and come out



Trial

139 we tell you of the “trial ground mixtures,” want to impress on you the value of that particular lot All of the new ones, most of the old ones tried out and no matter wKat the results they all go into this mixture. Just a few plants of each some worth many dollars all 1

of peony.



j

I

|

of colors.

train rushes through this peony field, and the eyt passes from one variety and color to the next, you get that) kaleidoscopic effect that is so pleasing, and you only wish the train would stop long enough so that you could gather arms! full of these monstrous, beautiful fragrant flowers, and we] want to assure you that you would be welcome to them.

As your

I

t|

CITY,

IOWA

them, keep the weeds and grass away from the growing plants, and you will have a wealth of flowers equal to or more beautiful than the finest roses, fragrant, and for cut flower purposes will keep from a few to 15 days in water.

We

send out only the strongest of the field grown plants, We are not asking the real fancy prices that for peonies, but are offering them at the right prices, so that everyone should be able to have and enjoy this, the 3 to 5 eyes.

some do

most beautiful

of the' flowers.

Ground Mixtures

On Page

and

In stopping at Yankton, this summer, you will, just befor you enter town from the northwest on the Milwaukee Road go through the center of one of our peony fields. This fiek consists of 20 acres of the real fancy varieties and it is th* show place of the whole country. We want you to watch fo it from the right-hand side of the train as you come in. Jus to the west of the peony field and adjoining it are more thai 200 acres of our nursery ground. The field of peonies by the railroad track is only one of ou; many fields; we believe we have the greatest assortment anc the greatest acreage of peonies of any one, and we have al of the varieties that are worth while, j Peonies may be planted either in September and October or in the springtime, as you prefer, and should be plantec Plant them in beds, rows or singkl liberally by everyone. specimen plants, and you will be surprised and gratified with the results. I cannot speak too highly or urge too hard thal you plant peonies in quantities. Get an assortment of varieties, something that will cover the entire season with its wealth

BROCK FAMILY AND FRIENDS OF SIOUX

one of the hardiest of the flowers. It will smiling, than almost any other plant or shrub. Their requirements are simple the rich soil, the sunlight for best results, but will do wonderfully well in partial shade. When planted in the sha,de they should be Then when the staked, as they are apt to grow too tall. immense flower opens it bends the stalk to the ground and you lose the beauty of it. Once planted, they increase in beauty each year. Plant them so that the crowns or buds are covered with 2^ inches of soil, press the soil firmly about

stand more

satisfy you somewhere among the infinite variety of color and color combinations, the diversity of flower types, am the varying heights of the peony. Do you want large voluptuous blooms eight to ten inches across, of a sen suous tropical appearance and possessing an unsurpassec exotic fragrance? Turn to the peony. Or do you wisl for a delicate, airy flower, like a rosy pink cloud in th early dawn, fading away to a pearly gray edge? Agah



good enough to produce a mass of the beautiful flowers and unless you are a Peony expert you would think them all “best.” Prices Collection No. i, 5 plants, $1.25; Collection No. 2, 10 plants, $2.25; Collection No. 3, 25 plants; $5.50; Collection No. 4, 50 plants, $9.50.

Mr. and Mrs. Lee

and Mrs. Aberdeen,

.

Mellette, S. D.

A Nationally Famous Event! Each year the month of June beckons flower lovers from all corners of the country to Yankton, S. D., where peonies and 'brides blossom forth to share the honors of “Peony Festival Week.”

This famous annual event has become a Gurney



institution in other words, a standing invitation to the public to share the beauty of Gurney Peonies and the merriment of la

peony wedding

festival.



The House of Gurney raises millions of peonies among them many rare varieties. Every summer, field upon field of

De Lapp S.

The Flower

The More than

Girls.

.

Peony Field, June 15, 1924 gorgeous blossoms toss their array of colors and their infinite fragrance before admiring audiences. And in the midst of this arena of bloom, on a sunshiny June day during “Peony Festival Week,” brides and grooms exchange vows and receive the good wishes of the thousands who witness the happy ceremony.

Some time—better make while

it

1925

“Peony Festival Week”

is

plan to arrive in Yankton — on! The House of Gurney

welcomes vou!

Peony Wedding An Annual The Gurney Seed & Nursery Company’s peony week and annual peony wedding have been commented on all over the United States. Pictures of the peony field, the crowds and the wedded couples have been used in Sunday colored supplements of the largest papers in the United States and always commented on in the nicest way. We want at least a triple wedding for the peony fields in 1925. We furnish the Minister, the music, the flower girls, |the flowers,/ and make your stay in Yankton just as pleasant

and Mrs. McCauley Chamberlain, S. D.

D.

All married in our

Affair

If you have an idea of getting married make it a as we can. peony wedding, part of the wedding trip to Yankton, the city that appreciates and takes care of its guests. This is a personally written page and is an invitation from Mrs. Gurney and myself that the brides come direct to our home on their arrival in Yankton where they will be enter-

tained as our guests during their stay.

You

are cordially in-

vited.

Brides and Grooms. Their Parents and a Part o 6,000 People Witnessed this Beautiful Ceremony

Mr. and Mrs. D. B. Gurney.

GURNEY, YANKTON,

1866—HOUSE OF

138

S.

D.— 1925

Peony— continued Ambrose petals

and

Later

it

Verschaffelt

— Crown type with

lighter center.

fine pink, outer high, flowers of medium size.

Crown

turns a fine delicate pink over

all.

Good

rich green



40c each.

foliage.



Bunker

heavy immense compact

type,

Full rose Hill flowers of fine rose shape.

A

deep rich showy red, really a beauty. A bouquet of these flowers looks very much like our Extra good. $1.00 each. true American Beauty rose.

Creamy White

—Crown type flowers

good guards with delicate creamy inner petals and red per 5. 35c each; $1.50 center. of

White

size.

pistils in

—Taken

around, this is one of the You may pick three flowers and finest Peonies in existence. one of them will have a delicate, faint, lingering, reflex of gold in the center; the next may have the center suffused with heliotrope and the next a pinkish glow, the whole flower giving the impression of a huge pyramid of baby pink fading away to A great Peony. $2.00 each; $8.00 per the purest white.

Bonnie

all

—Similar to peony described as Souvenir de Exposi-

tion, but more erect habit and later double pink. Very floriferous, midseason and an excellent variety for grouping. Yellow stamens in center, very Petals slightly tipped silver. 45c each; $2.00 per five. distinct.



Clarie Du Bois A good rich pink, above medium size, producing immense amount of flowers on long, stiff stems, fragrant, fine variety later than midseason. 75c each; $3.50

per

five.

Delicatissima peony.

under

It is all

noted for its hardiness and profusion of bloom 50c each; $2.00 per five.

conditions.

Duchess D’Orleans stems.

Fragrant.

Euphemia

—A good medium-sized pink with long Each

Late.

35c; $1.50 per five.

—Semi-double type.

Flowers very large, borne in clusters. A beautiful pink over all. The yellow stamens are interspersed among the large wavy petals. 40c each; $1.80 per five.

—Very

Edulus Superba

large, with silvery reflex

round and and crinkled

bright rose pink it a most charming mottled appearance. Each 30c; 5 for $1.25. best.

One

fluffy flower;

petals, giving of the earliest

and

— (Mechin, 1874). Dark velvety crimson. Francis Ortegat—This variety was originated in 1850 and Edouard Andre

65c each; $3.00 per

five.

holds a high place among many peony fanciers, producing deep crimson flowers well above the foliage. Medium to large. Strong grower. Each 70c; 5, $3.00. still

Eugene Verdier to

— (Calot,

hydrangea-pink;

Each

Delicate blush, shading

1864).

guards

outer

lilac-pink.

Extra

fine.

$2.00.



Maxima Undoubtedly the finest white peony in Mr. Harrison says: “This flower has reached the ultimate beyond which we cannot go. Here at the door stands Festiva Maxima, white as the soul of the Madonna, with now and then a blood drop, as though the iron had sometimes entered her heart. What a marvelous flower!” It is a flower of wondrous beauty with clear carmine spots on center petals, of enormous size, measuring 7 or 8 inches in diameter. It has held first place in the peony world for over 60 years. Each 50c; 5 for $2.25. Fesfiva

existence.

— Rose

General Hooker

type.

Huge,

flowers, profuse bloomer.

Deep, rich red. Large and heavy, extra fine.

full

85c each.



Gurney’s 357 Pink This is the most desirable of all peonies of its color, being immense in size, full bomb type, free bloomer, ;petals tipped with silver, borne on long upright stems standing

when most other large flowers are breaking over. SeasonEach 80c; 5 for $3.50. Gurney’s Pink Crown type. A fine pink color, rich and

erect

very

late.



lasting. Full and fluffy and delightful. A very profuse bloomer producing an elegant effect. 60c each; 5 for $2.75.



A

Golden Harvest (Rosenfield, 1900). beautiful tricolored bloom of peach-pink, golden-yellow and paper-white. Elegant. 50c each; $2.00 per 5.



A

Hello Central Anemone type. rich pink. As the flowers opens up completely the pistils become visible, exposing their bright red tips. 35c each; $1.50 for 5.

Holland Pink

—A

good rich pink, above medium

size,

producing an immense amount of flowers on long stems. Fragrant. 50c each; $2.00 per 5.



Iceberg (Crown Type) Creamy white over Flowers come in big clusters.

early white peony. per 5, $2.00.



Iris Pleas Pleas. loose, flat, rose type.

Pale $ 2 . 00 .

dazzling effect.

lilac rose,

A

fine

Each

55c;

all.

shaded white.

Large,

Each





.

La Tulipe Semi-double, almost white shaded lilac. Outer uards blotched crimson. Very large size, flowers fragrant, orne on long strong stems. 60c.

Madam

'

J

65c.

Bomb type. Light rose color and flowers Fairly early. Hardy and profuse. Should be in every An old favorite. 35c each.

L’Esperance garden.

!

|

!

'



Ducel Very large globular bloom of soft pink with Very free bloomer and strong grower; earl y.

silver reflex.

70c each; $3.00 per

j

five.

Marechal Valiiant



Large light red flower long stems; 70c each; $3.00 per five.

late.



Marie Jacquin What shall we say of this large, glorious Color glossy rosy-white, with rose tinge on buds with a great wealth of golden-yellow stamens in the center which give it a very chaste and elegant appearance. When first planted the blooms come single, but after becoming estab-

I

flower.

semi-double. The flowers of this charming variety suggest our native white Water Lily, fragrance very rich and Each 55c; $2.00 per five. languorous. lished

j

j

it is

Mikado No. full

—Rose type,

flowers large, profuse bloomer. pink or light red over all. This is a very desirable early

Deep



Louis Van Houtte (Calot, 1876). Very fine, shapely bloom; medium to large flower; color bright violaceous-red of

large.



Baroness Schroeder

La Coquotte Guards and crown light pink, color rosewhite, center flecked carmine, fragrant, midseason, produces Each $1.25; $5.00 per five.

lots of flowers.

the

Variegatis Semi-rose type. A fine delicate pink over all, with a few dark red blotches in center. Flowers borne on long stems. 60c each.

Cream

five,



Jubilee The flower is the largest size, often eight to nine inches in diameter, of the purest white when fully blown. Each $7.00.

1—This

Japanese type

first

is an excellent variety usually shows two years then full double with peta-

!

I j

loids separating the guards from the center of rich, yellow I The flower in all is old rose and very attractive. Each color. 1

75c; $3.00 per five.



Miles Standish Rose type; late midseason, Globular form, compact and full; very rich and dark erimson; free Each 70c; $3.00 per five. bloomer.

Messonier

—Bomb

Full double flowers; type, midseason. deep, velvety cardinal, violet tipped; wonderfully rich and “American referred to as the Beauty.” Sometimes brilliant. Very popular as a cut flower. Each 50c; 5 for $2.25.



Marie Lemoine Rose type, very late. The flowers are enormous and massive, often eight to ten inches across. Color, ivory white with occasional narrow carmine tracing on edge The gigantic blooms come very late on stout, of some petals. A sort the peony erect steins, standing well above the foliage. enthusiast raves over, and well he may. 90c each.



Marie Sloan Full deep rose, lighter shading towards the Early and profuse bloomer. Good and showy, pro40c each; 5 for $1.80, ducing a grand water lily effect. tips.

Mrs. Douglas— Crown type. Flowers large. Shell pink, the inner peta’s a fine cream color. Center or crown, pure w hite, blotched here and there with a deep claret or wine color. 50c each; 5 for $2.00.

,



j

!

l

I

|

?

j

i

|

3

I

.

8 I

1

1

1

. j

I

j

I

;

1866— HOUSE

OF GURNEY, YANKTON,

Peony

S.

D.

— 1925

139

—continued. Single Varieties Peonies

—Rich pink, large; early and profuse, 25c each. —Pure white and early and profuse, 25c. Single Red —Large and beautiful, showy; early; long stem, Single Pink

White

large,

25c.

Our

Trial

Ground Mixture

In our trial grounds we try out thousands of different varieties of bulbs, plants and trees, just a few each of all the varieties that we grow and are really the choicest of anything in the nursery. At the end of each season these are dug and placed in our trial ground mixture and this season we are keeping them out of the mixture and are going to offer them to our customers at low prices, so you may have a lot of flowers specially at a reasonable price and get the very best.

— 5 plants —10 plants Collection No. 3—25 plants Collection No. 4—50 plants Collection No.

1

$1.25

Collection No. 2

EDULUS SUPERBA, EACH, Madame

de Verneville

30c

1

— Crousse 1885—Pure white, with

carmine tipped central petals; delightfully fragrant; large compact and perfect bloom; an exceptionally free bloomer in clusters and a high-class cut-flower; very erect grower, 27 to 30 inches high. Begin blooming May 31st. A superb variety. Each, 70c.



Neptune

1905)

(Dessert,

—Crown

midseason.

type;

Habit of plant, tall and erect. Lilac-white crown, color milkFragrant; free bloomer. white, with creamy- white stigmas. Each, $1.50.

Nigracans

—Beautiful

above foliage. per 5, $5.00.

flowers

dark red, producing

A

Fragrant.

high class flower.

well

Each, $1.25;

2.25 •

We

will furnish 100 of our Trial Ground Mixture of peonies These must be at a special price of $14.00 per hundred. ordered by one of the officers of the organization in order to full 100 must be ordered to get get these special prices. these special prices.

A

Madame

Crousse

ters; large flowers of

thought by

many



(Calot, 1866). Free bloomer in cluspure w'hite with crimson flecks on crown;

to be the best all-around white.



Paganini Crown type. Midseason. Clear bright pink center ligulated salmon with lily rose tuft. Each, 60c; per 5, $2.75.



Revlsii Outer petals light pink/ center darker pink fading to white. Flowers medium size, fragrant. Each, 30c; per 5, $1.25.

all



Bomb to crown type. Fine pink with darker blotches in center and also some

Reine Victoria '

Each, 45c.

Solfatare (Calot, 1861)— Guard petals snow-white; center ’'sulphur-yellow, changing as the flower ages to pure white; all the petals are wade. This we consider ah extra fine peony. Each, 40c.

Souvenir De (.’Exposition (De Mans')— (Mechin, Very large, fine flower, bright reddish violet, % Each, 60c. reflex.

1880)

with pronounced silvery



j

I

Terry’s Yellow Outer petals cream, center yellow' fading to lighter yellow'. This is the nearest yellow of any peony on the market. Each, 60c; 5 for $2.75.

—Delicate shell-pink; Victor — Deep pink very

Venus

extra for cut flowers.

Each, 80c; 5 for $3.50.

solid color; crowm type; Each, 50c; 5 for $2.20.

good stems; midseason. 524

Venus (Kelway,

Virgin red.

Mary

Rose type.

1888).

—A

delicate shell-pink

Each, 70c.

extra for cut flowers.

— Most

beautiful

white flaked with

Each, $1.75; 5 for $6.75.



Crown type; guards open, pink fading to purest white; center purest ivory medium size. A fine memidseason. Above white; dium priced white peony. Each, 60c; 5 for $2.75. William McKinley

shell

Youth and Beauty

—Crown

type.

A

large

and

magnificent flower of a delightful pure delicate pink. Each, 45c; 5 for $2.00. :

5.50

Special prices on our Trial Ground Mixture of Peonies to cemetery associations, Park Boards, and other organizations who wish to purchase these to improve their Church Property, City.



over

.

9.50

Pink petals; profuse Plentiful Anemone type. bloomer. Early and fine. A great show when the It truly Suggests its name, “ Plenplant is in bloom. Each, 40c. tiful.”

lighter tufts.

.

NEPTUNE, EACH,

$1.50

Each, 65c.

1866— HOUSE OF GURNEY,

140

YANKTON,

Gladiolus

S.

D.

— 1925

— 15 Superior Varieties

Most

satisfactory summer flowering bulbs needing so little attention and thriving as well in almost any soil. The bulbs should be set from three to six inches apart in rows, or, for massing, six inches apart and about four inches deep. Our list is a selection of the cream of hundreds of varieties which are grown on our own farm under our own supervision. America Beautiful, soft flesh-pink, faintly tinged with lavender. Spikes develop very evenly and to unusual length, sometimes with two or three branches. A magnificent cut flower. It took the flower-loving world by storm when first introduced and holds undisputed first place among all Gladioli with unabated popularity. 7c each; 50c per doz.; $3.00 per 100. Baron Hulot Rich deep indigo blue or purple. This is entirely distinct in color from all other gladioli. 9c each; 12 for 90c. Chicago White— A fine white variety with lavender stripes on lower petals. From seven to eight flowers open at one time. 7c each; 50c per dcz. ; $3.50 per 100. Cracker Jack Dark red, throat spotted with maroon. Sc each; 50c per doz.; $3.00 per 100. Empress of India Rich dark maroon, almost black, the darkest colored Gladiolus we know. 7c each; 50c for 12; $4.00 per 100. Halley Delicate salmon-pink, slightly roseate, the lower petals showing a creamy blotch bisected by a red stripe. One of the earliest to bloom. 7c each; 05c per doz.; $3.75 per 100. Mrs. Frank Pendleton All experts agree that this is one of the finest varieties yet introduced. Large size borne on straight spikes, a lovely salmon pink with A color combination rivaling any of the brilliant deep red blotches in the throat. 10c each; 90c per doz.; $5.75 per ICO. finest orchids. Mrs. Francis King A fine strong growing variety with large spikes of showy















Color a bright shade of pure scarlet. 8c each; 50c per doz.; $3.50 per See cover. Pink Beauty Rose pink with dark blotch. Very early. 12c each; $1.00 per doz.; $5.00 per 100. Panama A new derivation from America, which is more deeply pink and a Without a doubt the one finest pink Gladiolus. 10c trifle larger than its parent. each; 75c per doz.; $4.00 per 100. See cover. Pink Perfection Daintily formed, very large flowers of apple blossom pink. Each, 10c; per doz., 90c; $5.00 per 100. Peace Immense pure white flowers with a touch of carmine in the lower petals, borne on long graceful spikes. Beautiful and exceedingly fine. 8c each; 12 for SOc. Schwaben Extremely showy both as a cut flower and a bedder. 'The color is pure canary yellow shaded sulphur, the golden yellow throat slightly blotched with dull carmine, but so deep as not to interfere with the all-yellow general effect. Flower spikes are tall and strong, numerous and well set with perfect flowers. Its characteristic branching habit keeps this variety in bloom unusually long. See cover. Each 7c; Per 10, 55c. War Deep blood red, shaded crimson-black. Very tall and conspicuous. The best Gladiolus Try it. Each, of this beautiful shade of red. 10c; per doz., 85c. Willie Wigman— Large wide open flower, bloom blush tint with long bright red tulip blotch on lower petal; spike of graceful habit, and the effect of the crimson on the cream petal is most pleasing. 9c each; 75c per doz. Primulinus Hybrid Gladiolus These were originally introduced from South Africa but have been wonderfully improved by crossing with choice garden varieties. They are quite distinct from the usual run of Gladiolus. The Orchid-like flowers are borne on slender, long spikes. The range of color is brilliant and beautiful. Planted in groups they make a wonderful display in the garden. For cut flowers their wonderful coloring shows to best advantage. Mixed Primulinus Fine mixture of all colors. 10 for 40c; 85c per 25; $1.80 per 50, flowers.

100.

















The

Gladiolus Trial

Ground Mixture

This is composed of practically every Gladiolus that grows. They were in lots of from just a few bulbs up to hundreds of some varieties, all grown into beautiful bulbs and placed in the trial ground mixture. These will run through all the colors of the Gladioli: Blue, purple, lavender, pink, white, red, cream, in fact, any color that Gladioli produces. We are going to make you a price on these that wall make you want to plant 100 and you surely should do it. If you do not, you are certainly missing an opportunity Per 10, 35c; 25 for 75c; 50 for $1.50; 100 for $2.25; 500, $11.00; 1,000, $19.85.

The Latest

Varieties of Merit

New

varieties are being offered each season, we have selected the following for their exceptional merit and advise that for the price asked you cannot duplicate these values. Alice Tiplady The Queen of the Primulinus type. Large, open flowers gracefully placed on very long stems. soft coppery bronze shaded buff. In color, texture, and beauty it is unsurpassed. Plant medium tall with long, slender flower spike. Each, 10c; doz., $1.09. Anna Eberius Flowers large, slightly ruffled, of a striking magenta or plum color with deeper shading in center; no other Gladioli like it. fine spike with many flowers open, at the same time. Dwarf, of strong growth. This is a real beauty. Each, 15c; doz., $1.59. Louise The Giant Orchid-Gladioli. Largest flowered of all, the blooms measure 6 inches or more across and resemble the finest orchids. lovely and delicate shade of bright lavender, lighter toward the center a blotch of velvety maroon down the lower petal. Of dwarf growth; long, heavy spike. Blooms medium late. Each, 18c; doz., $1.70. Marshal Foch (1922) One of the sensations at the American Gladiolus Society and wherever shown at the big exhibitions. Many giant flowers open at a time on very strong stem and plant. Color of finest salmon pink. Almost self color. 12c each; per 10, $1.03; per 50, $4.00. Evelyn Kirtland Tall and stately; flowers fairly sparkling with a characteristic lustre, and joyous color tones. Rosy pink, darker at edges and dimming to shell-pink at center, brilliant scarlet blotches on lower petals. Each, 8c; per 10, 70c; per 100, $6.50. Lily r fine pure white; early, large and free. Each, 10c; per 10, 70c;



A



A



A

;





White— A

per 100, $6.50.

Gretchen Zang (Austin)

— Large,

A

winner at all sparkling blooms, of soft pink. 10, 60c; per 100, $5.50. Strong, lip and throat light yellow with a deep magenta spot. vigorous, grower. Each, 10c; per 10, 55c. George Paul Beautiful, vigorous growing dark red Each, 10c; per 10, SOc; per 100, $6.00.

Flower Shows.

Each, 10c; per

Fairfax—Solifi magenta,

MRS.

FRANK PENDLETON

.

— 1866— HOUSE OF

GURNEY, YANKTON,

S.

D.— 1925

141

Dahlias No

garden

brilliant

and

is

complete without a show of the and nothing gives

stately flowers,

greater return for so

have a

little

money

arid care.

fine large stock of the best varieties

are offering

them

We and

at very low prices;

Peony -Flowered Dahlias SVBrs.

Bowen Tufts —Alexander’s Gigantic Named expressly

Peony "-flowered Seedling..

and by permission of Mrs. Bowen Tufts of Boston and Allerton, Mass., in recognition of her for

admiration for the beautiful. This creation is the finest of my new Peony-flowered Dahlias, having gigantic, deep rosy-purple blossoms, which are produced well above the foliage upon long, graceful stems. The habit of the plant is excellent, flower stems being long and the bushes tall and exceptionally sturdy. 25c each.

Reisers Edelweiss (Peony)—Attractive pure white, long pointed petals. Each, 30c.



Salvator (Hornsveld) New Holland Peonyflowered Dahlia. Deep rose-pink blossoms, plants of medium height, and edges of petals are of a curling nature, giving the flower an entirely Each, 25c. original appearance.



Zeppelin (Hornsveld) Holland Peony-flowered Dahlia. The incomparable delicacy of this variety has excited great comment. The color is the most beautiful shade of mauve a very fascinating color. The perfection in form of this variety is one of its greatest features. Award of Merit. Very abundant flowering. Each, 30c.



Wm.

(Hornsveld) New Holland Peony-flowered very large flower that early in the season full to the center, and of a gorgeous maroonpurple. The stems are unusually good, being long and Very strong, producing the flowers well above the foliage. The best of this color to my knowledge. 45c eacfi 8

Cardinal

Patsch, Yankton County, So. Dak.

Two years ago I purchased one strup Mangels and sowed them in

pound

of Danish Sludcornfield at time of They produced such a wonderful crop of last cultivation. fine mangels that I am sowing twenty pounds this year. They gave me much more feed than rape. I believe this is a new safe use for Mangels.

my

Dahlia.

A

comes nearly



South Pole (Cannell)- A new large white variety, rivaling “Queen Wilhelmina.” It bears the blooms freely, wel[well above the foliage, on strong erect stems.

A

come addition to the Peony Aurore.

class.

35c each.

New Holland

Peony-flowered Dahlia. have secured the? finest in this

In this new importation I class in the Autumn tints.

The flowers are of very large produced on long stiff stems, well above the foliage. In color, a very deep rich orange, a shade that attracted The considerable attention at the Fall exhibitions. plants are tall and sturdy, producing their blossoms abundantly. 45c each.

I

size,

Pompons

— — $1.25. 25c each; 5 for $1.00. Kleine— Domitea orange 20c each; 5 for 90c. bronze. Amber Queen —A Golden Orange— Golden yellow. 25c each; 5 for Bonnie White rosy centre. 25c each; 5 for $1.00 Aiewine Wine color, shaded pink. 30c each; 5 for

j

buff.

fine

!

$1.00.

I

J. H. Jackson, 25c; Elsie, 25c; Spider, 30c, 4 for 90c.

—Primrose yellow.

25c each; 5 for $1.05.

Hermon Red — Deep

carmine Tipped white.

Catherine Little

1

Rose, 25c; White

Each 25c;

5 for $1.00.

Snow Clad

—White, a

free bloomer.

Each 25c; 5 for

$ 1 . 00 .

The Dahlia

Trial

Ground Mixture

Good, strong South Dakota grown bulbs producing immense flowers in every shade produced by the Dahlias. You will find in this mixture the best of the. Cactus, Show, Peony, Flowered, and all of the Dahlia family. Each, 15c; 1 doz., $1.00; 25, $2.00; 50, $3.85.

Cactus Dahlias shown in photograph son, 25c; Elsie, 25c; Rose, 25c; the four for 90e. |

J.

H. Jack-

White Spider,

30c;

CACTUS DAHLIAS

142

1

866

—HOUSE

OF GURNEY, YANKTON,

D.— 1925

S.

Bronze Beauty—Bronze. Each, 25c; 5 for $1.00. Crimson Beauty Decorative Pompon: deep crimson.

Dahlias— Continued Decorative

A

—Apricot.



good bloomer.

Each, 25c; 5 for $1.00. All —Decorative Pompon.

Darkest of Each, 60c; 5 for $2.75. puritan White, edged pink.

Nearly

Each, 35c; 5 for $1.50. Each, 30c; 5 for $1.40. American Beauty— American beauty color. Immense rosy crimson. Each, 40c; 5 for $1.75. The identical shade of the rose Jack Rose (Peacock) with the same name. A deep rich red. This va*ety is exceedingly free, carrying fairly -large flowers on very erect stems in great abundance; flowers early, and during the hot weather the color is likely to burn somewhat. Each, 20c; 5 for 90c.

Mary Garden— A large free blooming clear yellow. We have grown this variety for a number of years and consider it one of the best. Each, 25c; 5 for $1.06,

.Paul Bonyon An exceptionally fine decorative Dahlia with an unusual; blossom of gold and apricot. This has proven the best in our nursery for two years. We can recommend it to anyone. Each, 25c; 5 for $1.00. Golden West Large, heavy rich yellow. Each, 30c; 5 for $1.25. Sylvia Soft, pleasing mauve pink, changing to white in the Medium size, center; fine cut flower, good garden variety. 3 to 4 feet. Each, 25c; 5 for $1.00. Princess Juliana (Hornsveld) -Splendid Holland Decorative Dahlia. It is perfect as an exhibition flower, ideal for Holland garden decoration and unsurpassed for cutting. Dahlia specialists' claim this is the finest White Decorative Dahlia for cut-flower purposes, and also the best flowering. Received the Holland Dahlia Society’s First-Class Certificate.

florists’ use.

Satera

Castile—Yellow.



Cactus



Countess of Lonsdale This is one of the old varieties with merits lacking in many of the new varieties that have been crowded to the front. There are few varieties that will produce as many perfect large flowers as Lonsdale; it will blossom under conditions that cause many other varieties to become total failures; good stem, low compact grower, good foliage. An excellent keeper; these qualities combined with its attractive coloring make it a most profitable variety for







An excellent garden variety. Color, an exquisite shade of rich salmon with faint tinge of apricot at the base



Each, 25c; 5 for $1.00. Each, 25c; 5 for $1.00. Mrs. Henry R. Wirth A true cactus form and one of the earliest and freest blooming varieties in the collection. Color, a most intense, brilliant scarlet. Medium size, 2 to 3 feet. Each, 40c. J. H. Jackson (Vernon & Barnard) (Straight) The finest black Cactus Dahlia in existence. An exceptionally satisfactory all-around Dahlia; one of the most prominent for garden decoration, superb as a cut-flower variety and equally good as an exhibitant flower. Color, a perfectly gorgeous deep velvety blackish-maroon. Gigantic in size. Every dahlia lover should grow this variety. Each, 25c; 5 for $1.00. 2 to 3 feet.

of petals.

Elsie

Each, 25c.

—Bronze, pink

center.





Mina Burgle—This is the popular California cut flower variety; It is one of the freest flowering decorative varieties; thirty large, perfect open flowers on one plant at a time being not unusual; in color a rich luminous dark scarlet, splendid Each, 36c.

Rose

Each, 25c. -



stems.

black.

— Rosa

Mme.

A

red.

Each, 25c; 5 for $1.00*

superior variety; large.

—A

Cayeux (Cayeux)

Henri

(Straight) reliable -exhibition variety. The flowers are of the largest size with long, narrow florets, forming a bloom of magnificent form. The color is a beautiful rich pink, daintily tipped white. I highly recommend this variety as one of the best. Each, 30c.

White Spider

A

petal.

—A

most, beautiful, pure white long, narrow, twisted Each, 35c; 5 for fine for cutting.

most beautiful formation,

$1.25.

Show Dahlias stems. quilled

—Beautiful

Well formed flowers with long soft pink. Perfectly round, ball-shaped flowers, each petal being very tightly Free flowering. 35c each. in exact regularity.

A. D. Livoni

and arranged



Miss Helen Hollis. (Gigantic Scarlet Show Dahlia.) A sensational wonder and undoubtedly the largest and best deep scarlet Show Dahlia in Blossoms are on long, stiff stems, well above theioliage. Plant extremely sturdy and produces .very luxuriant foliage. This acquisition can be highly recommended. 40c each. existence.

COUNTESS OF LONSDALE CACTUS

Robert Broomfield Uncertainty

—Pure white.

Tall grower.

25c each.

A —Also known as MissandRuth and Incarnation. No two flowers are the

combination of very same. Each, 25c.

brilliant

-light shell

pink

scarlet.

—A

Vivian. (Alexander) great favorite which received the admiration everyone who saw its wonderful flowers, the color being white, effectively edged rose-violet. An extremely wonderful blending of color possessed only by the rare novelties. One of our champions and a variety worthy of the highest words of praise. 25c each. of

McKuiiough

Lizzie

—Tall

bronze show Dahlia, petals tipped red.

Stems medium long. Stands well to the head Dahlias. 25c each ; $1.00 per 5.

of the fist

among Show



Stradella A deep rich purple crimson. Perfect flowers borne in great abundance. The vigorous heavy, dark green foliage and royal purplecrimson blossoms make a very valuable addition to any garden. See cover.

Each, 25c; 5 for $1.00. Princess Victoria— Yellow show.

Excellent and dependable Dahlia,

Each, 25c.

Golden West 85c per

—Beautiful golden yellow.

Moon

Light

— Mixture of Apricot and gold. —Yellow tipped Carmine.

Lucy Foueette per

Excellent variety.

20c each;

5,

15c each; 70c per

A

beauty.

5.

15c each; 60c

5,

VIVIAN,

SHOW

— 1866

— HOUSE

Hardy

OF GURNEY, YANKTON,



Or Elephant’s Ear Very easily grown. For obtaining tropical effects in lawn and garden planting this beautiful '

plant takes a prominent place. Bright green leaves, 3 to 4 feet long and Each, 25c; per 10, $2.25. 2 feet wide.

2Y

— —

Tuberose



Orange Flowered Single This is absolutely the freest and best bloomer of all the tuberoses. The single is exceptionally fragrant and its tall spikes of star-shaped flowers are very beautiful. Each, 10c; 1® for 75c; 25 for $1.75. Albino Tuberose—Early bloomer, dwarf habit. Flowers waxy white and single. Very fragrant. Each, 10c; 10 for 75c.



Large-Flowering Ca-nnas No other bedding plant will give the same uniform good results in our varied and trying climate. They do well in all sections of the country and stand pre-eminently, at the head of the list, succeeding in any sunny position in any kind of soil, but responding quickly to liberal treatment. For best results the beds should be spaded two feet deep and a generous amount of well-decayed manure of any kind thoroughly



Popular, hardy. Lily (Hemtierocaflis) Plants belonging to the lily family. They succeed everywhere, and should be more extensively planted in our Northern States. They require little care. Among the oldest and best loved garden plants. Needs no winter protection. Blooms in July and August. Each, 20c; 5 /or 80c; 12 for $1.30.



Bay Lily (Yellow) has long, narrow leaves, promany tall stems of fragrant waxen pure yellow flowers June and July. Thrives in any good soil. Fine for borders. Each, 15c; 5 for 60c; 12 for $1.20. K wan so Orange with darker shadings.' Each, 15c; per Flava

143



Lily) Flowers very large, made broad white petals, thickly studded crimson and maroon up with a bright golden band through the center of each petal. 50c each. Speciosum Album Large white flowers with greenish band running through the center of each petal. Each, 40c. Speciosum Rubrum White, beautifully spotted with red; flowers in August. 45c each. Tiger Lily This well known old-fashioned flower is becoming very popular the last several years and is now planted On account of its extreme hardiextensively in all gardens. ness it is one of the most valuable of all lilies. Grows three feet tall with several flowers on each stem. Flowers orange with black spots. Price, each, 20c; per 5, 80c. of

Bay

D.— 1925

Caladium Esculentum

Lilies

Auratum (Gold Banded

S.

incorporated, and at all times supply water freely. For best effect plant in large masses of one color, setting out the plants 18 inches apart.

duces in



Burbank About three feet. This is really half way between orchid and truss, Cannas. The color is a pure, strong canary yellow, with some red spots in throat; a beautiful color. Lily off the Valley The lily of the Valley will thrive and The flower is often four to five inches across and they are throw up its beautiful, modest, fragrant white bells in any profuse bloomers. Each, 15c; $1.00 per doz. kind of soil. Will also adapt itself to pot culture in winter; The President The most sensational introduction of its delicate, permeating fragrance making it especially desirable. recent years. The largest flowered, most vigorous-growing red Per doz., 80c; 50 for $3.80; 100 for $7.50. Canna. The immense trusses of giant florets are produced Water Lilies (White) This is one of the common water iff great profusion. Green foliage. This variety, introduced Can be grow n in a lilies growing in the lakes of the north. only a few years ago, has proved itself worthy of a place in Each, 50c; S^ffor $2.40. lily pond or tub. every collection and every place where bold, effective performce can be appreciated; 5 feet. 20c each; 6 for $ 1 . 00 ; 12 for $1.90. Hungaria Green foliage. Planted singly or in masses, it catches the 3 instantly and demands attention. The petals are large and waxy, made into big, round, full trusses. Its color forcibly suggests the well-known ul Neyron Rose, and is unquestionably one of the most attractive pink nnas ever produced; 3M to 4 feet. 15c each; $1.00 per l6. Indiana Green leaves, orchid flowers of strong vivid orange, very ge. An exceptionally fine Canna; 5 to 6 feet tall. Each, 15c; $1.00



12, $1.50.











doz. Dr. Robert Funke It is impossible to convey the full value of this tgnificent bedding variety with its massive, erect trusses of deep, bloodflowers, and green foliage, produced with a freedom that leaves nothing be desired in effectiveness. Unqualifiedly the best deep red bedding nnas. 5 ft., 15c each; $1.50 per dozen. King Humbert The grandest Canna ever offered. Large heartiped leaves of bronze, the dark ribs sharply define, crowned with imIndividual petals are of the largest rnse heads of orchid-like flowers. e; velvety orange-scarlet-flecked carmine; rose tinted at margin and 15c each; $1.00 per 10. 4 to 4H feet. se. Mrs. Karl Kelsey A giant in growth and flowers. Immense upright ,lks of green foliage carry large trusses of handsomely fringed flowers eaked and variegated with shades of orange, scarlet, and old rose. A ijestic plant of wonderful decorative value; 6 feet. 20c each; $2.00 r doz. Wyoming Seven feet. Purple foliage. One of the most majestic nnas. Blossoms orange colored, true orchid shape, with large rounded bals that flap and flutter in the breeze like glistening silken flags. I5c ch; $1.00 per dozen. Panama Special (New) Dull red overlaid old rose, edged and >htly mottled with gold; under side of petals, creamy yellow, with a This unique “Butterfly” effect captivates avily mottled border of red. Green foliage. Each, 15c; per 12, $1.50. i ladies on sight. Wintzer’s Colossal Without doubt the largest flowered Canna to Strikingly vivid scarlet that retains its te; flowers over 8 inches across. Green foliage. Each, 15c; per dozen, $1.50. illiancy. 5 feet. variety, strong and healthy, green foliage, Gladiator A wonderful ge yellow flowers with red throat, five to six feet tall. Each, 12c; per zen, $1.00. City of Portland This variety should be in every collection. Foliage Each, 20c; ;en, flowers deep rose, extra large, height three to four feet. r



l













r 6, $1.00.

LILY OF THE VALLEY





William Saunders One of the most attractive varieties of its size; iage rich bronze, flower scarlet red, very showy, three to four feet in Each, 15c; per 6, 75c. ight. Venus Something just a little different than other varieties; foliage green, flowers pink and gold, perfectly blended, three to four feet. Each, 20c; per 6 7 $1.00.



Yellow King Humbert A sturdy grower, Immense flowers mainly very floriferous. of a rich, golden yellow spotted heavily with Bronze leaves. vermilion. 3 to 5 feet. Each, 15c; $1.00 per 10.

PLANTS REQUIRED TO FILL A CIRCULAR BED

Diameter 3 4 5 6 7

feet feet feet feet feet 8 feet 9 feet 10 feet

6 inches

12 inches

Apart 28 48 80

Apart

112 152 200 256 320

-

18 inche ‘

Apart

7

12

20 28 38 50 64 80

6 8 13 17 23

28 36

CANNA BED

1866— HOUSE OF

(44

GURNEY, YANKTON,

D.— 1925

S.

BULBS FOR FALL DELIVERY AND FALL OR WINTER PLANTING We furnish 50 at the 100 rate Single Early Tulips These are the

first

to produce flowers in the spring.

splendid varieties, you cannot one.

make a mistake

in

buying

Aii any-



Rich golden yellow, good bedder. Twelve 6c each; 50c per 10; $3.75 per 100. White with border of soft pink; a beauty. 6c each; 50c per 10; $4.00 per 100. Couleur de Cardinal! Bright crimson. Sc each; 70c per 10; $5.00 per 100. Cramoissi Brilliant Brightest scarlet. 6c each; 50c per 10; $3.75 per 100. Duchesse De Parma—Brownish red with large light orange yellow border, large flower of great substance. 6c each; 50c per 10; $4.00 per 100. Flamingo Beautiful deep rose, the best of its color. 7c each; 60c per 10; $4.25 per 100. Joost Van VondsifLady Boreel) Snow white, enormous large flower, early, grand for pots and bowls. A splendid exhibition variety and the best for bedding. 7c each; 55c per 10; $4.35 per 100. Keizerkroon A large flower crimson, scarlet edged with clear yellow. A beauty, very showy. 6c each; 50c per 10; $4.00 per 100. LaReine A beautiful early rosy white. 6c each; 50c per 10; $4.00 per 100. Moss Tresor Pure golden yellow, very large flowers. The best early yellow tulip. 7c each; 55c per 10; $4.20 per 100. Thomas SVI core— Orange red or terra-cotta, fine, shaped Splendid for early forcing agd flower, very sweet scented. bedding. 6c each; 50c per 10; $3.75 per 100. Prince of Austria A deep brownish orange. A novel color and a beauty. 6c each ; 50c per 10; $4.00 per 100. Princess Marianne White, slightly tinged rose, large flower, excellent for bedding. 7c each; 55c per 10; $4.25

Chryso&ora

inches high.

Cottage Maid

— —













per 100.



Rose Gris de Lin Deep rose and white. Excellent, good bedder and forcer. 6c each; 50c per 10; $3.25 per 100. Yellow Prince Rich golden yellow, large and showy fragrant. 6c each; 50c per 10; $4.00 per 100. White Hawk Rich early pure white. 7c each; 60c per 10; $4.25 per 100. 1 each of the above 16 varieties for 30c; 5 each of the above 16 varieties $3.50. Single Mixed Tulips—Superior mixture of the best varieties S3. 50 per 100.

— —

7

;

Darwin Tulips These are wonderful tulips, remarkably beautiful, flowers are cup shaped, large size, long strong stems and strong growth, unsurpassed for May blooming in^the garden. You will be delighted with the Darwin Tulips. In points around Yankton and north the Darwin Tulips are in full bloom xm Decoration Day when planted on the east

—Clear

rosy pink. The finest Darwin Tulip per 10; $3.50 per 100. Dream Beautiful soft uniform lilac, large flower. Height, 26 inches. 7c each; 60c per 10; $4.20 per 100. Gretchen Silvery pale rose, flushed white, inside soft pink with white center marked blue. A very beautiful flower of delicate color. 6c each; 50c per 10; $3.75 per 100. Frank Sanders Fiery rose scarlet. Best Darwin. Sc each; 70c per 10; $5.90 per 100. Massachusetts Vivid pink with white center, large flowers rf- splendid form and eolor. 8c each; Height, 26 inches. 63c per 10; $4.35 per 100. Pride of Haarlem Bright rose suffused with purple. An enormous flower of superb form and grand beauty. A stately plant for borders and among shrubs for grouping, both for glorious color and form. Height, 28 inches. 6c each; 45c per 10; $3.50 per 100. Painted Lady A very beautiful flower resembling a water Creamy-white, the center tinged soft heliotrope. 6c lily. each; 45c per 10; $3.50 per 100. The Black Tulip (La Tulip Noire)—Very large flowers of unique color: very beautiful. Height, 25 inches. 6c each; 50c per 10; $3.80 per 100. The Yellow Darwin Clear yellow, large bold flower; 6c each; 45c per 10; $3.50 per 100. height 28 inches. White Queen (La Candeur) Lovely soft white, slightly tinged blush, anthers black; a beautiful large globular erect flower. 7c each; 60c per 10; $4.00 per 100. 1 each of the above 10 varieties for 60c; 5 each of the above 10 varieties $2.25.



self color, salmon of its class. 6c each; 45c



— —









May Flowering



Breeder Tulips Most of these are purple, maroon, or terra cotta color. All ol enormous size and vigorous growth, valuable for the garden, producing by their refined colors a most artistic effect.

To be planted in the open only. Bronze Queen Soft buff,

height, 26 inches.

inside tinged golden bronze; 6c each; 50c per 10; $4.00 per 100. orange red. 8c each; 70c per 10; $5.00

Panorama—Deep per 100.

Medea

Salmon-carmine. Large flowers; very beautiful. 5c each; 45c per 10; $3.39 per 100. -White passing to rosy crimson with age. Tall handsome flower. 6c each; 50c per 10; $4.60 per 100. lane D'Oeuff Rose lilac, broadly edged yellow. 8c each; 7Sc per 10; $5.00 per 100. Height, 24 inches.

Pearl Royal



Double Tulips flowers of brilliant colors, lasting longer than single tulips, exceptionally fine for bedding. Gloria Solas Red, bordered with gold. 7c each; 60e per 10; $4.00 per 100.





La Candeur Late Flowering Double. Pure white and large. Blooms last longer than most flowers. 6c each; 50c par 10; $3.75 per 100.

Leblason— White

tinged

rose.

6c

each;

59c

per

10;

$3.75 per 100.



Lucreiia Bright pink, obvious color, very large well formed flower. 8c each; 60c per 10; $4.20 per 100. Murillo---Extra fine light pink, very large full double flowers. Below medium height. 6c each; 59c per 10; $3,75 per 100.

Rubra Maxima

— Deep

red.

6c each; 69c per 10; $4.00

per 100.



Tea Rose (Brimstone, Safrano) of Murillo, when fully developed it is

A

grand flower for per 190.

all

purposes.

Sulphur yellow sport slightly orange shaded. 7c each; 55c per 19; $4.90



Imperator Rubrorm Scarlet, very fancy. 7c each; 55c per 10; $4,35 per 100. Titian Brown and yellow. 6c each; 60c per 10; $4.00 per 100. Vuurbaak Fine scarlet with orange flush. Early. 7c each; 60c per 10; $5.00 per 100. 1 each of the above 10 varieties 60c; 5 each for $2.20.





Parrot Tulips

Tulips (for Fall)

Exceptionally fine late flowering variety. We are offering the best variety of all the late flowering varieties of Tulips. The Blushing Bride Carmine rose shaded with cream white and suffused silvery white and rose on the petals. Per 5, 40c; per 10, 65c; per 100, $5.00. Moonlight Extremely large flower, sulphur yellow. Very Per 5, 40c; per 10, 65c; per 100, $5.00. beautiful



Scarlet Mammoth This is undoubtedly one of the finest bedding varieties. Very robust, erect, bears fine formed flowers of enormous size. Is of the brightest scarlet Per 5, 40c; per 10, 65c; per 100, $5,00.

Have enormous Peony-like

or north side of buildings.

Clara Butt

SINGLE EARLY TULIPS (FOR FALL)

(for fall

A

shipment)

remarkable strain of rare formed Tulips, which have thorns and pustules on their petals. Very charmant flowers for planting in open only. Admiral de Constantinople Large orange red. 7c each; 55c per 10; $4.00 per 100, Markgraaf Inside rich orange, outside scarlet and yellow feathered. 8c each; 60c per 10; $5.00 per 100,





1866—-HOUSE OF

GURNEY, YANKTON,

among spring’s earliest flowers, and there is no reason why we should not partake of the pleasures they bring with the first warm days of spring. The Narcissi grow in

Narcissi are

almost any location, doing well in sunny or shady places,

They continue to bloom it matters not if wet or dry. year after year, increasing in size and effectiveness. They are valuable to place in the border of perennials or shrubbery, where they can be left undisturbed, and for naturalizing in the For forcing, treat the same as tulips, planting them in grass. pots. The flowers assume many forms, and present charming combinations of white, gold, orange, sulphur and pure yellow. and



Von Sion This is the famous old Dutch Daffodil. The flowers are double and of a beautiful golden yellow. Excellent for forcing and also for planting with hyacinths, as they bloom about the same time. Each, 7c; per doz., 60c; per 100, $4.50; postpaid.

—Large

Large yellow trumpet with a beautiful snow-white perianth. The combination of yellow Fine for bouquets. beauty. and white makes a flower of rare Each, 7c; per doz., 60c; per 100, $4.25,

Empress

and hardy.

—One

of the largest and finest among Narcissi has a pure yellow trumpet of immense size and a wide perianth of deep primrose. Hardy and .of great beauty when cut. Each, 7c; per doz., 70c; per 100, $4.00.

Emperor

or Daffodils.

It

Lucifer

—-Large

handsome”white perianth.

Each, 7c; p~r

doz,, 70c.

— 1925

We

only single varieties because these are the hardiest

list

Madame De

Graaf



Large sulphur white trumpet. Each, 10c; per doz., $1.00.

Pure



Alba Plena Odorata (Double Poeticus) Double, pure Very sweet scented. white flowers resembling a Gardenia. Succeeds best when planted in a cdjbl, moist situation with rather heavy soil. Each, 10c; per doz., $1.00. Poeticus Ornatus

— The

early-flowering Poeticus.

Large

Fragrant, white flowers with saffron cup margined scarlet. with a rich, spicy odor, and excellent for forcing as well as outdoor planting. Each, 8c; per 6, 35c; per doz., 60c.

(for Fall

Shipment)



Prince of Orange





Dark rose, early. La Victoire Brilliant red. King of Blues A deep blue, single. Hyacinth prices: Each, 15c; 2 for 25c; 5





Freesias (for Fall) The Freesias are greatly prized for their delightful fragrance and delicate colored flowers. They make an excellent cut flower. Excellent for window culture, not hardy and for house planting only. These do not need to be handled for pot blooming as directions for other bulbs. Postpaid, 10 for 35c;

Chinese Sacred Lily (for Fall) The most

satisfactory indoor winter blooming bulb. This grows easily and rapidly. Plant in a bowl of water with enough pebbles or sand to hold in position. Flowers in just a few Flowers waxy white, very fragrant weeks after planting. and numerous. Some bulbs will produce as many as 100 flowers. You will agree with me that it is the cheapest and most satisfactory winter flower. Each,;25c; 3 for 65c postage paid; 10 for $1.8Q postpaid.

Crocus

(for Fall)

The earliest to blossom in the spring; beautiful, lifting their heads almost before the snow has disappeared. Absolutely hardy for outdoor culture, and may be used for pot culture. They may be planted in the meadow, lawns, under trees; in Do not cut their foliage fact, they will do most anywhere. it

dies

down.

Purpurea Grandiflora

—Extra



Paper-White Grandiflora The most popular Narcissus for growing in the house in pebbles and Produces clusters of pure white, fragrant, fctar-shaped flowers in three or four weeks after starting. Each, 8c; per 6, 35c; per doz., 65c. Ijivater.



Soleil d'Or Similar to Paper-White Grandiflora, put the flowers are rich yellow with deep reddish cups. Each, 10c; per 6, 38c; per doz., 70c.

Jonquils (for Fall Shipment) These are very popular on account

of their beauty, They are their fragrance, and the ease of cultivation. handled like Narcissi and can be planted either outdoors or in the house. The Jonquil is perfectly hardy Bind will last for years after once planting. They also pnake a good plant for house or window box. By Ipotting early a succession of these lovely flowers can be load throughout the entire Winter.

Single Jonquils

— Beautiful

Each, 6c; per

Double Jonquils

Ijleep

her

rich 6, 30c;

yeilow flowers; per doz., 55c,



Heads of small but very double yellow flowers, powerfully scented. Each, 6c; 40c; per doz., 70e,

6,

purple.

10 for 30c; 100

Mont Blanc — Pure white. 10 for 30c; 100 Large Yellow— 10 for 30c; 1G0 for $2,00.

.

f

for 70c; 10 for

$ 1 . 20 ,

for $2.00,

The Polyanthus or Bunch-flowered Narcissi are not only beautiful but exceedingly fragrant, and may be grown in bowls or glasses, under the same treatment as for Also suitable for window the Chinese Sacred jLily. (garden They are very fragrant. Paper -White jGrandiflora is the best variety. When grown in bowls bulbs in the it is a good idea to plant 5 or 6 powl with enough gravel or rocks to hold them in an position. bowl full of water and upright Keep the place near a window where they wall get plenty of light and sun, and they will bloom in a very short time. By [planting these bulbs at intervals of a week or two apart [you can have beautiful flowers for your home all during [the Winter months at a very small expense.

ery fragrant.

are also

beautiful single hyacinth of pure white. Gertrude A delightful rosy pink (bright pink). King of the Yellows —The best pure yellow. Queen of the Blues A light blue.

until

Polyanthus Narcissi

-

They

L'lnnocence— A

25 for 60c.

white perianth.

|

(for Fall)

and most sure to produce satisfactory blooms. more suited to amateur indoor culture.



SnowPoefticus Pheasant’s Eye (The Poet's Narcissus) white flowers with beautiful orange cup edged with bright Fragrant, Cannot be forced; for outside plantcrimson. Each, 7c; per 6, 37c; per doz., 70c. ing.

!

145

Selected bulbs especially desirable for forcing or pot culture, but may be planted in the garden. Each bulb will bloom producing a very large flower spike. House culture; the large bulbs should be planted in not less than a four-inch pot in good rich soil mixed with onethird sand. If possible put the pots in a bed in the garden, covering with a board to prevent breaking pots when taking up, covering eight to ten inches with soil. If weather turns cold, ewer with straw to keep from freezing. Pots should be left in the ground six or eight weeks and taken up at intervals to have plants blooming all winter. They can also be put away in the cellar for six to eight weeks with equal good results. After the plants are through blooming the bulbs should be planted in the garden as soon as the frost is out of the ground.



Immense flowers with Sir Watkin (incomparabilis) sulphur-yellow petals and trumpet of a slightly deeper shade edged with scarlet. One of the best of this class. Each, 7c; per doz,, 70c.

D.

Dutch Hyacinths

Narcissi and Daffodils (for Fall Shipment) The

S.

NARCISSI

for $2.00,

18 66—

HOUSE OF GURNEY, YANKTON,

S.

D.

— 1925

Wi

aa<

p

P

guaranteed implelight, quick and interesting, and get a bigger yield. Planet Jr. the work of your family garden experience. ments are backed by over 40 years’

Make

No. 25 Planet

1 Planet Jr. Combined Drill Seeder and Wheel Hoe, Cultivator and Plow.

No.

Combined

Ho.

Jr.

and Drill Seeder, Double Wheel Hoe, Cultivator and Plow. Hill

Price, complete,

$14.50

$21.50 2*/2 qts.

Sows all garden seeds from smallest up to peas and beans.

The No.

1

machine

double-wheel hoe. and money-saver.

is

It is

excellent seed sower; a first-class a practical, every-day time, labor

an

No. 4 Planet Jr. bined Hill and

Com-

This combination is intended for gardeners who have a large enough acreage in crops for a double wheel hoe and prefer not to buy seeders and wheel hoes separately, and for the family garden where a double wheel hoe is preferred. As a seeder it is practically the same as the Planet Jr. No. 4, and as a wheel hoe has the same steel frames and cultivating attachments as the Planet Jr. No. 12 Double Wheel Hoe.

I

Drill

No. 31 Planet

Jr.

Com-

bined Drill Seeder and Single Wheel Hoe, Cultivator

and Plow Price $12.50

No. 3 ID as a Drill Seeder Only Price $9.50

Accurate, durable and easy-running; sows all garden seeds from the smallest up to peas and beans in hills 4, 6, 8, 12 or 24 inches apart, or in drills at the proper thickness and depth; rolling down and marking out the next row all at one passage. No time is lost. No seed is wasted. By removing the seeder parts and substituting ,the tool frame, you have a first-class single wheel hoe, with a set of specially hardened steel tools. Used by men, women or boys. Pays for itself in a season; _

This new combined tool is of great value to thousands of gardeners who have never felt able to own, either a seed drill or a wheel hoe. It will sow a small packet of garden seed with great precision in a narrow row from 34 to 2 inches deep. Quickly changed to a splendid wheel hoe. A special machine for the small gardener at a price he can afford to pay.

lasts for years.

Planet

Jr.

Star Pulverizer, Leveler and

Weeder

Price $6.15 This new tool is especially adapted for preparing the seed bed, smoothing and fini ng the surface of the soil and. putting it in the best possible condition for the seed planter. The real blade cutting 1334 inches, levels the ground perfectly. After the crops are started, it may be used between the row's as a weeder or as a crust breaker, leaving a fine mulch.

No. 35. Ever since the wheel hoe replaced the hand hoe in the kitchen garden there has been an insistent demand for a small seeder that could be attached to the wheel hoe. The amateur gardener did not

always feel justified in buying a complete seed drill. We are now prepared to furnish the seeding attachment shown here which can be attached to any Planet Jr. Single or Double Wheel Hoe or Garden Plow, with the exception of No. 33 Single Wheel Hoe, and Fire Fly Plow. Remember this attachment does not replace our regular line of seeders it is Planet intended for the small kitchen garden where the rows are usually short. Everyone raising his own table vegetables should have this attachment.



Jr.

Seeder Attachment for Wheel

and Garden Plows

He

— HOUSE

1866

OF GURNEY, YANKTON,

No. 12 Planet Jr. Double and Wheel Hoe, Cultivator and Plow

M

Price, $11.00

No. 12 V?— Same, except Pair 3-Prong Cultivator Teeth in place of Single Teeth;

/ar

-

Price, $11.00.

S.

D.

— 1925 No. 119 Planet Garden Plow

Single

'

^

-

147 Jr,

Price, $4.75 Steel Wheel

24-inch

/W

/W Aj/ JW /w

No, 13—Price, $7.75 with knives only .

.

No. 119—This tool will appeal to those who prefer a high wheel tool for their garden work. Where the soil has not been so thoroughly and carefully prepared, the high wheel undoubtedly makes an easy running tool.

% No. 3, with 6-inch hoes only, these being the tools that are most used. Any .of- the attachments shown with No. 12 or 12 H thay' be added at- any .time. A double and single wheel hoe in one. Has steel frame, and li-inch steel wheels. Straddles crops till 20 inches high, then can :be worked 1p;et.ween,j:6ws with ;one or two -wheels. The hoes are wonderful weed kilters' And leave the ground almost level. The cultivator teeth are of improved design and admirable for deep work. The plows are invaluable for opening furrows for manure, etc.; for covering and for plowing to or from the crop. The leaf lifters enable close work when plants are large or leaves are flat on the ground. •

No. 16 Planet

No. 8 Planet bined Horse Cultivator

Jr. ComHoe and

Price, $17.00 No. 9— without wheeL Price $15.00

||

^

jtftr

Jr. Single

Wheel Hoe, Cultivator, 6-

Rake and Plow

—Same

as No. 16, except it has no rakes. Price,

No. 17

7-

$7.75

.

k

No.

19—Single Wheel

Price, $5.50 15-Inch Steel

Hoe.

Wheel

No other cultivating machine is so widely known, for it is in use throughout the civilized world. So strongly built as to withstand incredible strain, yet light and easy to handle. Opens and closes furrows, hoes right up to the plants without danger of injury, throws dirt to or from the row and throws back from center again. Adjusts for any width.

No. 90 Planet

Jr.

Twelve-Tooth Harrow,

Cultivator and Pulverizer Complete with Steel Wheel.

«

A

Price $17.00

No. 90D (without Pulverizer),



Price $14.00

m

These Single Wheel Hoes are the highest They have a great variety of attachments v. to a large variety of work, and there is sea cultivation they will not do.

PLANET

JR.

EXTRAS

4h2~hich Hoes, complete, S100 ihch Hoes, complete, $101 inch Hoes, complete, C. & D1 Sfeel Cultivator Teeth and Bolt

chisel-shaped teeth on this tool go as deep or shallow like, close to row, without injuring plants, cut out all stir the soil and mellow and fine it as with a garden rake. Any width from 12 to 32 inches. A special favorite with strawberry growers, market gardeners, truckers and small fruit growers.

The

as

Plows for Double Wheel Hoe Plow for Single Wheel Hoe I Three-Prong Cultivator Teeth.. j

!

I

you

weeds,

Disc Hofes Rakes, 3-tooth

Rakes, 5-tooth 1

72-Page Planet

Jr.

Catalogue Free

Describes 70 tools, including Seeders, Whe Horse Hoes, Harrows, Orchard and Best Cu Write a postal for it.

I)i oripi f r^ld.IlcL

T r flracQ VJldab Jl.

Edger „

.

,

.

.

Excellent for trimming along side walks and around Each, $1.85 flower beds. postpaid.

extremely simple, and works much than other styles. Plants anything from cane to corn. The handiPrice, $2.40; est tool on the place. pos tpaid, $2.65= easier

The Cyclone Seed Sower This is the best knapsack broadcast grain and seed sower made, and any person sowing any kind of grain or grass seed will more than save the cost of it on a very few acres besides sowing the seed much more evenly than they possibly can by hand. Order one to come with your grass seed. Price each, $2.25; postpaid, $2,55.

1866

148

-HOUSE OF GURNEY, YANKTON,

S.

ULL-EASU Kr Vi ,

„|

i

mini*

D.— 1925 Adjustable

Garden Cultivators

Cultivator Hoe,

keen edged*high carbon tool steel weed cutter 9 ^ Also has a inches wide. Under most conditions both cultivator and weed cutter can be used at the same time. The cultivator can be quickly detached, put on a hoe handle and used as a hand tool. The wheel is 14 inches in diameter plow style. 13 lbs. Price $4.00 each. Parcel post paid, $4.50.



Junior Cultivators, No.

PEJ1 and PEJ4

Combines the convenience of the popular 5-prong style with the additional advantage of the great PULL-EASY adjustable feature. Teeth are 9 inches long and very broad and These long grasping teeth will cultivate deeper an strong. more thoroughly than any other garden tool. 4 ft. straight-grained ash handle. Price, $1.30 each. Parcels post paid, $1.45. :

With a short 1 ft. handle (No. PEJ1) is for careful close work in flower beds or around bushes and low-spreading The same 4-tooth cultivator head on a 4-foot* maple .plants. handle (No. PEJ4). PEJ1, 55c each. 65c and 80c.

PEJ4, 70c each.

PE

No.

Cultivator Rake, No.

PEC

Parcels postpaid,

Pruning Shear, California Pattern

Very good quality. At this low price you cannot afford to be without a pair. Price, $1.00 parcel postpaid. French pattern, American made. These are highly finished, made of the very best material and will last a.life time. They Each, $3.00, postare the kind we use in our own nurseries. age paid.

At full width of 18 inches is better than an ordinary rake for preparing the seed bed, because of sturdy, long teeth. When vegetables are small the middle tooth is quickly removed for straddling plants and working two rows at once. Teeth 3 inches long. Parcels post paid, $1.60. Price, $1.40 each.

BEICBASD'j COMBINATION SPRI NO-T00TH

Magic Weeder Hoes

Grass makes the lawn; dandelions are only disfigurements. Granting that the dandelion possesses beauty flowers should be in the flower beds. The Hall Dandelion Puller is an absolute guarantee to a fine lawn. It leaves no bad looking hole It saves the lawn because it gets the root. The trowel-shaped blade slides into the ground to mark your work. while a patented prong catches the root. When it is pulled up you are done with that particular dandelion and its progeny. The root comes



with

it.

55c parcels post paid.

Magic Weeder Hoe The Magic Weeder Hoe is the best garden hand-weeder we have ever used. Each tooth works separately on springs and is sure death to thenveed. size E, EOc;

Prices, Size A, 20c; size B, 25c; size C, 35c; size D, 45c; size F, 65c; size G, 85c; size i-f, $1.00; size K, $1.05.

Postpaid.

Garden Trowel



Style G Hardwood handle; 6-ineh steel blade. 30c, postpaid.

Price,

1866— HOUSE OF GURNEY,

YANKTON,

S.

— 1925

D.

149

Close hand cultivation is best, and “Norcross” Cultivator Hoes and Weeders are like a human hand. The “Norcross” is the only .Cultivator-Hoe with detachable handle ferrule (Fat’d), which provides for its use as a wheel plow attachment. Professional gardeners declare that no wheel plow on the market has an attachment equal to our Cultivator-Hoe. All prongs are detachable. Price, 5 prong, $1.25; 3 prong, 90c each; midget, 45c each. Attachment for wheel hoe, :

10c each.

Parcels postpaid.

Hand Weeders

—Lang’s $0.25



Plant Bands The Locked kind, water and weather proof. In we do so with confidence in their value to the planter, whether a. gardener using thousands or the fellow who uses but a small quantity. Sow the seed in seed bed in the usual way, when ready to transplant, prick in, one plant to each “ready to plant” band and when ready for the open you have a perfectly developed root system in a compact space, held in place by the band. They do not know they have been offering these

you are

Good

transplanted.

for early melons, vegetable

and flowering

plants.

These square bands take 25 per cent less space than round flower pots. Size 2 by 2 inches. Price, per 50, 45c; per 100, 70c; per 250, $1,10; per 1,000, $3,00; per 5,000, $13,50, Frost Protector

much

to the

home

frost protector,

—The

or

protection of plants from late frosts means market gardener, we are offering a very -desirable can be used many seasons at

easily handled, durable,

50 tor $2,60: 100 for $4,00; 1,000 for $33,00,

From Mrs, ©!e Walders, Henning, Minn, I sent to your Company for my seed and I

believe every one grew.

You

sent free seed with the regular order and I planted a sandy knoll. I know if I had planted them on-

pumpkin seed on they would have

weighed more than a hundred pounds. The one in thepicture weighs fil pounds. The onions shown in the picture weigh one pound each. I shall always send to the Gurney Seed Com-

pany

my

for

seeds

and

trees.

Rain King Sprinkler Control the rain on your lawn and garden with the rain king, it works forward, back-



TEN WAYS

RAIN

wards, outside, inside,

up or down, and the beauty of it is, it works all them when you turn on the pressure, covers a space from 8 to 70 feet in diameter as you desire, waters in the little corners, or along the sidewalks or next to your neighbors wash on the line without danger of its slopping over, all brass except the base, never clogs, always By parcel post, prepaid, $3,70, ready. Saucy Sprey Sprinkler For an inexpensive “honest to goodness” little lawn and garden sprinkler, this one has all the rest beaten to a frazzle, you just attach the insignificant looking little thing to the end of the hose and then look out if the small boy is waiting to turn on the w ater, because he Each, postpaid, 85c. the minute you see it in operation.



RAIN KING

r

is

You will love this little midget

going to get you



Makes Much Rain In a small space of time and over a large piece of ground, this is the ideal for large grounds, either lawn or garden. have just put this system in to cover Sight acres over 5 the seed beds and the little evergreens, cuttings and very small plants that they may have moisture to order until they become established. Did you ever watch your lawn or garden dry up and wither just at the season you had hoped for most from it, had plenty of water but lacked a satisfactory system of applying

We

| 5

I have looked them all over and this one will do the work, waters a space with ordinary pressure 50 by 18 feet, can be moved

it.

from one location to another in a moment and spreads water at the rate of one inch each nine hours. Furnished complete ready to operate for $ 11 00 . .

Garden Line crooked to the

—one

—From straight

the

row

wrote me that the garden line

woman

3^^

using her rows were so straight that was painful, most of us would never have a pain from straight rows in the garden the way we RAIN have been planting them, so let’s I furnish this durable article with 100 feet of line for 85c after

it

MAKES MUCH |get that straight pain this year.

postpaid.

Hermanson, Winnebago County, Iowa. Nov, 6, 1924. ordered nursery stock from four different houses this spring and can truthfully say that what I got from you was the nicest stock and reached me in the best condition, due to cafeful backing. Mrs.

J. E,

fagged |

I

GARDEN LINE REEL

1866

150

-HOUSE OF GURNEY, YANKTON,

S.

D,— 1925

Prices on Sprayers Can be used with spray

any

pump or nozzles you

now

have, or with our Barrel Sprayer. Adjustable for rows from two feet eight to four The guide irons feet apart. can be fastened to any wagon or cart by a couple of bolts and removed in a moment. Can be raised. This attachment. will save many times One its cost the first season. man can (Save and do the pumping and spray 30 acres of potatoes, per day.

Price of complete outfit with 4 solid brass nozzles,

2

caps for each nozzle, $15.00.

Hudson’s Perfection An

exceptionally well made- sprayer, top head concave, ‘bottom convex, all seams riveted and soldered. A practically unbreakable outfit which has no equal for potato spraying, whitewashing or general use. Will handle perfectly all liquids, either thin or heavy. -

Pump

of seamless brass tubing.

Nozzle is our regular Perfection Shutoff Nozzle, which will operate Price, with Galv. Tank, $7.00; with perfectly at all times.

Brass Tank, $9.50

Hudson’s Barrel

Pump

This pump has been developed to meet every requirement of a perpendicular barrel pump. It is powerful, light and durable, and will develop better than 250 pounds pressure with ease. Can be used with either one or two lines of hose. Barrel is not furnished. Cylinder of seamless brass, 1 %x7 inches, with 8-inch stroke. Air chamber, 2x30 inches of high carbon steel; valves are bronze balls, fitted with brass intake screen. Swinging type agitator, very efficient.

HUDSON

No 4A.—Outfit, No.

o BAKKiiL, PUJVlt' uozz

-

]

e)

plete.

4 pump, 15-ft., 1^-in. spray hose, fog leaklessjshutoff and an 8-ft. J^-in. iron pipe extension comPrice Each, $14.00,

Tree Protectors

My

improved Tree Protectors are made from wood veneer, 10 inches wide by 20 inches long, are soaked at the lower end in creosote, which preserves the wood coming in contact with the ground. Their advantages are: The prevention of injury from rabbits and mice; from borers, insect pests, hot blistering sun and winter blasts; from injury against the whiffle-tree when cultivating the orchard; against sun scalds. Trees thus protected will not become hide-bound; it will prevent the bark from bursting open on young trees in extreme cold weather. I will furnish this protector for 2y2 c each, $2.00 per 100, not prepaid.



Saucy Spray Sprinkler For an inexpensive “honest to goodness” little lawn and garden sprinkler, this one has all the rest beaten to a frazzle. You just attach the insignificant looking thing to the end of the hose and then look out if the small boy is waiting at the other end to start things, because he is going to get you sure. You will love this midget as soon as you see it in operation.’ Each, postpaid, 85c.



Potato Planter Get away from the back-breaking way with the hoe, get one of these and do three times as much work alone as two will the old way. It plants them right depth, and places the potato, not in the dust but in the moist earth where it belongs. This is not meant for the Potato Farmer with many acres but for the home garden and where the acreage is not enough to warrant a horse planter, you will be more than pleased with your investment. Price, $2.55; postpaid, $2.80.

IVIrs. C. E. Kline Our Beta grapes purchased from you, 'covering the back garden fence, and our, fine four grandsons in

front.

The grapes

are nearly ripe

in anticipation.

and the boys are smiling

The boys from

left

Marion, Clement, Darrell and Kerrnit.

to right aTe

.

1866— HOUSE OF GURNEY,

YANKTON,

D.

S.

— 1925

INSURES SUCCESS

NlTRAGlN

I





looeolftof.

NlTRAGlN

WITH LEGUMES

Kettores.

No Weeds

Carries For Alfalfa, Clovers, Vetches, Cowpeas, Soybeans, Peas, Beans the Soil Stimulates Growth

151

and Maintain* Sou

or Plant Diseases-

-

fertility

Enriches

“NlTRAGlN" INCREASES YIELD — MAKES FERTILE SOIL Don’t Sow Legume Seed Without Inoculation “Nitragin” is the trade name of the germ that acts on the legume root, drawing nitrogen from the airs a,nd converting As a result it insures a uniform “catch” it into plant food. quickly growing a strong, healthy, hardy plant. At the same

time the soil is enriched for the nourishment of the succeeding crop. But remember, only legumes inoculated with a good reliable culture, such as “Nitragin,” will do this. Use “Nitra-

gin” on

all

Make your

legumes.

farin fertile.



Inoculate Seed With “Nitragin” Get a Bumper Crop In, order to get a bumper crop your farm must be fertile. Your farm cannot be fertile unless you Can grow legumes successfully; to get a “catch,” to insure an even stand, you must in a great many cases use a good, pure culture, such as “Nitragin.” The pure culture system of inoculating legumes is endorsed by the U. S. Dept, of Agriculture, by experiment The leading stations, by agricultural experts, and by farmers who have used “Nitragin.” Science seed firms through the country are also endorsing pure culture for all legumes. find certain crops must certain bacteria that in the proven soil or they will has definitely prove. a disappointment or a failure. If you have failed to secure a “catch” it’s because there is something lacking in the soil. The problem in a. great many cases has been solved/ Be sure to state crop for which that it lacks bacteria sufficient to insure a “catch.” “Nitragin” i? intended.

PRICES— ANY CULTURE bushel size. For 34 bushel seed Vi bushel size. For 3 bushel seed For 1 bushel seed 1 bushel size. 2 bushels size. For 2 bushels seed 5 bushels size. For 5 bushels seed Be sure to state what crop the “NITRAGIN”

$0.35 ,50

•>

You

can also get the special

90 1.65 4.00 is

to be used for.

GARDEN “NITRAGIN,”

which

good for Peas, Beans

and Sweet Peas, and large enough for the average garden. GARDEN 25c, postpaid. Include “NITRAGIN” with your seed order

Clipper Mills

“NITRAGIN”

is

shipped to

you by mail or express is

—No.

“NITRAGIN”

— Mention

IB, No.



in a ventilated can in a granular medium, in which the germs will live for a

long time.

crop you want

it

for

2B

The Clipper

Mill is a great machine. This mill has revolutionized It the cleaning, grading, and separating of corn, grains and seeds. will grade, clean, and separate all of these items more rapidly, perIt is better built and more durable than fectly and satisfactorily. any other fanning mill. It. screens out all of the dUst, fine particles of dirt, chaff, etc., before it goes over the fan, consequently, there It is easy to operate and of a very great is less dust in operating. capacity. The Hopper for the cleaned grain or seed holds five bushels, most other machines require separate baskets or boxes in which to catch the grain. Every person who has once used a Clipper Grain or Seed Cleaner would never discard it for any other make. venture to say that 99 per cent of the Seed Houses of the World use Clipper Mills for their main cleaning. If there was a better mill made than the Clipper the Seed Houses would of necessity have them. The fact that the Seed Houses of the world use the Clipper we conThese mills can be sider the greatest recommend for this mill. operated by hand or power. Each mill, if you request it, will be equipped without additional charge, with a power pulley. Each mill is equipped with twelve screens suitable for cleaning, grading and separating all kinds of grain and seed, and seed corn. These screens are very durable as they are made of perforated zinc steel. The capacity of the No. 1 B is 40 bushels of market wheat per hour, 12 bushels of clover seed per hour. No other mill will handle near this quantity. Every Clipper mill is guaranteed both as to material and workmanship and is also guaranteed to excel all other seed and grain cleaners on the market- It is guaranteed to us by the manufacturer and that guarantee is reinforced by our guarantee; in fact, we guarantee this mill to grade, clean, and separate any grain or seed that is not impossible It will not separate one grain from another to separate. Now, whatever a man soweth, that shall he also reap, or in where the weight and size are the same, but if there is other words, if you sow weed seeds or poor seed, you are bound a difference in weight or size it will make a perfect separation to reap that of like quality, and kinds. The Clipper screens It is the best mill for grading seed corn and each mill is equipped If are sd arranged as to be in plain view and of easy access to [with special seed grading screens for edge drop planters. the operator while the machine is in operation. It is endorsed [you will grade your seed grains each season you will increase and used by. State and Government Stations. [your yield, inside of five years, from five to twenty per cent.

We

No. 1-B $32.50

Announcement Extraordinary

This mill sells everywhere without corn grading screens, We will include the jor equipped with ten screens for $34.50. lextra corn grading screens, or twelve screens for $32.50. The (No. 2 B mill, of nearly twice the capacity, operated by hand We will include Free with each [or power as you wish, $41.00. mill a Power Pulley. Prices are F. O. B. Factory, quick shipment. !

No. No.

No. 2-B $41.00 EXTRA SCREENS, Any Size, Postage Paid 1— Old Style, each $1.50 No. 2— Old Style, each $1.75 1-B— New model

each.

Be

1.50

No. 2-B— New Model 1.75 each

sure to state whether old or

new model.

GUARANTEE We have sold many carloads of the Clippers under a guaranSatisfaction to the purchaser or the mill to be returned to us at our expense and money would be returned. Less than ten mills have been returned to us in as many years and ithose invariably before we were given a chance to give spe'-hd instructions for its operation. This mill will do better work

Itee of

than any other

mill. It will not do the impossible, but should you find that you are unable to satisfactorily clean or separate any grain or seed, send us a sample and we will give you prompt and full instructions. Easy to operate, perfect in its work,

from other mil’s as before going through the blast.

loKH dust .than

all

dust .and trash are scalped

1866— HOUSE

152

Which Chickens

OF GURNEY, YANKTON, of

are offering are from such cockerels as uce you some wonderful show-birds, as rs obtainable^

Silver Laced Wyandottes Laced Wyandotte is the oldest

Silver

They

are also a very popular American breed, are good winter layers and excellent table

They stand confinement well, yet good foragers. They have a beauti-

fowls.

are plumage, a rose comb, bright red wattles and ear lobes, yellow beak and ful

legs; brown-colored egg. Standard weight cock,_ 834 pounds; hen, 634 pounds; cockerel, 734 pounds; pullet, 534 pounds.



Single

Comb Brown

by rather small

fine broilers. Properly cared for, they will weigh two pounds when eight weeks old. Like all the Leghorns, they are poor sitters, but most prolific layers.

Comb Rhode

^ R T.J Comb Buff Orpingtons

Barred Plymouth

Rocks Barred Rock

is

the most widely



known

as a general purpose fowl a breed which has proved its value as a market fowl

and egg producer. The plumage is grayish white, each feather being crossed by regular narrow parallel sharply defined bars, that stop short of positive black. The comb, wattles and ear lobes are red, the beak and legs yellow; browncolored eggs. Standard weight; cock; 934 pounds; hen, 734 pounds; cockerel, 8 pounds; pullet, 6 pounds.

-

yellow legs, white ear lobes, great activity and spright-

make

*

head; top oval in shape, covered with small points, terminating in a small spike at the rear. Standard weight: cock, 834 pounds; hen, 634 pounds; cockerel, 734 pounds; pullet, 5 pounds.

Leghorns

Specialty?

you are

Island Reds The only difference between the Rose and Single Comb Reds is in the comb. The rose comb is low and firm on the

size,

liness. All varieties are hardy and prolific. They are small eaters and grand layers of white eggs. The Brown Leghorns will always be a favorite with many people. They develop rapidly and

If

Rose and Single

Leghorns comprise a group characterized

D,— 1925

ParceSs Post Charges Prepaid by Us, in the market for eggs, cockerels or p any chickens shown, write for prices. "

3

variety of the Wyandottes.

S.

The Ones Below Are Your

Single

Orpingtons are of English origin, and

from their first introduction have steadily grown in favor until they are the most popular birds today ever originated on English soil. Their large size, early maand winter production of large brown eggs have won for them a reputation in all parts? of the world. Standard weight: cock, 10 pounds; hen, 8 pounds; cockerel, 834 pounds; pullet, 7 pounds. turity



--

.

.

v

' /

'

Single Comb White Leghorns White Leghorns are acknowledged

to-

be the greatest producers of large white eggs. Nearly all of the big egg farms are stocked with them. For the amount of feed they consume, no other breed can show so good returns. The males are alert and strikingly erect in carriage; the females show very little tendency to broodiness and lay continuously. Our speciality.

OUR GUARANTEE We guarantee to prepay parcel post charges on day old chicks to any part of the United States. We guarantee 97%

live arrival.

With

the facilities of this large hatchery, ^it makes it possible for us to deliver these to you at a lower price than you can hatch them yourselves, and gives you the best laying and table strain.

White Plymouth Rocks

White Wyandottes Next to the Barred Plymouth Rock, the White Wyandottes Are probably the most popular of all varieties of fancy poultry. They are used on lots of laTge plants; make excellent broilers. Are a fine winter layer, make good mothers, mature quickly, have a rose comb, oright red wattles and ear lobes, yellow beak and legs and pure white plumage. In shape they are all curves; brown-colored egg. Standard weight: cock, &¥> pounds; hen, 634 pounds; cockerel, 734 pounds; pullet, 534 pounds.

White Rock has the same shape and build as* the Barred Their snow- white, plumage with yellow legs and red attract attention anywhere. Are good layers are a splendid breed for broilers, and as capons cannot be beaten; have been brought to a high degree of perfection by our most famous breeder, whose strain we offer for sale; brown-colored Rock.

comb

;

Standard weight; cock, 934 pounds; hen, 734 pounds; eggs. cockerel, 8 pounds; pullet, 6 pounds.

1866— HOUSE OF GURNEY, YANKTON,

Prompt, Safe Deliv

D.— 1925

S.

loo

Guaranteed

Baby

Leading Varieties of Heavy Egg Producers Why People Buy

Day-Old Chicks

Because the dangers, worries and inconveniences of hatching your own Baby Chicks are over and that you can buy Gurney Quality Baby Chicks cheaper than you can hatch them yourself.

You change an uncertain problem of hatching into one of certainty, by buying your Baby Chicks. You eliminate poor hatches, dangerous fires from lamp incubators and have only the brooding period. You are insured of at least 97 per cent hatch instead of part of the chicks you counted on hatching. No work, worry or disappointment. No longer does anyone question the great advantage of buying day-old chicks. Each hatching season there are hundreds of thousands of baby chicks sold in the cities and millions shipped to the small towns and country people in every state. Buying baby chicks is a real saving of both time and money.

Time

We

Start to Ship

Exhibition Quality Chicks—Price List 25 50 100 500 1000 VARIETY Chicks Chicks Chicks Chicks Chicks Barred Plymouth Rock. $5.00 $ 9.50 $18.00 $85.00 $160.00 White Plymouth Rock... 6.00 11.00 20.00 95.00 180.00

White Wyandotte 6.00 Silver Laced Wyandotte. 6.00 R. C. Rhode Island Red S. C. Rhode Island Red. S. C. Buff Orpington S. C. Brown Leghorn.... S. C. White Leghorn .... .

.

start to ship as soon as the weather permits. If the season is early, we have our first chicks out early in March. If it remains cold, it is too risky to ship until a little later. book orders at any time for. future delivery. April, and June are the best months to ship chicks successfully. In some cases, chicks arrive same day of shipment. Do not allow chicks to lie in Postoffice twenty-four hours. This may cause many deaths. do not stand good for losses that occur in this way.

We

May

We

Chicks Arrive

Examine all chicks immediately and open your box in a (do not open In the cold) in the presence of your Postmaster or Mail Carrier. Count the number of live chicks you receive. We always add extra chicks to allow for

warm room,

small losses. Please remember that any claim for loss or shortage in your shipment must be certified by your Postmaster or Mail Carrier and mailed to us same day shipment is received.

Our Guarantee

Ship Via Parcel Post to Every Part of the Country

OUR TERMS It is

always best to send

must be made

j

i

;

:

I

j

full

amount with

payment

in full before chicks can

|

Personal checks. [

;

(

!

\

!

Our Paying

Varieties

a big difference in the worth of baby chicks. Those that come from heavy laying -strains that are bred for heavy egg production are worth more than average chicks. There is a big difference between May and January prices for eggs. Raise your layers and your stock this year from our chicks. Sell eggs next winter when prices are at the peak. is





180.00 180,00 160.00 160.00 189.00 130,00 130.00

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Canary Birds

—To

the persons seeking pin-money the

raising of canaries offers great possibilities. One can start in conservative with a small capital the venture requires little. estimate places the profit of one pair of breeding birds at $75.00 per year. There is always a good demand for American Raised

A

;

Canaries.

Birds with exceptionally good voices bring high

prices.

There are several different classes of canaries: The German Hartz Mountain, St. Andreasburg Roller and Seifert Roller are the most popular and best. All birds offered by us are in full plumage, from ten to eighteen months old and in full song. The Hartz Mountain is the most popular of all singers. Bach, $10.00, Their St. Andreasburg Roller: These are trained singers. tones are soft, musical and in variety; no harsh notes. Each, $ 12 . 00 .

order, as

be shipped. Pleasa do not ask us to ship C. O. D. If we cannot fill your order, we If it is not will return your money at once, with reasons. convenient to send full amount, we will book your order upon payment of 25%. The remainder must be paid 10 days before date of shipment. No orders booked without one-fourth payment. You may send Draft, Postoffice Order, Express Order or

There

95.00 95.00 85.00 85.00 95.00 70.00 70.09

Canary Birds (See Photo Page 153)

We guarantee that all of our chicks are from standard bred stock and true to name, and will deliver to the Postoffice chicks that are strong and healthy and able to travel to any State in the country. If you do not receive 97 per cent live delivery mail us your notification card signed by your Postmaster or Mail Carrier and we will replace all dead or short chicks over 3 per cent or refund your money. Our chicks are hatched right or we could not make this kind of a guarantee. No other claims or adjustments will be allowed on dead or short chicks.

We

20.00 20,00 18.00 18.00 20.00 15,00 15,00

25 50 100 500 1000 VARIETY Chicks Chicks Chicks Chicks Chicks Barred Plymouth Rock $4,50 $ 8.09 $15.00 $70.00 $135.00 White Plymouth Rock. 5.00 9.00 17,00 80,00 150.00 Buff Plymouth Rock .... 5.00 9.00 17.00 80.00 150.00 White Wyandotte 5.00 9.00 17.00 80.00 150.00 Silver Laced Wyandotte. 5.00 9.00 17.00 80.00 159.09 Golden Wyandotte 6.00 11.00 20.00 90.00 R. C. Rhode Island Red 5.00 9.50 18.00 85.00 160.00 8.00 15.00 70.00 135.00 S. .C. Rhode Island Red.. 4.50 Silver Spangled Hamburg 6.00 11.09 20.00 90.00 S. C. Buff Orpington .... 5.00 9,00 17.00 80.00 150.00 S. C. White Orpington. 6.00 11.00 29.00 90.00 Light Brahma 7.00 13.00 22.00 100.00 Black Langshan 5.00 9.00 17.00 80.00 150.00 Black Minorca 5.00 9.00 17.00 80.00 150.0® White Faced Bl. Spanish 7.00 13.00 22.00 100.00 S. C. Mottled Ancona 4.50 8.00 15.00 80.00 150.00 8.00 15.00 80.00 150.00 S. C. Buff Leghorn 4.50 S. C. White Leghorn .... 4.00 7.50 14.00 65.00 125.00 4.00 7.50 14.00 65.00 125.00 S. C. Brown Leghorn. 4,00 7.50 14.00 65.00 125.00 R. C. Brown Leghorn... .

When Your

11.00 11.00 9.50 9.50 11.00 8.00 g,0Q

Standard Quality Chicks—-Price List .

We

5.00 5,00 6,00 4.50 4,50



These birds are trained by experts Seifert Roller (males) and are known as Schoolmasters or trainers for the young Each, $14.00. These birds must be heard to be singers. appreciated.

Hartz Mountain (females) each, $2.25. Andreasburg (females) each, $3.00, We can ship them Birds must be shipped by express. safely to any part of the United States. We can ship birds in the coldest weather even more successfully than during the hotter months. In ordering let us know if the birds may be shipped any time or must we giye you several days’ notice. Birds will lay their first hatch in January or February; one female will raise several broods each St.

Order early. Bird Seed This seed contains only seeds that have been You will tried out and are used by bird raisers everywhere. be pleased with it. 1 lb,, 20c; 5 lbs., 60c; 10 lbs, or over, 10c per pound.

season.



1866

154

— HOUSE

OF GURNEY, YANKTON,

S.

D.— 1925

ONE OLD SOUTH DAKOTA HEN in 1S21

earned for

its

owner more NET income or profit than the entire corn acreage Pay more attention to the hen.

of the state.

BRINGS YOU A REGULAR $2.00 SACK Raise All Your Chicks

I

[

(

!

5

White Diarrhea, the national poultry plague, kills milThe poultry raiser’s loss lions of baby chicks every year. from this dreadful disease is tremendous. It’s a crime Stop against 'the poultry raiser’s efforts and his labors. losing from 30 to 55 per cent of your spring hatch. Prevent White Diarrhea by using Mayer’s Six Weeks Baby Chick

i

P

Developer.

Mayer’s Six Weeks is put up in sealed sacks only. One will last an ordinary flock of 140 chicks for six weeks. Don’t confuse these sacks with the ordinary four to sixounce package, because they are much larger and contain absolutely no filler. It is made up entirely of concentrated medicine and food. Is a Chick’s Life Worth One Cent? Think this over what are you doing for your chicks? Are you giving them a chance to earn a big profit for you? For less than one cent a chick you can make sure of raising 95 per cent of your hatch or your money back.

f i

sack

*

?!



li

'

*

*RKJES24H»

lii

ta

More Than a Preventive

for White Diarrhea Mayer’s Six Weeks Baby Chick Developer is guaranteed to prevent White Diarrhea and raise 95 per cent of all your chicks or your money back—but it does still more than this It it is a tonic, a food, a builder of tissue, blood and bone. is a scientifically prepared chick food that accomplishes the same wonderful results as the scientific foods that are used for babies the world over. Order today. Price, 89e; 6 packages. $4.20; 12 packages, $8.00.

it

Iri

tl

fc

lil

.1

K »

“MAKES THE LAZY HENS LAY” Every poultry

H-

some good,

practical way to increase the egg supply and make bigger poultry profits. The big trouble with the poultry business has been that the hens lay only when eggs are cheap, and quit laying when eggs are high priced. Since the discovery of Laymore, the world’s greatest laying tonic, thousands of poultry raisers are making bigger poultry profits than they ever thought possible. Their hens keep laying all winter long. You can get your hens to lay eggs at a cost of 12 cents a dozen. half cent’s worth of is sufficient for 12 hens. By taking advantage of my liberal offer here, every reader of this catalog can get enough Laymore to iast 100 hens for 6 weeks raiser in the world is looking for

A

ONE DOLLAR.

Sold Under an Absolute

LAYMORE

FOR ONLY

Money-Back Guarantee

The

experience of thousands of poultry raisers has been so remarkable and sucLaymore under the absolute guarantee that it will double your egg production or your money back. You have nothing to lose and everything to gain, so why not take advantage of my liberal offer of two dollar packages for only SI. 00 before it is withdrawn? This wonderful new discovery is a scientific preparation that makes your hens lay when eggs are high priced. It hurries your flock through the moult, starts them laying quickly. Price, $1.00 for two fuil sized packages. cessful that I sell

FERTILIZERS Odorless Lawn- Dressing

A lawn dressing that we can highly recommend. Good soil builder and plant food. For lawns use three pounds per 100 sq. ft., three times each year. 5 ibs., 49c; 10 lbs., 75c; 25 ibs,. $1,50; 50 ibs., $2.25; 100 ibs., $3.75.

Superphosphate This is used very extensively on heavy soils for all truck gardening, and should be used in conjunction with all animal manures. 5 ibs., 35c; 19 ibs., S5e; 25 lbs., $1.25; 50 Ibs., $2.00; 100 Ibs,, 53.25.

Ground Bone Meal an excellent fertilizer for all gardening purposes, particularly adapted for fruit trees, and all nursery stock. Should be forked in the soil in the fall if possible. 5 Ibs., 35c;

Is

roses

10

ibs., 60c; 25 Ibs., $1,25;

50

Ibs., $2=25;

100

Ibs., $4.00.

Groz-It Pulverized sheep and cow manure. No odor, dried, ready for use. Exceptionally if used in conjunction with superphosphate for lawns, golf greens, and gardens gen100 ibs., $3,25; 500 Ibs., $15.00; ton, $28.00.

good

%

erally.

Nitrate of Soda Should be used very carefully. One tablespoonful to gallon of water. Produces foliage abundantly. 1 3b., 20c; 2 ibs., 35c; 10 ibs., $1.59; 25 ibs., $2.55; 50 Ibs., $4.15; 100 ibs,, $6.95.



Peanuts These are Southern growm large peanuts, not suitable for seed purposes, but very desirable for roasting and eating. Can be roasted in any oven, and at the very low price should be kept in quantities for that purpose. 5 ibs., 93c; 10 Ibs., $1.75; 25 Ibs., $4.00; 50 ibs., $7.50; 100 Ibs., $14.00. Popcorn A very fancy popping brand, not graded for seed purposes, but will pop practically perfect. 5 Ibs., 60c; 19 Ibs., $1.19; 25 Ibs., $2.59; 59 Ibs., $4.50; 100 Ibs.,



S8.0C.

(

HI

SIEFERT ROLLER CANARY See Page 153

IK

PI]

flil

Ofi

1866

Is

what

— HOUSE

'‘Practical Potato Culture” its name implies, a treatise 'edited by a practical long experience,- E. A. Rogers, Maine, who is at the

grower of bead of Seed Improvement Department of that State which bolds the record of the largest yield per acre. It contains 128 pages with 26 half-tone illustrations, indexed mder 38 Chapter heads, giving information of General Faming,- Potato Soils, Humus, Deterioration of the Potato Seed Mid Cutting of Same, Saving Potato Boll Seed, Fertilizers, Cultivation, Insecticides,; Harvesting, Storehouses, Marketing, '

Home Gardens,

Melons; etc. The price of this valuable book is 50c, but for the present ve will mail copies free to our customers upon receipt of names md addresses plainly written and 6c postage stamps to pay postage.



OF GURNEY, YANKTON,

'

....

— 1925

155

Dry Lime Sulphur For

many

years growers have been using liquid lime sulphur solution; they are thoroughly familiar with its use and the results it will accomplish as a spraying material. A barrel of liquid lime sulphur weighs 600 pounds. Eighty pounds of dry lime sulphur will accomplish the same results. It is easily handled, can be carried over winter safely as it Will not leak out of container, and no danger of freezing. It is particularly effective in control of the following: San Jose Scale, oyster shell bark louse, scale insects fungus diseases, such as peach leaf curl and apple and pear canker, apple scab, ;

brown

on peach or plum, blistermite, etc. All orchards should have a dormant or winter spray of lime sulphur. For further information write for pamphlet. 1. Dormant Spray, for Scale when Blossoms Fall, 1 lb. to 3

Bug Death Aphis

D.

S.

rot

K gal. 2.

of water.

For

Worms and

Diseases,

1 lb.

Add

to 16 gal. water.

l /i lb. lead arsenate.

For speking

insects,: lice,; aphis,; flea,, beetles .and fungus, this ^reparatibn is offered; with full confidence. in its protective as There is no place where it can veil as destructive, power. vork injury, -its. sole mission being to' protect and to save.

For the Currant worn), the Flea beetle, the Rose or Tree rphis, as well as other forms, its destructive power is assured. d)r. Twitchell has for 16 years relied on Bug Death, which .

Bug Death Aphis, in all his field and garden work, with complete Success.. The housewife will here find the ideal agent to use for the ealth of all house plants/ and the greenhouse worker be assured security from all necessity for using any of the arsenical preparadons; the opchaTdist finds here the -ideal- dust ' for his trees ;arefully mixed, ready for use; the gardener be insured against ittacks from those pests and diseases which so often work serious injury, and all the while the health of the plant and That it is absolutely free ife of the soil wilL be enhanced. rom all forms of arsenic gives it a peculiar value with those vho would seek freedom from the dangers attending the use of hat indestructible mineral poison, whose only mission is to dll. We offer Bug Death Aphis, believing that it will meet i long felt want and prove of incalculable value to all growers. Constitutes the base of

-

.

Every ten days, repeat second spray. 1 pound packages $ 0.35 5 pound packages 1.25 10 pound packages 2.25 25 pound packages. 3.95 100 pound packages 14.80 Sulphur Powdered. For mildew. 1 lb., 15c; 5 lbs., 3.

.

.



60c; 10 lbs., $1.00; 100 lbs., $6.00. Bordeaux Mixture. Powder. Can be used dry or as a spray. When used as a spray, 6 lbs. to 50 gals, of water will make 3-3-50 mixture. 1 lb., 45c; 5 lbs., $1.70; 10 lbs., $3.25; 100 lbs., $21.00. Dry Lead Arsenate: A poison for chewing insects that does not burn the leaves and stays on longer than any other. Kills most insects rapidly and efficiently. Controls Codling 1 to Moth, Leaf-rollers, and all leaf chewing insects. lbs. to 50 gallons of water. Price, y% lb., 35c; 1 lb., 55c; 5 lbs., $2.38.

Saves

Money by Saving Crops

DIRECTIONS

estimated that rats and mice consume graineaehyearintheUnited States alone the value of more than of this waste can be saved if Rax is given It is

Apply, using Dickey Bug Death Duster, cheese cloth bag, or, for apple trees, power blower. First application should be when leaves are half-grown, and

dower gun,

second just as petals fall. With all house plants apply as soon as presence of aphis A generous application will at all times >r lice is suspected. mojnote health and prevent attacks. 12 oz. Sifter Top, each 25c, postpaid; 10 lbs.,' $1.40; (0-lb. Kegs, freight, $8.75.

[email protected] Plant Stimulant Tablet. An All-the-Year Fertilizer for Garden and House Plants Growers of fine flowers, shrubs and vegetables for the best narkets and for exhibition fertilize and stimulate them fremently, a little at a time. An excellent fertilizer for this purpose is Stim-U-planT, an odorless, highly concentrated plant-food,, in tablet form, with guaranteed chemical analysis )f The propor11 per cent nitrogen, 12 per cent potash. tions are accurate, there is no wasted filler. In this form you Stim-u-plant is Apply plant food just where you want it. Specially fine for roses, increases production, heightens color «nd improves quality at once. Amateur growers should F not ittempt to use other plant stimulant. This is prepared to| do lust what you desire use it out doors and in the potted plants n winter. It is fine for trees, gardens, flowers and potted Very easy to use. Full instructions with each packslants. Order “Stim-u-Plant” tablets with your seed and Ige. ree order. Trial size, 15c; medium size, 25c; 100 tablets, :5c; 1,000 tablets, $3.50. * ;

.

$10,000,000. a chance.

Most

Not a Poison.

While it is absolutely deadly to and mice, it is harmless to human beings, domestic animals, poultry and birds. It may be used anywhere

Rax

Is

rats

with complete safety.

Rats Leave Before They Die. Within a few days after eating bait prepared with Rax, rats and mice become feverish and seek the open air where they die outdoors. How to Use Rax. Add water to the bottle a.nd shake contents until water is cloudy. Then moisten bait (bread, crackers or cheese) with the mixture and place it near the Rax does not affect the taste of the bait. holes. Directions with each package. Bottle is enough for an ordinary house; allow one bottle to each 500 feet of floor space in Price, 75c per bottle, postpaid. large barns, mills, etc.



Pre ventol —The Spray Insecticide f

PREVENTOL cticide

Every single one of those in-

Jor home use

which now arid then discourage housekeepers, Pre-

sects

ventol

kills.

Do not drench things, spray lightly. Spray the general hiding places of all the following insects and they will be enAnts, Cockroaches, Moths, Bedbugs, tirely eradicated: Mosquitoes. Spray the bath tub and bowls. Wipe them with dry cloth and see them glisten. Use it on windows, mirrors and tue Flies,

floors.

'

,

,

Pre ventol is fatal to insect life, but is otherwise harmless. Price; Per combination package. Including sprayer and liquid, 80c; Extra quart bottles, liquid, $1.00.



Bug Death Gun This gun is the best and cheapest method Bug Death or other dust preventals. These can be packed up with your other orders, and you will find it a very satisfactory buy. Price, $1.00.

of distributing

Bug Death

A non-poisonous powder to be applied dry or mixed with water and sprayed on the plants. It. is death to the and cucumber bugs, currant and tomato worms. It is best applied dry with a duster or bellows Price, 1 lb. sifter at the rate of about 12 lbs. per acre. !bs„ $1,45; 100 tops, 25c; 3 lbs., 40c; 5 lbs., 65c; 12

potato, squash

%

lbs., $8,75,

Dickey Shaker, Shaker, 80c each.

for applying above,

50c each; B, D* Pat.

March

16 and

Nov.

9,

1897

1866— HOUSE OF

i5b

Premiums and We

GURNEY, YANKTON,

pay

in cash

Table Queen Squash, the highest yielding and best quality individual Squash. For the greatest number of Squash produced on one vine we pay $10.00 cash. Have reliable neighbors count with you the number produced on one vine, bothmf you sign the report and send it to us before December 15th. Gurney's Rainbow Flint Corn. For the longest ear of this remarkable Flint Corn we pay $10.00 in cash. The ear must be received by us on or before December 15th, 1925. Send it parcel post.

Gurney's Bugless Potatoes. The highest yielding and best quality and most immune from bugs of any potato. For the largest Potato grown from our seed, $10.00 in cash. The best potato must be received by us on or before December 15th, 1925. Send it parcel post.

With he painted his auto-

mobile with our special auto painting outfit, that it gives good wear, was easily

applied and it changed an old. car into a new one in one application.

We

are going to give one of these complete outfits just as long* as they last, and

we have put up many hundreds for this purpose, with each $40.00

order for any kind of goods selected from our catalog. This outfit consists

two high, quality two and three inch of

varnish bristle brush,

two packages

of steel

wool,

and

size

1

Mammoth Pumpkin.

With every order that goes from the garden and seed department, a paekage of this truly Mammoth Pumpkin seed will be included free of charge. These pumpkins weigh as high as 225 lbs. We pay for the largest Pumpkin reported $10.00 in cash. In order to enter this contest the pumpkin must be exhibited at a fair or displayed in the window of some store in your town, weighed and certified by yourself and a disinterested party. While on display it must bear a card “ Grown by from seed from Gurney Seed and Nursery Company, Yankton, ” South Dakota.

Gurney's Dakota Red Globe Onions. This is absolutely the best quality, the highest yielding, and the best money maker of all Onions. For the largest Onion received by us on or before December 15th, 1925, S10.00 cash.

Johnnie Grayson,

Maurice Wentworth in the traffic department says that his wife has had excellent results and saved an immense quantity of hard labor by using our outfit,

and he

people could only realize the convenience and labor saving qualities that they would if.

have one! These are worth $12.00 each, we are going to give- one with all

each $75.00 order, as long as the outfits last.

You

will certainly the canning

appreciate 4-

the Best Photograph _ owing every year from seed, trees or shrubbery, a beautiful vegetable or flower garden, nice landscaped home, a specimen flowering, or ornamental shrubbery, wonderful fruit trees with immense quantities of fruit, a fine field of corn, grain or forage, and we want from you a photograph of this, whatever it may be, and for the photograph vanning the cash prizes, we will pay $10.00 for the first selection, $5.00 for the second and the next four, $2.50 each. These will all be used in the 1926 catalog. Your father and mother, and in many cases, your grandfather and grandmother, planted Gurney’s Seeds and Trees. We want a photograph of the person or persons who planted them long ago. We would like the photograph taken with a grove, an evergreen, or any other tree or shrubbery that was furnished by Gurney and planted long ago. For this photograph we will pay $10.00 cash. All photographs must reach us before December 1st, 1925. ,

_

_

_

....

and

nice shrubs, trees

bulbs,

and that sometimes when people are ordering nursery stock, they, do not include all of the good things he thinks they should have, and this year he is going to include in each nursery order, articles from the nursery department that he thinks are fine, to the extent of at least 5% of the value of your order. I

know you

will

be mighty

pleased with the selections he will give you. Johnnie has been in the nursery department many years, growang, digging, planting, and packing, and he takes a lot of interest in the work.

Cossack Alfalfa

To The Farmer,

St.

Paul: After reading the experience

about Grimm would tell them- what three pounds of Cossack alfalfa will do up in this neck of the woods. In the spring of 1919 I sent to South Dakota for three pounds of. Cossack alfalfa seed which cost me $3. This I inoculated with some soil our county agent sent me, and sowed it broadcast on three-fourths of an acre the first week in June, on land that I thought was perfectly, free from weed seeds. But it was soon green with weeds and some scattered alfalfa. I mowed it once that summer, that is the weeds, and let them lie there and wished the alfalfa “good-bye.” But the surprise came the following spring. That alfalfa was three inches high before I could tell whether red clover w*as dead or alive. On the 15th of June it was lodged, so I cut it, although I didn’t think it fit .to' cut as no new shoots had appeared; and I got two fair-sized loads of clean alfalfa, not a weed in it. In a few days the patch was green again. The last of August I cut the second crop for seed. I got two more loads which threshed, out 132 pounds of seed, which I valued at that many dollars, although none of it was offered for sale. It was very tough when I threshed it, in fact it w*as sprinkling rain or I would have got more. of farmers

alfalfa, I

canning

in the

Nursery packing department me he has a lot of mighty

tells

2,

half gallon substitute for Turpentine, one qt. auto top dressing, one qt. auto enamel, your choice of colors, one pt. auto enamel, your choice of colors, one-half pt. engine and radiator black enamel. Colors Brewster Green, Mouse Gray, Black, Vermillion, Dark Wine, Auto Gray, Dark Blue. The value of this outfit is $4.92, we give it with a $40.00 order.

believes

Any Goods

a $40.00 Order for

Frank Seeley says

— 1912 5

Each Order

Gifts with

on the loth day of December, 1925, the following cash premiums for goods produced from our seed. will

D.

S.

My

from

different parts of the country

thought

I

neighbors told

me

I killed it

w*hen I cut

it

for seed,

was right there better than ever. I cut it the 20th of June and got two more loads. The second crop was left for seed, but it was so very dry I got only' 32

but

last spring it

.

pounds.

Now

have eight acres that I seeded last spring, the seed an acre which went into wdnter in fine shape, and 70 pounds to sow* this spring; and 1 sold three pounds for $3. It is the prettiest thing w hen in full bloom, all the colors you can think of. I

plot of three-fourths of

T

For Description and Price of the wonderful Cossack see page 65. Ask for booklet free, “Professor Hansen’s Search for Alfalfa in Siberia.”

1866— HOUSE OF GURNEY, YANKTON,

S.

D.— 1925

157

Radios on Time Payment Plan

THE CROSLEY,

The

known and most

best

satisfactory

instrument produced.

We

have selected from the thousands offered, the three Radio Sets on this page as being the best. We have selected the three below as the best general purpose sets that can be se-

cured. Understand

we can furnish larger sets if you require them

ALL RADIO SETS OFFERED BY US ARE ABSOLUTELY COMPLETE AND READY FOR OPERATION.

You do not have to buy extras to get best results when you purchase from us.

Price $37.50 The Crosley No. 51, is the biggest selling radio receiver in the world, having become such within 24 days after it was announced. Never before has a radio receiver received such and

tremendous

immediate

approval. Of the thousands already sold there has been no

complaint, and each are giving wonderful serviec. This is a two tube, long range regenerative set, it gives loud speaker volume at all times on nearby broadcasting stations,

and operates a loud speaker on far away stations under fair atmospheric conditions. It incorporates a tuning element made famous in the Crosley Type V, the $16.00 set used by Leonard Weeks, of Minot, North Dakota, in his consistent handling of traffic with the MacMillan Expedition at the

North Pole. The Model 51 is unusually selective. The various units are mounted on a beautifully engraved grained panel inside of a hardwood mahogany finished cabinet which completely encloses all parts and tubes. Price quoted includes tubes and necessary accessories. Cash with order, $37.50, our liberal time payment plan, $42.50.

Price $66.00 The Crosley No. 52, is a three-tube Armstrong regenerative radio receiver, consisting of detector and two stages of audio frequency amplification, phone-jack to plug in on two tubes and filament switch to turn off the “A” and “B” batteries when set is not in use. This receiver is unusually efficient, will provide loud-speaker volume on distant stations under practically all conditions and is in every way an ideal receiver for the home. The parts are mounted on a beautifully grained panel

of highest grade insulating material, and are in a hardwood finished cabinet. This receiving set will operate with either dry cell or storage battery tubes. It is equipped with the Crosley Multistat, designed to control properly the filaments of any type of tubes.

mahogany

The 52 is equipped with the Crosley Model “D” condenser, having molded plates. Price quoted includes tubes, batteries, loud speaker and complete aerial and other accessories. Cash with order, $66.00, our liberal time payment plan, $73.50.

Price $107.50 the receiver is installed in a larger cabinet in which there is room for dry cell “A” and “B” batteries, head phones and other accessories needed in its operation. The cabinet is of

mahogany, beautifully finished and artistically designed. As the lid is hinged, the tubes, etc., are easily accessible, and everything may be hidden from view by the lowering of this lid. All wires are hidden, except the aerial, ground and loud speaker leads, which may be silk covered. Thus the solid

still

Trirdyn 3R3 Special becomes a beautiful piece of furniture that corresponds very favorably with the finest article in the

most

The CrosleylTrirdyn

Special.

Home

furnishing experts

have declared that the Crosley Trirdyn 3R3 Special, illustrated the most beautiful radio receiving set ever manufactured, and radio experts have acclaimed it to be the most efficient. The set itself is the same as the Trirdyn 3R3, but above,

is

fastidious woman’s living room or parlor. Announcements of the Trirdyn Special met wide-spread approval and it has become tremendously popular. The Special Trirdyn and a loud speaker, placed on a library table, will be a welcome addition to the home from an artistic standpoint. Price quoted includes tubes, batteries, loud speaker and complete aerial Cash with order, $107.50 on our liberal time payment

plan, $117.50

Our Liberal Time Payment Plan We

furnish any of the above radios for 20% of the time payment price with the order, the balance divided into eight equal payments, thirty days apart. not avail yourself of this opportunity to have a strictly high class radio at once?

Why

Honey Bees South Dakota produces more honey per stand than any other state. A little money invested in Bees will give you more pleasure and profits than the same amount invested elsewhere. The Bees I am offering you are free from disease and are the very best Italian Bees obtainable. The writer of this article, P. S. Gurney, got two pounds of these bees with a selected queen the same as we are offering you and they made in a single season 192 pounds of surplus honey besides making about 60 pounds for their own use. What have you that will give you such sweet returns? Price 2 pounds Best Italian Bees and selected queen, $7.00 by express. (About 7,000 Bees per pound.)

Bee Supplies KD means Knocked Down, or in Flat; NP means Nailed and Painted. ONE-STORY STANDARD HIVE, WITH METAL COVER. The ten-frame hive is 1634x20 inches and 9% inches deep, The eight-frame size measures 13^x20 inches and 9% inches

outside measurements. deep.

Hives in the flat are furnished with nails, tin rabbets, reversible bottom-board, metal cover, with inner cover, Hoffman frames, and complete directions for nailing. If supers are desired they should be selected and ordered extra.

EIGHT-FRAME Weight

1

|

$ 4.80

26 34 128'

Price

1

3.65 16.25

|

I

TEN-FRAME

One-story Standard Hive as described above, with

Quantity 1 1

5

No No No

NP

KD KD

foundation foundation foundation

1

Price

Weight

Quantity

NP

29 37 145

KD 5 KD 1

$ 5.10 4.00

17.25

SHALLOW EXTRACTING FRAMES Shallow,

Per 19, 55c; per 50, $2.35; per 100, $4.50. Postage 10c. Each, 90c. Postage 5c. PRICE LIST OF SECTIONS. Favorite Price Ship. Wt.

x 114-in. top-bar, depth 5243)4 x 5 in. Each, $1.09. tulle throughout. 3 oz.

SMOKERS. VEIL.

Cotton

fouan.

4Mx4^xl%

f00

$1.50 7-00

4Mx4Mxl A 7

500

434x4)4x1

fcOO

lbs.

lbs.

4)4x4Mxl)4 4)4x4Mxl)4

4x5x1 4x5x1

% %

Price $1-35 6.25

lbs.

4)4x4Mxl%

lbs.

4)1x434x1

4x5x1% 4x5x1%

$1.20 5.50

Renown

434x4)4x1%

100

7

35

$1.35 6.25

%

7 35

PRICES OF SINGLE-PLY AIRCO

34

COMB FOUNDATION in

makes comb foundation very brittle and very liable to break in shipping, foundation in cold weather only at customer’s risk.

iweather

Dne Dne Dne

box box box Write for complete

suoer sizes 3

.

,79 ,77 list of

other bee supplies.

We

handle everything in bee

line.

Wt.

6 30

lbs. lbs.

6 lbs.

30

only.

Accordingly we shall ship Light Brood $ =82 lb.

1-lb. 2-lb. 5-lb.

%xl5 %

Ship.

lb.

lb.

lbs.

Cold

comb Thin

$ ,88 lb. ,85 lb. ,83 lb.

1866— HOUSE OF GURNEY, YANKTON,

158

A PORTION OF THE BUILDING

AND EMPLOYES OF THIS COMPANY

The above photograph shows a portion'of the main buildings, together with the employees working in these particular buildings, but does not include those working in the Nursery or in the Nursery Department.

We employ as high as 250 people, many of these employees have been with us for many years, many of them all of their This long service makes

lives.

it

you

service which your orders entitle

Remember

this

Company

possible to give'

D.— 1925

S.

you the

to.

has been in continuous operation

for fifty-nine years, always in the Northwest, Iowa, Nebraska! and South Dakota, that their goods are shipped all over it to, you and to hundreds of thousands of customers each year, that every year there has been an increase, in the mimber of customers over the previous year, which could only be accomplished by satisfying those who buy from us. -

I

II

The following are a list of the free Bulletins published. ,by us, and to which yop are welcome. This is* a part of the'Gurney Service.

?.

8s

&

Pumpkins and Squash. Root Crops.

Flowering Shrubs. Hardy. Perennials.

Fungus and Fungicides.

Rotation, Crops.

Hedge

Grasses, Pasture.

Rhubarb.

Marketing.

Beans.

Hot Beds, How Made.

Lawn Making. Melons, Musk and Water.

Small Grains. Sweet Peas. Tomatoes. Turnips and Rutabagas. Tree Seeds. Apples and Crabs. Bulbs and Tubers.

Peonies.

Celery.

Cane, Kaffir, Milo Forage Crops.

Asparagus. Alfalfa and Clovers. Prof. Hanson’s Search

for

Alfalfa.

Cabbage.

Crop Rotation.

Mushrooms.

Cauliflower.

Onions. Peanuts. Peas. Peppers. Potatoes.

Cucumber. Carrots, Stock and Table. Corn, Sweet, Pop and Field.

Hogging

Down

Corn.

Sudan.

Er

n I

Plants.

Er

Be

Plums.

Ca

Roses.

fa

Small Fruits. Spraying Insects -and Insec-

Co

Cri

Ee

ticides.

Strawberries.

fla

Shade and Forest Trees. Vines and Climbers.

Cuttings. Evergreens.

'

Hi

la-

Ur 11a

Distance Apart to Plant

Ilia

Me

The

distances

recommended here

Apples and Crabs Cherry and Plum

Hansen Plums Currants and Gooseberries Blackberries and Raspberries

Number 12x12 18x12 24x18 30x12

inches.

43,560

inches.

...... 19,360

inches.

15,520

inches.

17,424

In other localities it may be advisable to change them. Feet Apart No. Per Acre Feet Apart No. 20x24 90 Strawberries 182 12x24 Asparagus lx 4 12x16 228 Pie plant 4x 8 Trees or Evergreens for shelter belt 1,360 4x12 7'.” 3x 8 1,810 Grapes :r 6x s

are for this section only.

.

.

.

.

ffi

10,888

1

I!

10,888

Hal;

Orel

1,360

907 907

fe •

Pea-,

Pas

of Trees or Plants to the Acre at Given Distances 30x30 36x24 36x36 4x 4

inches

.

.

.

.

.

.

inches

.

.

.

feet

.

.

.

inches.

.

.

.

Instructions for Laying First secure check wire, heavy wire long enough. for the longest

.

Mi!

Per Acr<

garden

6,970 7,260 4,840 2,723

feet

2,178

feet

1.815

feet

680 435

feet

Out the Orchard

tape line or other way of the ground to be used, determine the distance apart you are going to plant, then fasten firmly to the line at the determined distance a marker of cloth or string. If a different distance one way than the other, then a different colored marker for the other distance. Then determine a corner tree or shrub, a place to start from, drive a stake at that point, place your first marker on your line at that point, fastening your line firmly not to that stake but to another in line with this first row far enough back to be out of the way, draw your line tight on the line wanted for first row and fasten firmly. Then place a stake (size half-inch by 12 inches is large 01100211 ) at each marker on outside of line. Then take far end of line and carry it quarter of a circle line,

5x 4 8x 3 8x 8 10x10

-

or Small Fruit

12x12 16x16 20x20 30x30

feet

30

feet

lTflBoi

feet

10

feet

4

.

Garden

which will make an exact right angle to first row, keep th first marker at first tree, stake at markers again on outside c line, then take up line and place first marker at last detei mined tree of last line, then pull line to parallel first line a near the width of the orchard as possible, then stake at marker again, then take line placing first marker at last tree in firs line and last marker at last tree in third line, moving th: stake in third row established in or out as your line will detei mine. Again stake at markers and then move both ends c line to next trees in both first and third lines established an so on until you reach the first tree in first and third line Tf directions are followed you will have perfec established. alignment in all directions.

,

f-.n

fjjj

ffirri

jWij ’etch

.

.

1866

— HOUSE

OF GURNEY, YANKTON,

Packages weighing up to and including seventy pounds will be accepted for shipment to any part of Zones one, two and three while the weight limit in Zones four, five,, six and seven is fifty pounds. The rates of postage vary in the different Zones and are: From Yankton, S. D. to Zones 1 and 2 5c for the first one pound and an additional cent for each pound added, if your shipment should weigh seventy pounds, the limit in 'these Zones the postage would be 74c.



Name

of

Seed

From Yankton,

15 8 12 10

60 36 5 30 30



Broom Corn

.

.

10

Buckwheat Cane Broadcast

— Cane— In

Drills

Corn [Crimson or Scarlet Clover

Emtncr Flax

Hungarian

Lawn Grass Lawn Grass Mammoth Clover

1



10 64 20 18

Orchard Grass Pasture Mixture Peas Canadian Field Broadcast Canadian Field with Oats. f’eas

— —

Dwarf Essex Led Clover Led Top Solid Seed Led Top Unhulled Led or Creeping Fescue Lutabaga Lye Lye For Nurse Crop Lye Grass Sheep’s Fescue Sorgum Broadcast Soy Beans Broadcast joy Beans In drills with corn

jLape

— —





— — Sudan Grass—Broadcast udan Grass— In

Speltz

drills

unflower weet Clover fall

Meadow Oat Grass Meadow Fescue

’imothy ’urnip 'etch

Gieat. 7hite Clover

.

.

25 96

60 8 40 40 25

...





90 75 3 10 10 20 2

42 20

14

lbs: lbs. lbs. lbs. lbs. lbs. lbs.

48 48 48 14 14 14 52 50 50 56

-

60 40 56 48

50 50 48

lbs. lbs. lbs. lbs. lbs. lbs. lbs. lbs. lbs. lbs. lbs. lbs. lbs.

30 ’

15 to 60 to 15 to 7 to 7 to 20 to 40 to

35

lbs.

75 85 20 80 20 10 10

25 50

lbs. lbs. lbs. lbs. lbs. lbs. lbs. lbs. lbs.

lbs.

10 to 25 2 to 3 40 to 50 120 to 150 S Ibs.

lbs. lbs. lbs. lbs.

Apr. 1st to Sept. 1st. Apr. 1st to Sept. 10th. Apr. 1st to Sept. 10th. March, April and May. April 10th to 25th.

May and June. Apr. -July and Sept. -Oct. Apr.-July and Sept.-Oct. and May. June 20th to July 10th. April

May May May

15th to 30th. 15th to 30th.

and June.

July to September. April.

May.

May

20th to July.

May

60

April 15th to

22 50

April to June. May 20th to July. May 20th to July. May 20th to July. May 20th to July. April 10th to 30th.

20th.

May.

lbs.

to 15 to 96 to 25 to 20 to 180 to 90 8 to to 15 to 15 to 25 35 lbs. 3 lbs. to 84 lbs.' to 70 lbs. to 25 lbs.

50 to 65 to

60 60

lbs.

15 lbs. 6 lbs.

40 to 40 to 40 to





S.

12 lbs. 15 lbs.

55

Millet— Common Millet— German or Golden Millet -Hungarian Japanese Millet

159

for each additional

50 lbs. 50 to 75 lbs. 12 to 15 lbs. 9 lbs. 14 to 20 lbs. 60 to 80 lbs. 28 lbs. 48 lbs. 70 to 95 lbs. lb. for 300 Sq. Ft.

Meadow Fescue

'all

20

to to to to to to to to to to

10 to 4 to

Mangle Wurtzel

— 19 25



Alsyke Clover Alsyke and Timothy Mixed Awnless Brome Grass Barley Barley For Nurse Crop

— —

D.

D. to Zone 4 7c for the first pound then pound up to 50 pounds. D. to Zone 5 8c for the first pound then S'. for each additional pound up to 50 pounds. From Yankton, S. D. to Zone 6 9c for the first pound then add 8c per pound for each additional pound up to 50 pounds. From Yankton, S. D. to Zone 7 11c for the first pound then add 10c per pound for each additional pound up to 50 pounds. Pounds to So w Pounds Per Bushel Per Acre Time to Plant

add 4c per pound From Yankton, add 6c per pound

Alfalfa

Blue Grasp Canadian. Blue Grass Kentucky Bromus Inermis

S.

50.: .

:

48 40 32 14

60 60 60 60 40 14 14

56 56 14 12 50 60 60 40 40 40 24 60 10 14

45 60 60 60

May. April and May. April 20th to 30th. April 10th to 30th. May 1st to Aug. 1st. April 15th to May 10th. May and June. May and June. May and June. June 15th to July 15th.

May and June. May and June. May 15th to 30th. May 10th to 30th. May 10th to 30th. April.

June and July. June and July. May and June. April and May. May and June. May and June. April and Sept. July 20th to Aug.

1st.

April 20th to 30th. April to August.

SL A.

I IN

160

FLOWER SEED Abutilon Achillea

Ageratum Alyssum Amaranthus

Anemone

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Antirrhinum

47 47 47 47 47 47 47 47 48

.

Aster

.

.

Balsam Balsam Apple

.

Sapanaria Scarlet

Beans, Castor

Bouncing Bet

.

.

.

.

.

.

Calliopsis

Cannas Canterbury Bell Cardinal Climber Carnation

Cockscomb ....

Centaurea Chinese Lantern

Chrysanthemums Cigar Plant Cineraria Clematis

Cobaea Scandens Coleus

Columbine Coreopsis

Cosmos Cowslip

Cucumber Cypress Vine Dahlias Daisy Delphinium Dianthus

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Zinnias

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Forget-Me-Not Foxglove Four O’Clock

.

.

.

.

.

.

55-60-61 59

,

62 62 59 63 62

.

.

GARDEN, FIELD, TREE SEED Almond

51 50 51 50 49 51 51 49 50 50 50 50 47 51 49 51 50

Asparagus Barley Beans

\

6-7-8-32 8-9-10

.

Beets Bee Supplies ..... Blue Grass Bird Seed Borecole

.

.

.

157 77 153 10 10

Broccoli

Bromus Broom Corn Brussels Sprouts

.

.

Buckwheat

Bug Death. ...... Bulletins Free ....

52

Cabbage Cane Canary Birds.

55

Carrots Cauliflower

.

.

.

.

......

Celery

11 12 11

Chard

9 152-153 Chickens Chicken Remedies. ..:... 154 11 Chicory. 15 Chinese Cabbage ...... 24 Citron .... 71-72 Clover 147 Corn Planters .... .73-76 Corn, Field ...... 86 Corn, Kaffir 18-77-154 Com, Pop 16-18-32 Corn, Sweet 11 Cress 15 Cucumber .

Gaillardia

.

.

Geranium. Godetia Gourds. Greenhouse Gypsophila Heliantheum. ......... .

.

.

.

.

'. .

.-.

Heliotrope Hibiscus

.

.

..

Hollyhock Hop Japs

.

.

Hunnemannia. Hyacinth Bean

.

Ice Plant Iris

Kochia

Kudzu

Vine. Larkspur...

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Linum

.

Lobelia

.

Lupinus Lychnis Marigold Mignonette Moon Flower

.

.

.

.

Mourning Bride Morning Glory

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

54 54 54 88 52 53 52 52 53 53 53 53 54 53 55 55 55 55 55 55

.

.

Dandelion Puller. Dandelion Seed. .

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Pyrethrum. ......... Queen Anne Lace

.

.

Flax

Garden Tools Garlic

Grafting Wax Grass Seed ....... Guarantee

56 55 55 56 56 56 54

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

57 60 58 58 57 55 56 55

151 86 154 79 146 18

Fertilizers

97 77 2 5 63 44 69 160

Gurneys Serbs Huckleberry Hull-lcss Oats .... Inde::

Inform a '.ion

.... 64-91

Insert, Color.

.

.

20

.

Feterita

.

.

18 18

.80

Endive „ Vanning Mills ....

.

Instructions Introductory.

.

Petunias ............. Phlox.... Platycodon Poppies Portulaca Primrose.

.ms .

Emmer

Nasturtiums Ornamental Grasses Pansy .57 Peony Seed ........... 58 55-60 Peas, Sweet .

.

Egg Plant .

Kale Kohl-Rabi Lawn Grass Leek Lettuce

Mangels -

Melon

.

.

33-67-93-127 2-89 1

.

10 18 .

.

.

.

.

.

78 29 .... 19-32 9-10 21-26

A

Last

have made this catalog. The thirty-four years previous to that the catalog was made by my father, Colonel C. W. Gurney. This is the fifty-ninth, and We are mailing I trust it will be of interest and value to you. to our friends and customers this year nine carloads of these catalogs. Besides this we print millions of free bulletins and write hundreds of thousands special letters on various horticultural and agricultural subjects. We are pleased to do this for you, knowing that it will increase the earning power of the agriculturist, and by spreading to him, or them, the knowledge which we have gained over a period of nearly sixty years, you may avoid the expensive mistakes others have made and thereby work profitably. For twenty-five successive years

I

Caladium Cannas Caragana

151 69-81-82 30 28-29 30 77

Catalpa Cherry Chestnut

Mushrooms Nitragin

Oats

•.

Okra Onions Onion Sets Orchard Grass. Order Blanks. Parcel Post Parsley Parsnips

.

.

.

.

.

.

Cinnamon

.

.

.

.

Pieplant. .

.

.

37 77 31-154 31-32-35 85

.

Potatoes Potato Planters. Potato Seed

83-84 150

Premiums

G-156

.

Rape Rat Destroyer. Red Top Rhubarb

.

.

.

.

.

Sorghum Soy Beans .....

.

Speltz. ....

Spinach Sprayers Sprav Material Sprinklers,

.

.

Lawn.

.

Sudan Grass .... Sunflower Sweet Potato

Grafting

.

.

.

Honeysuckle

Iris

Juneberry

Kudzu Lilac Lily of the Valley

Locust

Lyceum Maple Mountain Ash Mulberry

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

:

.

:

Ha

i

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

-

Rhubarb Root Grafts Roses

'

.

.

.113

.

Snow

.

:

.

100-119 112 Nut ...... ri5 Oak 116-119 Olive, Russian 124 Ornamental Shrubs Ornamental Trees. 113 Pea Tree 92-104 Peaches 92-100-101 Pears 32-136 Peonies 134 Perennials 134 Phlox 90 Pieplant 92-101 Plums 117 Poplar 119 Privet 101 Quince 32-90-108 Raspberry

87 146-147

124 133 -92-95-96-98 91 92-97 Apples, Crab Apricots 99 Ash 113 Asparagus 90 119-124 Barberry Basswood 113 Bedding Plants 88 Birch 113 Bittersweet 133 Blackberry 106 Box Elder 113 Buckthorn ..... 119 Buffalo Berry 135-144 Bulbs Butternut 112

.

Trees.

Weights

NURSERY STOCK

.

.

'

Lilies

f

Althea Ampelopsis Apples

.

Horseradish ......

44

Wheel Hoe

88 115 112 116-119 119-126 90 126 135 .100 .133 119-125 143 143 115 133 115

Hydrangea

.

Wheat

97

Hedge Plants

41-43 146-148-149 Tools 46 Tree Seeds 148 Trowels 45 Turnips 88 Vegetable Plants 85 Vetch 147 Weeders .

Wax

Grapes Greenhouse Hackberry Hazelnut

41 84 77

Timothy Tobacco Tomatoes

106-107

.

Gooseberry

40 85

Squash

.

.

Gladiolus

41 64 147 86 69-70 80 41 149 155 150

.

.

106 124 125 114 120-123 134 124 124 113 140 108-115

Elder

45 79 77

Rye Rye Grass

124r

Elm

2

.

Rutabaga

.

.

.

Evergreens Fern Flowering Currants Flowering Shrubs Forest Trees

37 38-40 157 80 155 77 37 40

Radish Radio

Seed Cleaning Seed Sowers.

.

.

Dogwood

.81

Proso

.

.

.

Dewberry

44

Pumpkins

Roselle Rules.

.

Currants Cuttings Dahlias Deutzia

85 38 ....... 37 37

Pepper Pomegranate.

.

143 143 .113-119 114 99-114 112 133 133 133 114 105 118 141

Cottonwood °-159

Pasture Grass Peanuts Peas

Vine.

Clematis Climbing Vine

.

Salsify

Celeriac

52 53 53 52 52

77 86 10 79 155 158 13-14-15 86 153

81 86 30

.

Milo Maize

Peas, Cow Peas, Field

65-70-156 ...... 6 ...... 6 .... 69-80

Alfalfa

51

...

57 ... 53-54

Wild Flowers

.52

Eschscholtzia Everlasting Flower.

.47-56

.

Violets

49 49 50

.

.

Candytuft

.

.

Sweet Peas Sweet William ... Tritoma Thunbergia Verbena

49-51

Calendula

Runner ....

Stocks Sunflower

47 47 58 58

.

59 58

Salpiglossis

47

Celosia

Millet

Salvia

Ball

Snowberry

.

Spirea

.

Strawberry Strawberry Boxes

.

.

Sumac Syringa

Thorn Apple Trees to Acre Tree Protectors

.

.

.

.

Trumpet Vine Tuberose. Tulips

Wahoo Walnut Weeping Trees. Weigela

Willow Wistaria

.

.

.

.

90 104 130 125 .130 .119-129 110 110 130 129 117 158 97-150 133 143 144 130 112 117-118 130 117 133

*

Word Agriculture, of which we are a part, has staged a wonderful come-back in 1924, with every prospect that in 1925, with the increased confidence and earning power, will be still better. I am writing this just before the holidays of 1924, and I want to express to you and yours my appreciation of the very large! increase in business which you gave us in 1924 over any previous and, by the way, they year, and to all of the new customers were greater in number than for any other year in the past fifty-nine— our whole organization sends to you our best wishes for a prosperous 1925.



Yours

truly,

D. D.

GURNEY, President.

PEONY THE MOST POPULAR ,

AND HARDY FLOWER

Reine Victoria

THE FOUR BEST SPECIAL PRICE

ONE EACH $1.90

Couronne D’Ot

Marechal Vallient

ONE EACH 0F^| THESE FINEST PEONIES Francois Ortegct

yCARRIE GOOSEBERRY

100

50

10

tach 25c

$2.15

1 Mrk Henry Wirth 1 each five “ " 2 Maiy Garden'-. ^3

3

StiYdella

'%

I

varieties

$1.10



S3 00

all varieties

-

each $ .20

$9.00 $17.00

f

PERFECTION CURR/i 5G 10 25 c. $1-90 $9.00 $l\

f Each '

^jgPFHA'NSE

^WTA

RASP BE;

i 50 20 20c. £1.30 $3.00 $i

EacA

GLADiOLUS^M King ^

1 Mrs. F. .3

Panama

3 2 each “ *' <

-

"

Var.

“ "

SU B LATA PHL The great border plant.

2 Schwaben $ .40

£

.75

£ 1.40

li