ERIC ED131323: Vocational Education Program Evaluation Project. Final Report

DOCUMENT RESUME ED 131 323 AUTHOR TITLE INSTITUTION SPONS AGENCY REPORT NO PUB DATE NOTE EDRS PRICE DESCRIPTORS IDENTIFIERS 08 CE 009 010 Elson,...

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DOCUMENT RESUME

ED 131 323 AUTHOR TITLE INSTITUTION SPONS AGENCY REPORT NO PUB DATE NOTE

EDRS PRICE DESCRIPTORS

IDENTIFIERS

08

CE 009 010

Elson, Donald E. Vocational Education Program Evaluation Project. Final Report. Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg. Div. of Vocational-Technical Education. Office of Education (DHEW) , Washington, P.C. Vt-103-342 jun 76 73p.

MF-$0.83 HC-$3.50 Plus Postage. *Evaluation Methods; literature Reviews; *Program Evaluation; Question Answer Interviews; Questionnaires; *School Visitation; State of the Art Reviews; *Vocational Education Virginia

ABSTRACT

Procedures and guidelines for use by visitation teams were developed and field tested to determine appropriate activities for such teams in the evaluation of vocational education programs in Virginia, and to expand and improve the annual local evaluation as a self-evaluation procedure. A review of the literature was conducted to determine the state-of-the-art from which preliminary guides were developed for conducting onsite evaluations. The annual local evaluation guidelines were revised and distributed to all school divisions. The major portion of the report consists of appendixes which contain the project-developed literature review for onsite evaluation, the general outline of activities for visitation team evaluation, the visitation team interview guide, and the annual local evaluation procedures, forms, and guidelines. (NJ)

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FINAL REPORT

Vocational Education Program Evaluation Project

Research Project in Vocational Education Conducted Under Part C of Public Law 90-576

The project reported herein was performed pursuant to a grant from the Office of Education, U. S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare. Contractors undertaking such projects under Government sponsorship are encouraged to express freely their professional judgment in the conduct of the project. Points of view or opinions stated do not, therefore, necessarily represent official Office of Education position or policy

Donald E. Elson Division of Vocational and Technical Education College of Education Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University Blacksburg, Virginia 24061

U S DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH.

June 1976

EDUCATION WELFARE NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF EDUCATION

THIS DOCUMENT HAS BEEN REPRO. DUCED EXACTLY AS RECEIVED FROM

VT

103

342.

THE PERSON OR ORGANIZATION ORIGINATING IT POINTS OF VIEW OR OPINIONS STATED DO NOT NECESSARILY REPRESENT OFFICIAL NATIONAt INSTITUTE OF EDUCATION POSITION OP POLICY

Vocational Education Program Evaluation Project

Summary

The Division of Vocational Education, State Department of Education (DVE/SDE) funded the project, based in the Division of Vocational and

Technical Education, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University for the period July 1, 1975 to June 30, 1976.

Objectives

The objectives of this project were (1) determine through a state-of-theart study the current approaches to the use of visitation teams; (2) to develop and field test the procedures and guidelines for use of visitation teams in Virginia; and (3) to continue to expand and improve the Annual Local Evaluation as a self-evaluation procedure.

Procedures

A state-of-the-art study was conducted through a review of the literature to determine the current approaChes to the use of visitation teams.

From the

study, preliminary sets of procedures and interview guides were developed.

No field test was conducted as a part of this project since DVE/SDE made available funds beginning with FY77 to support projects within school divisions

which would, in.effect, field test the materials developed by this project. The procedural booklet and guidelines for the Annual Local Evluation were

revised, printed, and distributed in sufficient quantities to all school divisions.

Project Staff The project director was the only professional staff member.

A half-time

clerk-typist was hired at the beginning in May to complete the project.

3

Results and Accomplishments A review of the literature was conducted in orrio.r to determine the state-of-the-art from which preliminary guides Were developed for conducting an on-site evaluation.

The Annual Loce:, Evalation guideline.; were revised

to more closely conform to the major goals of voca±:ional education as set forth by tne D'VENDE.

Evaluation

No third party evaluation was required.

The staff of the Divisions of

Vocational Education and Educational Research and Statistics, State Department of Education, provided continuous evaluation.

Conclusions and Recommendations 1,

The Annual Local Evaluation is providing a workable procedure for local school divisions to conduct an annual sclf-evalua...ion of the vocational eduction programs. This system should be continually evaluated in order to improve its effectiveness.

2.

Only meager to conduct an a change from self-study to

beginning was made to delop the procedures necessary on-site evaluation by use of A visitatioa team'clue.to the use of the Annual Local Evaluatien as the basic procedures used by the Southern Association. Considerable work is yet required tolfully operationalize these procedures. .-.

4

.

THE PROBLEM

School divisions of the Commonwealth of Virginia are required to revise Lnei update annually the five-year school improvement plan.

Systematic program

evaluation in the foundation upon which program planning is built.

Local

self-evaluation and use of a visitation team are the major components of a sysi:ematic program evaluation.

The basic procedures for conducting a systematic

local self-evaluation have been developed.

This research project was concerned

with determining the appropriate activities of a visitation team and developing related guidelines.

BACEGROUND INFORMATION

Initial work on developing a systematic local eValuation procedure began in January 1973.

A self-evaluation procedure was developed and field tested

in four school divisions in the spring of 1973.

Revisions were made based on

the field test and recommendations of such groups as the DVEISDE staff and local directors of vocational education.

Statewide implementation of the revised

procedure - Annual Local Evaluation - took place in April 1974 on an optional basis.

Sixty-eight school divisions evaluated their vocational education

programs or a portion thereof, during the spring of 1974 using the Annual Local Evaluation procedures.

The results and experiences from these school

divisions served as the basis for another revision and some expansion of the evaluation procedure.

All school divisions in Virginia have been requested

to incorporate the Annual Local Evaluation procedure into their evaluation of the vocational education programs in the' spring of 1975. Self-evaluation as outlined in the Annual Local Evaluation provides for teachers and supervisors to have direct input into the evaluation process. Students, former students, employees, and other lay persons of the community

5

/

participate actively by serving as members of advisory committees. -Selfevaluation provides through self-study an inward look at the vocational programs.

The information and recommendations resulting from the self-evaluation

should be reviewed by persons not directly involved with the vocational education program.

This review by a visitation team will verify the self-

evaluation and provide additional data and recommendations

to the school

division for use in planning the vocational education program.

OBJECTIVES

The objectives of this research were: 1.

to determine through a state-of-the-art study the current approaches to the use of visitation teams.

2.

to develop and field test the procedures and guidelines for use of visitation teams in Virginia.

3.

to continue to,expand and improve the Annual Local Evaluation as a self-evaluation procedure.

PROCEDURES

A state-of-the-art study was made to determine current approaches to the use of visite

on teams.

Information gained from thjs study provided the

basis for the development of a preliminary set of procedures and guidelines for Virginia.

The Annual Local Evaluation guidelines were revised based on feedback from the DVE/SDE.

After revision the booklet was printed and distributed

in sufficient quantities to all school divisions.

PROJECT STAFF

Dr. Donald E. Elson, project director, was the only professional staff member.

A clerk-typist (1/2 time) was hired at the beginning of May to

provide necessary secretarial assistance.

qualifications of Proiect Director Education: Ph.D.

- Michigan State University, 1972. (Major: Vocational Education; Minor: Administration and Higher Education; Cognate: Research and Evaluation)

M.S.

- Kansas State University, 1968.

(gajor:

Agricultural Education)

B.S.

- Kansas State University, 1958.

(Major:

Agricultural Education)

Experience:

Currently Assistant Professor Coordinator of curriculum and program evaluation in the Division of Vocational Education, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. Principal developer of the Annual Local Evaluation procedure.

RESULTS AND ACCOMPLISHMENTS

A review of the literature was conducted in order to determine the state-of-the-art.

Research reports and evaluation documents from states were

reviewed.. A copy of the report is included as Appendix A of this report. After completing the state-of-the-art study, a set of preliminary procedures and guidelines were developed.

The basis of these procedures was

the use of the Annual Local Evaluation as the self-study.

DVE/SDE personnel,

after study of these procedures decided that the visitation approach should

be more in line with the approach used by the Southern Association for accreditation purposes.

As a reFult, considerable work is yet to be done to develop

an on-site evaluation procedure for vocational education which will conform to these procedures used hy the Southern Association.

No field test was conducted.

The DVE/SDE has made money available through exemplary funds to assist school

divisions in conducting an on-site evaluation for the fall of 1976. provide a field test of the work of this project.

7

This will

EVALUATION

No third party evaluation was required.

The staff of the Divisions of

Vocational Education and Educatipnal Research and Statistical, State Department of Education, provided continuous evaluation.

CONCLUSIONS AND RECONNENDATIONS

1.

The Annual Local Evaluation is providing a workable procedure for local school divisions to conduct an annual self-evaluation of the vocational education programc. This system should be continually evaluated in order to improve its effectiveness:

2.

Only a meager to conduct an a thange from self-study.to

beginning was made to develop the procedures necessary on-site evaluation by use of a visitation team due to the use of the Annual Local Evaluation as the basic procedures used by the Southern Association.

Appendix A Procedures for On-Site Evaluation State-of-the-Art

9

Procedures for On-Site Evaluation

A State-of-the-Art Study

by

Donald E. Elson,, Ph.D.

Division of Vocational and Technical Education Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University Blacksburg, Virginia 24061

Procedures for On-Site Evaluation A State-of-the-Art Study

Rationale for On-site Visitation The question can be asked, who should evaluate?

The answer to this

question has implications for visitation teams.- Proponents of visitation teams claim that someone outside the organization can see problems in a new light and may be able to suggest solutions not seen by those working day-today with the problems.

Opponents suggest that outsiders may not have

sufficient insight into the reality of the problems and, therefore, could antagonize school personnel (Byrnside, 1969).

Verification of information provided by the self-evaluation report and presentation of additional information seem to be two major reasons for the use of visitation teams.

Ash (1971:20) adds to Chis rationale by

stating that the purpose of a visitation team is ".

.

.

to evaluate the

institution's systems for conducting valid self-evaluation, to verify the extent to which outcomes correspond with need and with stated objectives, and to supplement the Self-evaluation Report with additional data and documentation where needed."

The Illinois Office of Education (1975b:e)

indicates that the purpose of the visitation team is ".

.

district with.a profile of its total occupational program .

to provide a local .

.".

Visitation teams for on-site evaluation of vocational education programs have been used in Tennessee since 1971.

These procedures have,

.

.

.

proven

to be time-consuming and financially burdensome." (Wallace, 1975:iii) An indepth study was initiated to evaluate the procedures and make recommendations for future evaluation of vocational programs.

Wallace (1975) presented the

following conclusions as a result of the study in Tennessee: 1.

.

Information obtained from currently used instruments for,on-site evaluations by visiting teams was not adequate to be able to determine relative quality of vocational-technical programs.

11

. 2.

Currently used state evaluation instruments were not definitive or specific enough to identify the same quality aspects of vocationaltechnical prograzz as did the Ray Self-Checklist evaluation instrument.

3,

Professthnal vocatioaalytechnical educators could not.. analyze team visit reports and adequately determine the quality of'selected vocational-technical programs. State evaluation procedures need to include checklists where more observations could be made.

4.

Guidance counselors were less able to identify elements of quality vocational-technical programs than were teachers or principals.

5.

Some of the elements on the Ray Self-Checklist overlapped in their interpretation.

6.

A panel of experts, unfamiliar with each individual situation and trying to glean information from an on-site team report, was not able to identify outstanding elements of:quality vocational programs as easily as the professionals who were closest to the situation.

The major recommendation made by the Wallace study was that instruments

should include more quality indicators and should be objective in nature. (1975:12)

Selection of Team Members The selection of the team leader is of critic:al importance.

The individual

selected as team leader should have experience in vocational education and be familiar with the total vocational program, understand the needs of various size schools, and be a competent leader.

(Illinois, 1975a)

The team Members should represent each vocational area for which prepare-tion is offered, plus, students, administrators, guidance, and other specialized areas related to the vocational program'(Ash; Illinois; National Study). number of individuals on the team varies with ".

.

The

the size of the school,

the number of days that will be available for the visit, the amount of

experience of visitors, the interest in using the visit as a phase of in-service education, and the willingness of the visitors to work long hours."

(iNational

Study) Jhe selection of the team members should be a joint effort between the school and the evaluating agency.

12

.11,2111 I

The Visic The most important

concept to be kept in mind by the visiting team and

all individuals in the school is the': the team is not at the school to find fault, but to verify and supplement facts. Each set of procedures reviewed relied upon a set of guidelines t direct the activities of the visitation team. 1975 a and b; National Study; Tennessee)

(Ash; West Virginia; Illinois

While these guidelines varied in

complexity, all attempted to elicit data and information for making well

inforwd decisions and recommendations.

Summary Conference

The "summary conference" between the team and school personnel was deeped important especially by the IllinoislOffice of Education.

The purpose

of this conference is to communicate the team's findings to the school personnel,

This meeting also provides an opportunity for the administrators

of the school to make known any limitations they may see which would hinder the implementation 0Z ehe recommendations made by the visitation team.

13

\

References j\IV\A

e J

Instruments and Procedures for the Evaluation of ocat4gAiiiiiii6 .al4ducatiou. Washington, D.C.: National Study for gib ) al/Technical Education, American Vocational Ass c.h ,

"Principles for Evaluation of Business and tor Ev;ituacialOusiness Off _ 7ancation.

,I.

1

on, D.C.:

National Bus,,

.,_ou Asso

ui ice of Edutation. Team Leadel u ibook for Conducting OnSite Evaluations. Springfield: Illinois Office of Education. (no date)

Illinois Office of Education.

Three Phase S stem for Statewide Evaluation of Springfield: Illinois Office of

accuzationalEdonProrams. Education.

1975.

National Study of Secondary School Evaluation. Evaluative Criteria. 4th edition. 'Washington, D.C.: National Study of Secondary School Evaluation. 1969.

Wallace, Juanita D. "A Comparison of Procedures for Evaluation of Vocational Education Programs". Research Series No. 45. Knoxville: Tennessee Research Coordinating Unit, University of Tennessee. February 1975.

West Virginia Department of Education. "West Virginia Vocational Education Evaluation System". Charleston: West Virginia Department of Education. (no date)

14

Appendix B General Outlide of Activities for Visitation Team Evaluation

15

/,

General Outline of Activities for Visitation Team Evaluation 1.

September 15, 1976. All school personnel involved with vocational education will review the 1976 Annual Local Evaluation Report as submitted to the Division of Vocatiohl Educagion.

Mutual agreement will be reached between the project director and the Division of Vocational Education as to the persons to be named as members of the visitation team. 2.

September 15

t,

will

1,er 15, 1976.

Three-1

! personnel from VPI &

wt)rkshop for the team members and/or the Livision of Vocational

Educ.

Project director will complete or have completed the following: a.

b. c. 3.

Division Itformation form - project director Instructor Information form - all personnel involve6 with vocational education Student Information form - all students enrolled in a vocational course.

October 15, 1976. _Project director will provide members of the visitation team with copies of the 1976, Annual Local Evaluation Report, the current Annual and Five-Year Plan for Vocational Educaron, summaries of L,le three forms listed above, and other data and informn which will assist the team.

4.

Octobc

L5 to Novembr Li. 1976.

visits__ di. .

5.

.

Report

Conduct thr

be prepared and revit-

lasternoon of visit. Decedr-T 15, 1976. Final copy of visitation rt direct and Submitted to team leader for his to thc Division of Vocational Education.

ay on-site evaluation by with school personnel duzin:_;

LA. prepared by project proval. Six copies sent

Visitation Team Interview Guide will be used by team members to study vocational educatioa in division and as a guide as they interview Individuals during the visit to the school. Reference data are obeained from the Annual Local Evaluation 1976 Repor, the Division Information form (D), the Instructor Information form (I), and the Student Information form (S).

16

VISITATION TEAM

INTERVIEW GUIDE

Major Goal Youths and adults will acquire the skills and knowledge needed for initial and continuing employment or self-remployment in occupations of their choice

and for which there are employment opportunities and they will also acquire the competencies needed as consuemrs of goods and services, for home and family living, and for personal use.

Objectives of Interview: 1.

Determine how many of the five cecupatonal areas are available .to students and-determine the effectiveness of each area.

2.

Determine whether the occupational courses are sequentially structured into occupational programs.

3.

Determine if measurable objectives exist for (a) total program, (b) individual programs, and (c) specific courses.

4.

Determine the criteria used to identify disadvantaged and handicapped students.

5.

T").termine what additional services are'being proNiided for the disadvantaed

and handicapped students. 6.

.

Determine what provisions are mader-to insure that students are employable

by the time they terminate their formal education either by graduating or dropping out.. 7.

Determine how knowledgeable students are about the purposes, objectives 4nd activities associated with the occupational program in which they are enrolled.

&.

Determine whether the occupational programs offered students adequately prepare them for employMent.

9.

Determine if the training needs of adults in the community are being met.

Reference Data: 1.

Guidelines for Annual Local Evaluation, Part B, Sections 1 and 2, 1976 report.

2.

(1-11)

Are the occupational purses sequentially structured into a program?

Yes

No

(1-12)

3.

a.

Are there stated and measurable objectives for:

the division's total occupational program Yes

b.

No

the program(s) in which you teach, administer, or provide guidance Yes

No

the course(s) wnich you teach, administer, or provide guidance

c.

Yes (1-13)

4.

Not sure

No

Some

Are you familiar with your institution's plan for identifying

disadvantaged and handicapped students? Yes 5.

No

(1-14)

Are additiona_ services provided for disadvantaged and handicapped

students?

Yes 6.

(other than special education) No

(5-10)

Not sure

Do you feel youroinstructor(s) have clearly explained the objective

and goals of your occupational course(s)? Yes 7.

No

(S-12)

Rate.your program in terms of preparation for an occupation.

Average

.

Low

You ld .you...recommend...the -occupational -..pr ogi.,am -whichyou- ar e- in --tcr--.

a

Yes

7.- end?

No

19

9.

(S-14)

Do you expect to:

get a job doing what you are learning? get a job similar to the one you are learning?

continue studying about the same job at another school after grluar make little use of what you are 7 oul_ci you like to change to another occupational program?

No 11.

(S-:3)

Is your preferred .1rogram available?

Yes 12.

(S-17)

No

Is it possible to -Jlange programs if you want to?

Yes 13.

(D-6)

No

What percentage of -fur student population is enrolled in occupational

education? 14.

(D-7)

Refer to enrollment t.-Dle (item 7) on Division Information form.

20

3.

Major Goal II

Youth and adults will become aware of employment or portunities and requirements

:alkin

_-employr

op-

career choiL:e and in cii.amining

their education programs.

Objectives of Interview: 1.

Determine the availability ar, qt Ility of t

K-8 occupational information

program. 2.

Determine whether the content of occupational orientation courses (9th and 10th grades) is appropriate for that level.

3.

Determine if program and course objectives are communicated to students.

4..

Determine who is inValved in providing occupational guidance services to students (instructional staff, guidance personnel, etc.).

5.

Determine the extent of the following services provided to students: a.

Availability of current career information materials (guidance office, library, ecc.),

b.

Formal rlacement service (full time or part time employment and advanced training).

21

Reference Data 1.

Guidelines for Annual Local Evaluation, Part B, Sections 1 and 2, 1976 report.

2.

(8-11)

1

Do your current occupgtional courses relate to your chosen career

goals?

Yes 3.

No

(5-9 )

Are you aware of occupational program and course objectives?

Yes 4.

Somewhat

No

(S-4)

Last year I met with a counselor: more than 5 times

once

4-5 times

never

2-3 times (5-5 )

.(S-6)

.I would r.-ate my counselor's knowledge of the wotld .of work as:

High

Below average

Average

I don't know

I would rate the iuformation. I have received from counselors with

regard to my future occupation High 7.

(S-7)

Some

:

None

Outside of your own personal interest, who encouraged you'the most

to enrollin the occupational program you are now taking? Instructor or admi:-..i,:rator

1-arent

Guidante co'unselor

None of these

Friend 8.

(0-10)

WiLh Lhe exception oF cooperative e6ucatien students. doeu

division provide placement services for: a.

Enrolled students

Yes

No

b.

Dropouts

Yes

No

c.

Graduates

Yes

No

22

'Major Goal III

Youths and adults will exhibit pride in work well done; confidence in ability to Terform in the world of work; and develop leadership abilities, responsible cit-zenship, and a realistic self-image in relation to work in their chosen vocation.

Obj_c.tives of Interview: 1.

Detnrmine the scope, availability and effectiveness of youth organizations in serving students' needs and interesr.s.

23

Reference Data 1.

Guidelines for Annual Local Evaluation, Part B, Section 1 and 2, 1976 report.

'.

(S-3)

I am a member of a vocational student organization? No

Yes, meets more than once a month Yes, meets once a month Yes, meets 2 or 3 times a semester Yes, meets 2 or 3 times a year Yes, meets less than 3 times a year 3.

D-3)

Membership in student organizations. FFA FHA

FBLA

DECA VICA HERO Other

24

Major. Goal IV

Youth and adults will benefit from programs improved and expanded through ancillary activities, including teacher educatio, research, guidance, super* vision, planning and evaluation.

Ob'ectives of Interviod: A.

Research 1.

Determine procedures for assessing student needs, oocupational interests and abilities and utilizing this tnformation.

t.

25

Reference Data 1.

GUidelines for Annual Local Evaluation, Part B, Sectkon 1 and 2, 1976 report.

2.

(1-17)

Do guidance personnel,and instructors work together in identifying

students' ileeds and interests.

Extensi7ely

Little

Moderately

None

3.

(D-4)

What is the current unemployment rate for your area?

4.

(D-5)

What is the current youth unemployment rate for your area?

5.

(D-8)

What was last school year's dropout rate for all high school

students? 6.

(D-9)

What is the administrator's estimate, by percentage, of graduatea

what enter: four year colleges

two year post-secondary

one year post-secondary certificate program private career school immediate job placement (exclusive of Armed Forces)

26

Objectives of Interview: B.

Guidance 1.

Determine the involvementlof guidance personnel in the fullowing: a.

Occupational advisory,committees

b.

Identification of disadvantaged and handicapped students

c.

Participate in the conduct of formalized follow-up studies

d.

Evaluation of guidance services

e.

Development and operation of the K-3 occupational information program.

f.

Conducting inservice programs to acquaint instructional staff

with the guidance services available to students.

27

1

A .Reference Data Guidelines for Annual Local Evaluation, Part B, Sections 1 and 2, 3976 report.

r.

/

28

1

Objectives of Interview: C.

Planning 1.

Determine who was inVolve4 in establishing the total Occupational program objectives as stated in the Plan for Vocational Education.

2.

De,.armine what relationship exists between (a) total program, (b) indi-

vidual program, and ;c) specific course objectives. 3.

Determine how often the (a) total programo(b) individual program, and (c) course objectives are reviewtd for possible revisiOn.

4.

Determine if board, administration, advisory committees, students and staff members are knowledgeable about total program objectives.

5.

Determine the need for addition, expansion or deletion of occupational programs.

6.

Determine the extent,of articulation of occupational programs at all levels of education (elementary, secondary, post-secondary and adult).

7.

Determine the extent of the coordination of occupational programs, both within and between departments or divisions.

8.

Determine the working relationship among all department in conducting a total occupational program.

9.

Determine how effectively the'lollowing internal resources are utilized in planning, conducting and/or evaluating occupational programs: ,a.

Staff

b.

Students

c.

Financial resources

29

Objectives 1

C.

interview:

conti-lued)

Planni7; 10,

how effc

e fon- wing ex:

in planning, cy

:-esour

:ing ad evaluag

are

occupat:xmal programs:

_sory.committees

munity business and industrial perso: -imunity business and industrial fcciLci a.

vernmental and ci

agencies (i.e.,

7

Alo:Ls State Employmenr

rvice, Chamber of :ommerce, etc.). e.

.;c,int agreements and contracts with other public and proprietary

institutions.

1:

30

Referenc._ Dat: 1.

GuilineE

2.

(I-1L)

At,

3.

(I-16)

Were

.Dcal Evaluatm, Part 1 31:z:

Division one 747

action 1 and 2, 19-6 report,

,:i and mpasurable objecti- 3?

-ad in planning and/or mallang changes in f

17,7.

local

ar plaz fc-17 vocational ecucation?

Extenz_.

Moder 4.

,(D-2)

None

Do cit

your community serve on occupational educati.on

advisory comm. Yes

Nc

If yes, is the one a separa:

committee for all occupational areas? for each area?

both.

0:

31

Objectives .1-17 Interview: D.

Evaluation 1.

Detarmine how programs and courses are measured

st the

.

objectives

by whom, how frequently, etc.).

Determine what activities are included in the eva.iu__-:-Lon syE:tem being conducted by the division (i.e., student follow-am.

-7_aff evaluation,

cost analysis, employer survey, facility assessmc 3.

Determine who is involved in conducting the evalur_ Lo:11 system (i.e.,

teachers, administrators, students, advisory commiza-,e members, etc.). 4.

Determine how evaluation results are used (i.e., course revision, program revision, modification of instruction, deletion or addition of prgrams, etc.).

f;

32

Data

.\ 1.

:uilines for Annual Local _-aluat_

2.

:1-

V:. __oh term .L.F_IsL-.ribe_

'our

;'art B,'Sections :t_on system fc-7

2. 1976 repot:. :ional

eduL_Llor.

Fc7mal 3.

(D-11,

Informal

ne

IDes your school ha-,:e a formal follow-up program tha

f 7our entire stude:: Yes

body-:

No

Only occupational students: 4.

(D-12)

:;ives a

Yea

No

Do students have an opportunity to formally evalua

2ir oc-

cupaional courses and programs? Yes 5.

(D-1_.)

No

Who 1-eceives a copy of the Annual Local Evaluation Tanort con-

ducted each spring?

t,

33

'ectiv

-e Organization

wind.

the support : '7 1:17:,-

-,,

zupatio:,_: programs by administrators and

7bers.

if the struc:ur .:Lel and understooc

:,==.2 if lob descrip

(pr administering occupational programs is

'7 all operating within the structure. .ns

roles correspond with the administra-

t_

4.

Dermir. J

authority

(Drrelates with the responsibility at the

various levels of administ=ltion. 5.

Determine the effectiveness of vertical and horizontal communication

wihin tne adminislrxative

5-,:ructure.

7

Reference Data 1.

Guidelines Lir Annual Local

L.

C]:-20;

Rate your local

High

.

-al

s

.Liion, Part B, Sections 1 and 2, 1976 report.

.port of oc.Ipation

Aver-ge

Law

35

Major Goal V

:nstructional staff possess the necesEar: professional and rechnical qualifications required to administer and CC-7.:-.7_t the vocational program. -Objectives of Interview: 1.

2.

Determine the general.quafications of ocpational staff including: a.

Education (pre-servii,i and ill-service)

b.

Teaching experienc.:

c.

Work experience

d.

Knowledge of the

Determine if a formal sys=em for professioii staff dve.loi7==.-: exists

which may include prosiznf; for rhe

3.

a.

Periodic work experiece

b.

Periodic in-service tranz

c.

Participation In profes: 7.mal

d.

Contact with employers

e.

Visitation t:D other di-

ons

studer.=

_ores witn sinir program:s

Determine the quLility of wor..g

bet-weer. th.

staff and: a.

Other occupationa

b.

Non-occupational sr_i

c.

Guidance personnel

d.

Students

c.

Administrators

f.

Local Governing Boarc:

g

Community business and industrial 7-Jersonel

h.

Advisory committee_

3o1_:

-71amber

3

iccupational

Refercnce Data 1.

Guidelines.for Annual Local Evaluation, Part B, Sections 1 and 2, 1976 report.

2.

(1-3)

Highest earned degree OT faculty:

Less than Baccalaureate

Advance Certificate

Baccalaureate

Doctorate

Masters 3.

4.

(I-4)

(I-_ )

Types of certificates held: high school teaching

Administrative

Provisional vocational

Counseling

Supervisory

None

How many years of experience in occupational education have you had? 0-4 years

13-16 years

5-8 years

16 or more years

9-12 years 5.

(1-6)

How many years of occupational experience outside of education have

you had?

6.

(I-7,

None

5-8 years

Less than one year

9-12 years

1-4 years

More than 12 years

Are you presently a member of a professional organization related

to your field? Yes 7.

(1-10)

No

Are you currently involved in the leadership of a vocational youth

organization.

Yes

No

37

8.

(I-19)

Rate the working relationship among occupational instructors

across all occupational areas.

High 9.

(I-21)

Average

Low

Rate the working relationship between occupational instructors

and the following groups.

High

/Werage

Low

Academic Instructors Occupational_program administrators Labor and management personnel in government,

busines6 trade, etc. State and Local Governmental agencies

10.

(S-8)

I would rate my instructor's knowledge of the world of work as:

High

Average

Low

38

\

Major Goal VI Students have the opportunity to develop the necessary understandings and competencies as prescribed in the'program objectives through the use of properly equipped classrooms, shops and laboratories.

ObAectives for Interview: 1.

Determine the extent to which a multi-media instructional approach is used.

2.

Determine if the shop and laboratory equipment are comparable to that used on-the-job.

3.

Determine if adequate facilities and equipment are avaiiable so that all students have sufficient exposure to and use of the equipment.

39

Referencq. Data 1.

Cui

alines for Amaual Local Toraluation, Part B, Sections 1 and 2, 1976 report.

40

DIVISION INFORMATION 1.

Legal Name and Number of your Division

2.

Do citizens from your community serve on occupational education advisory committees? Yes No a.

If yes, is there:

one advisory committee for all occupational areas. a separate committee for 0441 area? (List.the separate occupa\- tional areas having advisory committees and the average number of meetings per year for each. both 3.

Indicate the number of students involved in each occupational organization (club) available to students in your district. Name of Organizations

FFA

(Future Farmers of America)

FHA

(Future Homemakers of America)

FBLA

(Future,Business Leaders of America)

VICA

(Vocational Industrial Clubs of America)

DECA

(Distributive Education Club of America)

HERO

(Home Economica Related Occupations)

Other 4.

What is the current unemployment rate for your area?

5.

What is the current youth unemployment rate for your area?

6.

What percentaf;e of your student .)opulation is enrolled in occurntional education?

7.

a.

Provide the current unduplicated enrollment for each of the occupatiOnal areas by grade level for your school. (Make sure that a student is not counted in more than one.class.)

41

(

%-- ,

.

/

0

8th Grade & Below /

9t, Grade

10th Grade

,

llth Grade

--12th Grade

Senior Intensified i

Continuing (Adult) .....

.

_.

b.

Total number of students enrolled in cooperative education programs

8.

What was last school year's dropokit rate for all high school students?

9.

What is the administration's estimate, by percentages, of graduates who enter? a.

four years of college

b,

two years post secondary (include all students committed to transferring to four year programs)

c.

one year post-secondary certificate program

d.

private career school

e.

immediate job placement (exclusive of Armed Forces)

42

10.

a.

With the exception of cooperative education students, does your school provide placement services for:

b.

11.

1.

:Unrolled students

Yes

No

2.

Dropouts

Yes

No

3.

Graduates

Yes

No

Who is responsible for placement and in which department is the placement:service located?

Does your school have a formal follow-up program that gives a picture of your entire student body? Yes No Only occupational students?

Yes

No

If yes to either of the above: a.

How often are follow-up studies conducted?

b.

Who is responsible for coordinating the follow-up study?

c.

Are the results of follow-up studies disseminated to the instructional staff? Yes No

d.

Additional comments:

12.

Do student, formally evaluate-their occupational courses and programs? Yes No

13.

Who receives a copy of the Annual Local Evaluation conducted each spring?

43

4.,

INSTRUCTOR INFORMATION I Personal Information 1.

2.

3.

4.

Your present primary position'is: a.

instruction

b.

counseling (advising)

c.

administration

If instruction, in which occupational area are you most involved? a.

not in instruction

b.

industrial oriented

c.

personal and public service

d.

.health

e.

business, marketing and management

f.

agriculture

g

cooperative education

Your highest earned degree is: a.

less than baccalaureate

b.

baccalaureate

c.

mavters

d.

advanced certificate

e.

doctorate

The type of certificate you hold is: .

a.

high school teaching

b.

provisional vocational

c.

supervisory

d.

administrative endorsement

e.

counseling

f.

pone

44

Mark only one)

.

How many years of (xperience in Occupational Education have you had? (Teaching, Guidance, Administration)

6.

a.

0-4 years

b.

5-8 years

c.

9-12 years

d.

13-16 years

e.

16 or more years

How many years of occupational experience, outside of education have you had?

.

7.

a.

none

b.

=less than one year

C.

1-4 years

d.

5-8 years

e.

9-12 years

f.

more than 12 years

Are you presentaly a membet of a professional organization related to

your field? No

Yes8.

9.

The nature of your last in-service experience was: a.

University course

b.

non-credit workshop (University or Business sponsored)

c.

non-credit workshop (school sponsored)

d.

occupational experience

e.

other

How long since your last occupational local division meetings?

m

a.

less than one year

b.

one to two years

more than two years

course, workshop, etc., other than

10.

Are you currently involved in leadership of a vocational youth organization? Yes

No

Program Information 11.

Are the occupational courses sequentially structured into programs? Yes

12.

No

Are there stated and measurable objectives for the division's total occupatioanl program? Yes

13.

No

Don't Itilow

Are you familiar with your institution's plan for identifying disadvantaged and handicapped students? Yes

14.

No

Are additior_al services provided for disadvantaged and hanr_capped student.,:

other than special education) No

15.

Not sure

Which term describes your local division's evaluation system for occupational -education? a.

Formal - a district - wide evaluation system exists which provides information for total program planning.

16.

b.

Informal - unrelated evaluation processes.

c.

Nona- no structured district - wide evaluation.

Were you involved in planning and/or making changes in your local division's one and five year plan for vocational and technical education? Extensively

Moderately Little None.

46

17.

Do guidance personnel and instructors work together in identifying students' needs and interests?

18.

a.

Extensively

b.

Moderately

c.

Little

d.

None

Rate the.guidance personnel's knowledge of occupational course and program offerings.

19.

a.

high

b.

Average - T.ome knowledge

c.

Low.- litt_e knowledge

ver- knowledgeabla

Late the working relationship among occupational instructdrs across all occupational areas.-

20.

a.

High cooperation

b.

Average cooperation

c.

Low cooperation

Rate your local'board's support of occupational education. a.

21.

gh - strong support

b.

Average - generally supportive

c.

Low - little support

Aate the working relatIonship between occupational instructors and the following groups: A.

Academic Instructors a.

High - most cooperate

b.

Average - some cooperate

c.

Low - few cooperate

47

21.

Rate the working relationship between occupational instructors and the following groups: B.

C.

(continued)

Occupational Program Admillistrators a.

High cooperation

b.

Average cooperation

c.

Low cooperat

Labor and management personnel in government, business, trade, commerce, etc., in the communl=v.

D.

a.

High cooperation

b.

Average cooperation

c.

Low cooperation

State and Local Go-Jernmental Agencies a.

High cooperation

b.

Average cooperation

c.

Low cooperation

48

STUDENT INFORMATION

1.

I am enrolled in: a.

13.

3.

business education

c.

distributive education

d.

health education

'e.

2.

agriculture education

consumer home economics'

f.

occupational home econoMiCs

a

trade and industrial education

The grade I am in is: a.

freshman (9th)

b.

sophomore (10th)

c.

junior (11th)

d.

seni.f (i2th)

e.

13th (college)

f.

14th (college)

I am a member of a vocational,student organization such as FFA, VICA, FHA, DECA, etc. a.

no

b.

yes, meets more than once a month

c.

yes, meets once a month yep, meets 2 or 3 times a semester

e.

yes, meets 2 or 3-times a year

f.

yes, meets less than three times a year

49

4.

,5.

6.

Last year I met with a counselor: a.

more than 5 times

b.

4 to 5 times

c.

2 or 3 times

d.

once

e.

never

I would rate my cOunselor's knowledge of the world of work: a.

High - knows about most occupations

b.

Average - knows about some occupations

c.

Below average - knows very little about occupations

d.

I don't know - never talked :11.i,,zt

I would rate th

oczu?at--x1.3.

L toriticri I have receiveL from counselors with regard

to my future occupation:

7.

a.

High - consider-_ble

b.

Average - some

c.

Low - little or none

In addition to your own personal interest, who encouraged you the most to

enroll in the occupatieil program you are now taking? (Mark only one)

.

/

8.

a.

Instructor or :.Idainistrator

b.

Guidance counselor

c.

Friend(s)

d.

Parent

e.

None of the above

1. would rate my instructor's knowledge of the world of work: a.

High - knows about occupations

b.

Average - knows something about occupations

c.

Below average - knows very little about occupations

50

9.

10.

Are you aware of occupational program and course objectives? a.

Yes

b.

No

c.

Some

Do you feel your instructor(s) have clearly explained the objectives and goals of your occupational courses?

-11.

12.

13.

14.

a.

Yes

b.

No

Do )77,12:

current occupational courses relate to your chosen career goal? a.

Yes

b.

No

c.

Somewhat

Rate your program in terms of preparation for an occupation: a.

High - it will help me find and maintain a job

b.

Average - it may help me find and maintain a job

c.

Low - it will not help me find and maintain a,job

Would you recommend the occupational program you are in to a friend? a.

Yes

b.

No

Do you expect to:

(mark only one)

a.

Get a job doing what you are learning?

b.

Get a job similar to the one you are learning?

c.

Continue st'Uclying about tbe same job at another school after

graduation? d. 15.

Make little use of what you are learning?

Would you like to change to another occupational prograe a.

Yes

b.

No

51

6.

17.

18.

Is your preferred program available? a.

Yes

b.

No

Is it possible to change programs if you want to? a.

Yes

b.

No

Is it possible to change programs at mid year? a.

Yes

Appendix C

Annual Local Evaluation for

Vocational and Technical Education

53

Annual Local Evaluation

of Vocational and Technical Education

Procedures and forms for conducting an annual evaluation of vocational and technical education programs

Division of Vocational Education State Department of Education Richmond, Virginia 23216

1976

5I

ANNUAL LOCAL EVALUATION OF VOCATIONAL AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION

Procedures and Forms for Conducting an Annual Evaluation of Vocational and Technical Education Programs

February 1976

Developed by Donald E. Elson, Ph.D. Division of Vocational and Techni:al Education College of Education Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University Blacksburg, Virginia 24061

in cooperation with

Division of Vocational Education State Department of Education Richmond, Virginia 23216

55.

' PREFACE

What is evaluation? There have been several definitions given but one of the better definitions has been stated by Daniel Stufflebeam: Educational evaluation is the process of delineating, obtaining, and provtding useful information for Judging decision alternatives. It should be stressed that evaluation is for "judging decision alternatives." Thus, the purpose of evaluation is not to prove, but to improve. Who should evaluate? An evaluation ought to be done by those who are responsible for the improvement of the program. Therefore, the teachers, supervisors, and administrators of vocational education with the advice of advisory committees should be the evaluators of vocational education programs

The procedures incorporated in the Annual Local Evaluation were developed with the above definition and purpose in mind. Every effort is made to provide a systematic, organized approach which will involve all staff members in a school division with responsibilities in vocational and technical education. Appreciation is expressed to the staff of the Division of Vocational Education, State Department of Education, and to Donald E. Elson, assistant professor and other faculty members of the College of Education, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, who gave their valuable assistance in the development of this evaluation procedure.

George S. Orr, Jr. State Director Division of Vocational 2ducation

56

EVALUATING VOCATIONAL EDUCATION Introduction 'The Standards of Quality and Obje-xives for Public Schools in Virginia, 1974-76 present guidelines for dev4oping the planning capabilities in local school divisions. The following quote is taken from Standard No. 8, FiveYear School Improvement Plan:

Each school division shall involve the staff and community in revising and extending annually the five-year school improvement plan to be submitted to and approved by the Board of Education on July one, ... (of each year)*. This plan shall include: a. The objectives of the school division stated in terms of student performance; b. An assessment of the extent to which the objectives are being achieved, including follow-up studies of former students; ana c. Strategies for achiering the objectives of the school division, including an organized program for staff improvement. A systematic procedure has been developed for evaluating and planning local vocational education programs to assist the localities in meeting this standard. Phase One of the system deals with program planning and requiresL that the updated five-year improvement plan for vocational education be filed with the Division of Vocational Education on January 15* of each year. Phase Two is concerned with the implementation and operation of the planned vocational education programs. Data are collected in Phase Two by the Vocational Education Reporting System (VERS) to verify the enrollment au' operation of the planned programs. Phase Three is the Annual Local Evaluation which is an evaluation of the total vocational education program in a school division and serves as a basis for the school division's update of the fiveyear plan for vocational education due January 15/each year. .

Annual Local Evaluation The Annual Local Evaluation is a systematic procedure for evaluating the vocational education programs in the school divisions. It is not an evaluation of teachers. The emphasis of the Annual Local Evaluation is on the total offering of vocational education by the school division as well as the various vocational.programs. This evaluation procedure considers the three major aspects of vocational education -- occupational preparation (job entry), consumer and homemaking education, and orientation and exploration programs -while pl..cing stress on the regular, disadvantaged, and handicapped secondary and adult students to be served.

*The vocational education section is due on the January 15 preceding the July 1 date for the five-year school improvement plan. The Department of Education is currently proposing (subject to General.Assembly revision) that the date for submitting the.total five year school improvement plan be changed to January 15, effective in 1977, making all plans due on that date, and each January 15.thereafter.

-2-

57

The Annual Local Evaluation assists local school divisions in assessing the major strengths and major weaknesses of the vocational education programs and in making recommendations for program improvement. Since this evaluation takes place many months before the Five-Year Improvement Plan is finalized, the school division is requested to again state the major strengths as a part of the Plan. The major weaknesses phould be covered through the objectives and strategies in the Plan. The Division of Vocational Education suggests the following five major goals for vocational education to the local school divisions. The Guidelines for Annual Local Evaluation - Part A, Curriculum and Instruction are directly related to these goal statements. Consistent with their abilities, interests, and education needs: 1.

Youths and adults will acquire the skills and knowledge needed for initial and continuing employment or self-employment in occupations of their choice and for which there are employment opportunities.

2.

Youths and adults will acquire the competencies needed as consumers of goods and services, for home and family living, and for personal use.

3.

Youths and adults will become aware of employment or self-employment opportunities and requirements for use in making career choices and in determining their educational programs.

4.

Youths and adults will exhibit pride in work well done; confidence in ability to perform in the world of work; and develop leadership abilities, responsible citizenship, and a realistic self-image in relation to work in their chosen vocation.

5.

Youths and adults will benefit from programs improved and expanded through ancillary activities, including teacher education, research, guidance, supervision, planning and evaluation.

Since vocational education is the joint effort of State and local educational agencies, a school division can adopt, revise, and/or refine any or all of these goals and can develop other goals in addition to these five goals.

-3-

58

ASSESSMENT OF PROGRESS MADE TOWARD OBJECTIVES The development of a meaningful five year improvement plan by the local school division requires assessment beyond the scope of the Annual Local Evaluation to fully assess progress made and the remaining local needs in terms of each goal adopted for votational education. School divisions are asked to make this assessment of progress twice each year - once at the time the Annual Local Evaluation Report is submitted (covering January tc June) and again when the Five Year Improvement Plan is submitted (covering July to December).

An example of the form for submitting this assessment of progress will be found on Page 17. Copies of this form were supplied to the school division at the time this booklet was distributed. Suggested Vocational Committee Structure

Decions by committees with individual input by teachers are important in evUuation. The recommendations

to be developed by this procedure are based ou the work of committees at the vocational department level within a school, at the school- level, and atthe division level. All vocational teachers will have a direct input by completing the Guidelines for Annual Local Evaluation -- Part A Curriculum and Instruction. Students, former students, employers,.and other lay persons of the community will be active participants in the evaluation of the local vocational education programs by serving as members of advisory committeea.

Since school divisions vary in size and organizational structure, the following committee structure for the annual evaluation of the vocational education programs is suggested as a good procedure to consider. School divisions will want to vary the procedure to.meet their own individual needs.

Division Vocational Education Comitittee Suggested Membership: Director of Vocational Education for school division (chairman) One teacher from each vocational service One coordinator or supervisor from each vocational service One member of the Planning Council Supervisor of guidance for school division Chairman of the Division Vocational Education Advisory Committee -

Responsit;ilities:

Receive recommendations for improvement of the vocational education programs from the School Vocational Education Committees. Study these recommendations, analyze additional data as required, and evaluate the total vocational program. Make final set of recommendations for vocational education in the division to the Division Superintendpnt. Final recommendations should be reviewed with the Vocational Education Advisory Committee. Update, annually, the five-year plan for vocational education.

59

Division Advisory Committee Suggested Membership: General Advisory Committee for Vocational Education 21us the following if not presently on the committee: One employed former student from each vocational service One currently enrolled student from each vocational service Responsibilities: Assist and advise the Division Vocational Education Committee

School Vocational Education Committee A separate committee is needed for each school offering vocational programa in the division. This committee is not necessary in divisions having only one high school. Suggested Membership: Head teacher from each vocational department in school (designate one as chairman) (If school is a Vocational Center, the principal should be chairman) Coordinator of guidance in school. One member of Division Vocational Educw-ion Committee Responsibilities: Receive recommendations from the Department Committees. Study the recommendations, analyze addltional data as required, and evaluate total vocational program in school using Guidelines for Annual Local Evaluation - Part B. In schools where use of the Department Committee is not feasible, this committee will assume the duties of the Department Committee (refer to section on Department Committees). After review by school principal, make final set of recommendations for vocational education in the school to the Division Vocational Education Committee using Cuidelines for Annual Local Evaluation - Part B.

Department Committees A separate committee may be established for each vocational department in area vocational centers and comprehensive high schouls. The School Vocational Education Committee may assume the duties of this committee in small schools where such a committee is not feasible. Suggested Membership: Supervisor and/or head teacher of department in school (chairman) All.teachers in department Responsibilities: Analyze needed data and the Guidelines for Annual Local Evaluation Part A which were completed by each teacher in the department. Develop set of recommendations for the department to be given to the School Vocational Education Committee using Guidelines for Annual Local Evaluation - Part B.

60 -5,

_e.'111105

Data Requirements for Local Evaluation and Planning Sound evaluation and planning of vocational offerings which are relevant to the needs of students and to employment opportunities require a variety of data. The following types of data should be thoroughly studied during the process of evaluating the vocational programs.

1.

Follow-up of former students by vocational service

2.

Description of school population (see suggested catagories below)

Descri.tion of School Po.u_ation A.

1974*

Present**

Protected 5 years

1 year

Age* (1) 1-5 (2) 6-15 (3) .16-19

(4) Adult B.

Sex* (1) Male (2) Female .6g

C.

Ethnic Groups*

(1) Negro or Black (2) White (3) Other D.

Disadvantaged (1) Academic (2) Economic (3) Cultural

E.

,

Handicapped*** (1) Deaf (2) Blind (3) Speech defect (4) Crippling condition (5) Convulsive seizure (6) Mentally retarded (7) Emotionally distrubed

*Data available from Virginia School Census - 1974 **Present actual data or projected data from past data ***Survey made locally for Special Education

-6-

3.

VERS data applicable to local school division

4.

Student needs and interest in vocational education*

5.

Attitudinal data from students, parents, and employers

6.

Maneower data for area -- present and projected

7.

Present philosophy and objectives of the Division School Board pertaining to vocational education.

Most of the above data will be available through the principal's office since the five-year school improvement plan requires these data.

*Vocational Education Student Demand Projection System (adWscription of each vocational course available in Virginia and a system to use in determining student interest) is available from the State Division of Vocational Education.

62 -7-

GUIDELINES FOR ANNUAL LOCAL EVALUATION

Summary of Instructions

The forms, Guidelines for Annual Local Evaluation - Part A Curriculum and Instruction and Part B, Summarization, are included in this booklet. Part A is to be completed by each vocational teacher. Part B is

o be completed by the Department Committees, the School Vocational Education Committes, and the Division Vocational Education Committee. Only one evaluation summary report of the school division (Guidelines for Annual Local Evaluation - Part B) will be sent to the Director, Division of Vocational Education, State Department of Education, by July 1. The purpose of this report is to indicate to the Division of Vocational Education that the school divisions are following an organized approach to eValuation and the five-year program improvement plan reflects the recommendations resulting from the evaluation. The report will be used by the Division of Vocational Education to assist the local school divisions in program improvement.

Part A -- Curriculum and Instruction Detailed Instructions

The Guidelines for Annual Local Evaluation_-_ Part A is to be used by the individual teachers to evaluate their programs. Each vocational teacher in Ihe school division should complete this form and submit a set of recommendations for his or her program to the most specialized committee used for evaluating vocational education in the school division. Individual ratings are to go no further than this committee. It is important to remember that this is an evaluatton of the program and not an evaluation of teachers. One original copy of the form is included in this booklet and a second copy will be provided separately. Complete both copies. You are to keep the copy included in the bcoklet on file so that you may review the ratings with your administrator and supervisory personnel when appropriate. The separate'copy is to be submitted to the Department Committee or School Committee. The Guidelines have been organized into four sections. Section I includes statements related to Major Goals 1 and 2. Sections II, III, and IV, relate to Major Goals 3, 4, and 5, respectively.

63

Part A -- Curriculum and Instruction (Continued) 1.

Work with one guideline at a time.

B.

Study each guideline and make notes as to what evidence is available or needed to make an evalution and to substantiate that evaluation. Collect and analyze needed data (share data to avoid duplication of

C.

Assign each guideline an evaluative rating using the following code:

A.

effort).

M = Major improvement needed- critical weakness or inadequacy Use exists in meeting the minimum standard for the guideline. this rating if a program or service is needed but i not being provided by your department. I = Improvement needed - with minor changes the program could be improved to meet the minimum standard- for the guideline. S = Program meets the minimum standard for the guideline. E = Program exceeds the minimum standard for the guideline. NA = Not applicable. Use only where the purposes of the program being evaluated differ from the guideline. Do not use this rating if a program or service is needed but is not provided by your department. 2.

3.

The ratings are not to be summarized; they are to be used tO direct your thinking toward listing: (1) the major strengths and.the major weaknesses of your program by Section and (2) your recommendations for program improvement by Section. Develop a set of recommendations using the Guidelines, the listing of the strengths and weaknesses, and other evaluative data for each Section of the Guidelines. Recommendations for improvement of the vocational education program should originate with the vocational teachers in a vocational department. It will be helpful if information concerning student needs and employment demands is available to vocational teachers.

64 -9-

GUIDELINES FOR ANNUAL LOCAL EVALUATION

PAK A - CUrriculum and Instruction Division: School: Note:

I.

Rating Form "Student" refers to both those in secondary school programs as well as adult programs.

ACQUISITION OF SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE NEEDED FOR INITIAL AND CONTINUING EMPLOYMENT OR SELF-EMPLOYMENT AND COMPETENCIES NEEDED AS CONSUMERS OF GOODS AND SERVICES, FOR HOME AND FAMILY LIVING, AND FOR PERSONAL USE. Ratings*

1.

The objectives of the program are stated in terms which are measurable. 1.

2.

The program is meeting the needs of those in the following groups who are interested in and need such training: A. B. C. D. E. F.

3.

4.

disadvantaged youth disadvantaged adults handicapped youth handicapped adults secondary ybuth in regular programs adults in regular programs

At least seventy-five percent of the students enrolling in the program continue through to completion.

2.A. B.

C.

D. E. F.

3.

Between seventy-five and ninety percent of the students completing the program or leaving school prior to completion with a marketableskill and available for employment, find employment in the field for which trained or closely related field. 4.

5.

Students preparing for direct entry into an occupation or vo.ation exhibit a mastery of: A. B. C. D.

6.

required knowledge and skills necessary communication skills necessary computational skills competencies needed as consumers' of goods and services

Measurable performance objectives based on the of the occupation or vocation are used in all requirements courses.

5.A. B. C. D.

6.

*M = major improvement needed; I = improvement needed; S = program meets minimum standard for guideline; E = program exceeds the minimum standard for the guideline; NA = not appliCable.

-10-

GUIDELINES FOR ANNUAL LOCAL EVALUATION (Continued)

Ratings*

Practices and situations found in business Pnd industry are replicated or simulated in the classroom and laboratory.

7.

8.

Individualized instruction is used extensively.

8.

9.

Facilities and resources outside the school environment are used when appropriate to enrich the learning experience.

9.

7.

10.

Cooperative occupational experience under the supervision of the instructor is available to students.

10.

11.

Senior intensified programs are available for those students who at the end of their junior year or beginning of their senior year find that they need special training before they can enter the labor market. (Applicable in same but not all 11. school divisions.)

12.

Various ability levels and learning speeds may be accommodated in the curriculum.

12.

Time is allowed for students to acquire, practice, and apply manipulative skills, technical knowledge, and related subject matter essential to qualify them for employment or homemaking.

13.

13.

14.

Students on cooperative occupational experience and their employers are visited regularly by the instructors who have time assigned in their school schedule for this activity.

14.

Instructors assist students in obtaining part-time employment to improve skills and/or remain in school.

15.

Instructors assist students.(secondary and adult) to find full-time employment after completing program.

16.

Equipment, materials and facilities are available to support the multi-media approach to instruction.

17.

Instructional materials are up-to-date and are on the level of the students.

18.

19.

Class size does not exceed recommended maximum enrollments.

19.

20.

The number of students in a class does not exceed the number 20. of complete work stations available.

21.

All tools, equipment, and supplies meet the standards of and are comparable to those used in the occupation or

15.

16.

17.

18.

21.

vocation.

program meets prograM exceeds the minimum standard

1414 = major improvement needed; I ts'improvement needed; S.

minimum standard for guidelines; E

for the guideline; tA R not aPpliC-able.:

'GUIDELINES FOR ANNUAL LOCAL EVALUATION cContinued) 22.

II.

Ratings*

All instructional facilities are of adequate size to provide for safe, orderly, and effective instruction.

22.

PROGRAM CHOICES, CAREER CHOICES AND OPPORTUNITIES FOR EMPLOYMENT

23.

The stated goals and objec:Aves of each vocational course are made known to the students before the time of enrollment. 23.

24.

All students have an equal opportunity to select and to enroll in the program and/or courses of their choices.

25.

24.

Students are provided information with which they may confirm or modify their occUpational choice early in the program. 25.

26.

III. 27.

Students are provided with career counseling activities that lead to career decision making.

WORK ETHICS, LEADERSHIP ABILITIES AND POSITIVE SELF-IMAGE The curriculum of programs preparing students for direct entry into an occupation or vocation is designed to develop: A. B. C.

D. E. F.

G. H.

28.

IV.

29.

30.

proper work habits and attitudes pride in workmanship proper personal dress, grooming habits, and decorum understanding of appropriate employer-employee relationships. understanding of appropriate employee-employee relationships. knowledge of personal and business ethics. understanding of appropriate public relations. habits of good health and safety practices.

Vocational Education organizations for both youth and/or adults are an integral part of the curriculum.

ANCILLARY ACTIVITIES:

27.A. B. C.

D. E. F.

G. H.

28.

RESEARCH, INSTRUCTIONAL IMPROVEMENT, ADVISORY COMMITTEES

Advisory Committees or community groups assist in developing and support the total plan for the preparation of in the occupation(s) or vocation(s) being taught. students

29.

New instructional methods are tried in an effort.to increase the efficiency of learning.

30.

*M major improvement needed; I improvement needed; S program meets minimum standard for guideline; E program exceeds the minimum standard -for the guideline; NA = not applicable.

-12-

GUIDELINES FOR ANNUAL LOCAL EVALUATION (Continued) .

31.

The following factors provide a guide to the relevancy and extent to which the objectives of the program are being met: A.

B. C.

D. E. F.

G.

Former students express a high degree of satisfaction with the program. Former studclits express a high degree of satisfaction with their present job.

31.A.

Em7 ,-.. yers express a Eaigh degree of satisaction with former students in their employ. Studen.:s have positive attitudes toward the program. Parents have positive attitudes toward the program. Employers have positive attitudes toward the program.

C. D. E.

B.

F.

School administrators have positive attitudes toward the program.

The above ratings were based on: (Check those which apply) 32.

Ratings

1. 2.

G.

actual studies informal observations

Research or development projects have been undertaken to improve: A. B. C.

D.

program offerings course content program outcomes data base for evaluation

32.A. B. C.

.

D.

FORMAT FOR REPORTING STRENGTHS, WEAKNESSES, AND RECOMMENDATIONS Follow the format shown below in submitting the report on separate sheet(s) of paper and attach to this form. List major strengths by Sections: Use items rated as "E" as guides, but do not limit the list to those items'. I: Section Skills, Knowledge and Competencies Section II: Choices and Employment Opportunities Section III: Work Ethics, Leadership Abilities and Self-Image Section .IV: Ancillary Activities List ma or weaknesses b y Sections: Use items rated "M" or "I" as guides, but do not limit the list to those items.

Section I: Section II: Section III: Section IV:

Skills, Knowledge and Competencies Choices and Employment Opportunities Work Ethics, Leadership Abilities and Self-Image Ancillary Activities Recommendations for Improvement by Sections: Q

Section I: Section II: Section III: Section IV:'

Skills, Knowledge and Competencies Choices and Employment Opportunities Work Ethics, Leadership Abilities and Self-Image Ancillary Activities -13-

T

176

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to t unc ion in a school ca,7L oc Lhe Guidelinos for Annual ..,cd1 A for his or program and submit it ro the Scaool VocaCommi t tee The School Vocational Education Committee's reusing Guidelines for Annual Local Evaluation Part B, Section dre give:, to t_ho Division Vocational Education Committee. ,ei

.

(:ompleto a

i it

,

1).).'

of

.

Comlicee, L,iing Guidelines for Annual Local Evaluation, Lae recommendations tor improving vocational edo-ichool division. the larger school divisions, the final

-Ion

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,d:ina in the topor:.

ot rcomendations, where practical, :-:hould contain a sub-report for ':ht`!-;t.

call j:

roport.

wi 11 be very helpf ul

t o

ste st1;,..rvi

:in, ,fH;fauce to the program Jrea ,old the scnool . :

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a1::o completed hv :he Division Committee. !->oction 2 21-0 miode toward the achiP%ement ot rhe modHurdbio objectives listed In the 1975 -7b Five -Yedr Vocacat

1.;:yru01.ruent

(:c,-!:0;1 :.,nt

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Oiviioh ,ommittee will ,:ubmit two sets of the recommendations I) with the recommendations trom each school attached and

the assesstne objectivei; (:;ect-Lon 2), t-) the division superintendent or his ,hle set ot

the division's recommendations do not include recom!tom local schools is signed and sent along with a copy of the a,:se,,ment to the Director, Division of Vocational Education, State Department ot EducAtion, bv Juiv 1. Copies of th^ division's approved recommendations ahoLlid be 'ciitributed to all vocational teacher. ::;clida:loa

reoilts of the recommendation Inc

rv

tf

;,,,:a[c of the Five-iear Program

should be refleted as objectles in

Improvement Plan due the following January the division of Vocational Education, State Department of Education.

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