Columbia University bulletin : postgraduate courses for dentists

Columbia University Bulletin SERIES 61 NUMBER 2 JANUARY FACULTY OF DENTAL 14, 1961 & ORAL SURGERY Postgraduate Courses for Dentists 1961-19...

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Columbia University Bulletin SERIES

61

NUMBER

2

JANUARY

FACULTY OF DENTAL

14,

1961

& ORAL

SURGERY

Postgraduate

Courses for Dentists 1961-1962

Digitized by the Internet Archive in

2011 with funding from

Open Knowledge Commons

http://www.archive.org/details/columbiaunive19611962colu

Columbia University Faculty of Dental and Oral Surgery

Postgraduate

Courses for Dentists

1961-1962

Contents ACADEMIC CALENDAR FACULTY OF DENTAL

3

AND ORAL SURGERY

4

SECTION

1.

COURSES FOR GENERAL PRACTITIONERS

SECTION

2.

COURSES FOR ORTHODONTISTS

SECTION

3.

PROGRAMS

Oral Medicine,

IN

7

DENTAL SPECIALTIES Oral Surgery,

8.

5

8

Orthodontics, 11.

9.

Pedodontics, 13.

Pedodontics: Cerebral Palsy Clinical Fellowship in Dentistry, 15.

Periodontology SECTION

4.

—Full-Time,

18.

Periodontology

TRAINING IN A BASIC MEDICAL SCIENCE

ADMISSION, REGISTRATION,

For Section

1

AND

Training, 27.

19.

22

23

FEES

and 2 Courses, 23.

Statements of Attendance, 27.

—Half-Time,

For Section

3 Programs, 23.

Requirements for the Certificate of

Housing, 27.

OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION

28

Columbia University Bulletin Issued at Columbia University, five consecutive issues.



Series 61

New York



Number

2

New

January 14, 1961

from January for fortyYork, N.Y. h

27, N.Y., weekly

Second-class postage paid at



Academic Calendar, FIRST

Sept

13

1961-1962

TERM

Wednesday. Registration, including payment of fees, for all students except those who began the program in orthodontics in September, I960.*

1

Oct

4

25

Nov

7 23

Dec

Term begins. Wednesday. Award of October certificates. Thursday.

Tuesday. Election Day. Holiday.

Thursday. Thanksgiving Day. Holiday. Friday. Last day for filing application or renewal of application for

1

certificates to

Jan

all

be awarded in February, t

24

Sunday, through January

1

Wednesday. Term ends. End of program

7,

1

962, Sunday.

Christmas holidays. in orthodontics

begun

in Sep-

tember, 1960.

SECOND TERM

Term begins.

Jan

1 1

Thursday.

Feb

22

Thursday. Washington's Birthday. Holiday.

28

Wednesday. Award of February

Mar

Thursday. Last day for

1

all certificates

to be

will automatically

Apr

1

May

23

5

certificates.

filing application

awarded

or renewal of application for

in June;t applications received after

May

1

be applied to the next conferral date.

Sunday, through April 22, Sunday.

Easter holidays.

Wednesday. Term ends. End of programs in oral medicine and pedodontics (full-time) begun in September, 1961; in pedodontics (half-time), periodontology (full-time), and cerebral palsy begun in September, 1960; and in periodontology (half-time) begun in September, 1958.

THIRD TERM

May

Term

begins in oral surgery and orthodontics.

24

Thursday.

30

Wednesday. Memorial Day. Holiday.

Commencement Day.

Award

June

June

5

Tuesday.

July

4

Wednesday. Independence Day. Holiday.

Aug

1

Sept

3

Monday. Labor Day. Holiday.

5

Wednesday. Third term ends in oral surgery. End of the program oral surgery begun in September, 1960.

*

t

of

certificates.

Wednesday. Last day for filing application or renewal of application for all certificates to be awarded in October.f

Students allowed to register after the day specified must pay a late fee, Students who file application after this date must pay a late fee.

in

The Faculty of Dental and Oral Surgery Grayson Kirk, Ph.D., LL.D.

President of the University

John A. Krout, Ph.D., L.H.D., LL.D.

Dean

Jacques Barzun, Ph.D.

H. Houston Merritt, M.D.

of Faculties and Provost of the University

Vice President in Charge of Medical Affairs

Dean

Gilbert P. Smith, D.D.S.

Howard A. Arden, D.D.S.

Associate Professor of Dentistry

Frank E. Beube, L.D.S., D.D.S.

Edward A. Cain, Wilfred

Jr.,

Vice President of the University

D.D.S.

Clinical Professor of Dentistry

Associate Professor of Dentistry

M. Copenhaver, Ph.D.

Joseph A. Cuttita, D.D.S.

Professor of

Associate Professor of Dentistry

Nicholas A. Di Salvo, D.D.S., Ph.D.

Rudolph H. Friedrich, D.D.S. Harry A. Galton, D.D.S.

Anatomy

Professor of Dentistry

Professor of Dentistry

Clinical Professor of Dentistry

Magnus I. Gregersen, Ph.D.

Dalton Professor of Physiology

Robert E. Herlands, D.D.S.

Professor of Dentistry

John

J.

Lucca, D.D.S.

Associate Professor of Dentistry

Donald G. McKay, M.D. David Rittenberg, Ph.D. Harry M. Rose, M.D.

Delafield Professor of Pathology

Professor of Biochemistry

John E. Borne Professor of Microbiology

Solomon N. Rosenstein, D.D.S. William

J.

Savoy, D.D.S.

Laszlo Schwartz, D.D.S.

Harry P. Smith, M.D. Frances A.

Stoll,

Ed.D.

Clinical Professor of Dentistry Clinical Professor of Dentistry

Delafield Professor of Pathology

Professor of Dental Hygiene

Harry B. van Dyke, Ph.D., M.D.

Edward V.

Professor of Dentistry

Zegarelli, D.D.S.

Hosack Professor of Pharmacology

Edwin

S.

Robinson Professor of Dentistry

Section

i

Courses for General Practitioners Through these courses, the general practitioner may carry on advanced study in special fields and keep abreast of new developments in technique and theory. Particular emphasis is placed on clinical practice. For admission requirements and procedure, and information about and fees, see page 23.

The

courses are not designed to lead to specialization.

registration

They may not be counted

for credit toward any degree or certificate conferred by the University.

The University

reserves the right to withdraw or

modify the courses of instruction

or to change the instructors at any time. Classes do not meet on University holidays or during University vacations.

PD 402.

Preventive orthodontics.

Professors Di Salvo,

Monday-Friday, 9-12 and 1-5.

July 10-14, 1961.

Spengeman, and

staff

Tuition, $200.

Lectures and laboratory. Orthodontic fundamentals with special emphasis on the prevention of malocclusion by the early recognition and correction of the disposing factors. Laboratory time is devoted to the design and construction of fixed and removable appliances used as space maintainers. In addition, simple appliances are constructed which are used in tooth guidance procedures and considered to be within the province of the general practitioner of dentistry.

PD 403.

Diagnosis.

September

15,

Professor Zegarelli

1961—May

18, 1962.

Fridays, 1-3.

Tuition, $250.

A

seminar in which the diseases of the mouth, jawbones, and related structures are comprehensively described and discussed. The application of basic scientific knowledge is emphasized in order to provide a clearer and more practical understanding. Cost of books: about $32.

PD 409. Periodontology. Professor Beube September 13, 1961 May 16, 1962. Wednesdays, 1-4.



Tuition, $250.

Lectures, discussions, and both clinical and pictorial demonstrations on (1) the diagnosis, charting, and treatment planning of periodontal diseases; (2) nutritional and metabolic factors; and (3) development of periodontal methods. Clinical practice includes conservative treatment, surgical treatment, and occlusal adjustment. Cost of instruments: about $180.

PD 409A.

Periodontology.

September

13,

1961

Professor Beube

—May

16,

1962.

Wednesdays, 9-12 and 1-4.

Tuition,

$500.

PD

409 with ninety hours of additional

PD 432. June

Temporomandibular 1

1-13, 1962.

clinical practice.

joint disorders.

Professor Schwartz

Monday-Wednesday, 9-12 and

1-4.

Tuition, $200.

Lectures, discussions, and demonstrations on the diagnosis and treatment of temporomandibular joint disorders. Included are a study of the clinical physiology and pathology of the temporomandibular joint and the relationship between temporomandibular joint disorders and the occlusion of the teeth.

6

COURSES FOR GENERAL PRACTITIONERS In diagnosis, the history, physical examination, and the use of radiology and electromyography are included. In treatment, the application of the knowledge and techniques in the use of therapeutic exercises and local anesthetics is demonstrated.

PD 353. Theory and practice of pedodontics. Professor Rosenstein September 15, 1961—May 17, 1962. Thursdays, 9:30-11:30.

Tuition, $250.

term: lectures and conferences on all factors relating to treatment planning and measures for control of oral diseases in children. Spring term: conferences on prevention of disease and disorders of the teeth and surrounding structures in children, including reports on pertinent literature and research, with the purpose of incorporating sound measures for preventive dentistry in planning treatment for children.

Autumn

Section

2

Courses for Orthodontists These courses provide opportunities for practicing orthodontists to become better prepared in certain technical and clinical aspects of their specialty.

For admission requirements and procedure, and information about and payment of fees, see page 23. Enrollment in all courses is limited.

The

registration

University reserves the right to withdraw or modify the courses of instruc-

tion or to

change the instructors as

may be

necessary.

PD419. Twin-wire appliance therapy. Dr. Johnson December 4-8, 1961. Monday-Friday, 9-12 and 1-5.

Tuition, $250.

Lectures and technical training in the construction of anterior and molar bands, tubular lingual arches, staple Ungual arches, the twin-wire arch mechanism, and a working retainer, and the basic principles of treatment associated with the application of twin-wire appliance therapy for the correction of the malocclusion of the teeth. Cost of instruments: about $175.

PD 422.

Professor Whitman Monday-Friday, 9-12 and 1-5, 6-8; Saturday, 9-12.

Edgewise appliance therapy.

March 5-10,

1962.

Tuition, $250. The technique

of constructing and assembling the edgewise appliance, its application and manipulaand the philosophy governing its use in the treatment of various types of malocclusions. wealth of visual-aid material slides, movies, charts is used, and the laboratory technique is supplemented by observation of patients in various stages of treatment. Through lectures, discussions, and question-and-answer periods, the specialist becomes acquainted with every phase of the edgewise technique and its most recent refinements including multiple-loop and light-wire techniques. Efficiency and time-saving methods in its use are emphasized throughout the course. The essentials of the theory are included, but stress is put on what will be of greatest practical value to the orthodontist. Lectures in diagnosis, and in the anatomy of the head and neck (by Dr. Harry Shapiro) are also included. Cost of instruments and books: about $385. tion,

PD 427.



Applied roentgenographs cephalometry.

March 14-16, 1962. The theory and

A



Professor

Wednesday-Friday, 9-12 and 1-5.

Nahoum Tuition, $100.

practice of taking standardized head roentgenograms utilizing a cephalostat, laboratory practice in the methods of making tracings, and the clinical evaluation of the headfilms. Included are discussions of diagnostic procedures in cephalometrics according to the analyses of Downs, Margolis, Sassouni, Steiner, and Wylie, and lectures on the anatomy of the skull, anthropology, principles of roentgenology, and clinical photography. Emphasis is placed on the practical application of cephalometric techniques in orthodontic diagnosis. Cost of instruments: about $25.

Section

3

Programs These programs lead to a

Dental Specialties

in

certificate of training

and are based on the need for

bet-

They are intended to provide opportunities The training received may be counted toward

ter qualified practitioners of dentistry.

for advanced study in special fields. specialization.

Admission requirements and procedure, information about

registration,

and the

schedule of fees are given on pages 23-26.

The

University reserves the right to withdraw or modify the courses of instruction

or to change the instructors at any time.

PROGRAM

ORAL MEDICINE

IN

A one-year program in the

theory and practice of oral medicine designed to pre-

pare dentists for specialized practice or clinical teaching.

FIRST TERM: SEPTEMBER 14, 1961, TO JANUARY 10, 1962

CT 300.

Biological principles of dentistry.

Professor Di Salvo

and

staff

This course integrates the various basic sciences and correlates them with the clinical practice of dentistry. It is predicated on the assumption that dentists, regardless of specialty, must acquire a general knowledge of the body as a whole and a thorough and comprehensive understanding of the oral cavity and its contents. Three hours per week.

CT 303.

Clinical practice in oral medicine.

Professor Zegarelli

Clinical practice in history-taking, comprehensive oral diagnosis, treatment planning, roentgenologic interpretation, diagnosis of pulp abnormalities and diseases of the mouth and jawbones. Six sessions

per week.

CT 329.

Diagnosis.

Professor Zegarelli

A

comprehensive description and discussion of the diseases of the mouth, jawbones, and related structures. The application of basic scientific knowledge is emphasized in order to provide a clearer and more practical understanding. One two-hour seminar per week.

CT 331

.

Functional

anatomy

of the

head and neck.

Professor

Moss

A

concise review of the functional interrelationships and their dynamic significance. Pertinent clinical topics are analyzed from this viewpoint. One two-hour session per week.

CT 334. The

Roentgenology.

Professor

Budowsky

principles of dental x-ray technique, with emphasis poromandibular joint techniques. Ten two-hour lectures.

on

lateral,

anteroposterior, sinus, and tem-

CT 380.

Medicine. Professor Cosgriff The important aspects of internal medicine with reference

to basic fundamentals as well as recent diagnostic and therapeutic advances. Particular emphasis is placed on over-all medical problems and their implications for dentistry. One hour of lecture per week.

PROGRAM SECOND TERM: JANUARY

CT 303, 329, 334, CT 310.

1 1

IN ORAL SURGERY

9

TO MAY 23, 1962

and 380 are continued from the

Pediatrics related to dentistry.

first

term.

Williams and associates

Dr.

A

synopsis of pediatrics which emphasizes points of special interest to orthodontists. Considerable time is devoted to the basic concepts and practical aspects of the psychological care of children. Two hours of lecture and one of demonstration per week.

CT 340.

and psychosomatic medicine, and Dalmau

Psychiatry

dentistry.

Dr.

interrelationship with

their

Basic concepts of psychodynamics, psychopathology, and psychosomatic medicine presented with showing their synthesis with dentistry. Eleven two-hour lectures.

clinical material

CT 378.

Therapeutics. Professor Kutscher Drugs and their clinical application. Eleven two-hour

PROGRAM

IN

lectures.

ORAL SURGERY

A two-year program

which includes

clinical practice in the

removal of teeth and

associated surgery; training in local and general anesthesia; the diagnosis and surgical treatment of diseases; tissues;

malformation and injuries of the jaws and their related laboratory, and seminar instruction in anatomy,

basic-science lectures,

pathology, and other pertinent

fields.

classes for the first year: begin September 14, 1961, and end September

5,

1962.

classes for the second year: begin September 13, 1962, and end September

4,

1963.

FIRST

YEAR

first term: September 14, 1961, to January 10, 1962

CT 300.

Biological principles of dentistry.

Professor Di Salvo

and

staff

This course integrates the various basic sciences and correlates them with the clinical practice of dengeneral tistry. It is predicated on the assumption that dentists, regardless of specialty, must acquire a knowledge of the body as a whole and a thorough and comprehensive understanding of the oral cavity and its contents. Three hours per week.

CT311.

Clinical

oral

surgery

practice.

Professors

Friedrich,

Nathan,

Bundrant,

Rothenberg, and

staff Discussions, demonstrations, and supervised clinical practice in the application of forceps and elevators for the extraction of teeth, and its associated surgery; the preparation of the mouth for dentures. Clinical practice in the use of general anesthesia for oral surgery. Six three-hour sessions per week.

CT 31 2.

Theory and practice

in

general anesthesia.

Professor Fierstein

Lectures, seminars, and training in general anesthesia for oral surgery.

One

three-hour seminar per

week.

CT 329.

A

Diagnosis.

Professor Zegarelli

comprehensive description and discussion of the diseases of the mouth, jawbones, and related structures. The application of basic scientific knowledge is emphasized in order to provide a clearer and more practical understanding. One two-hour seminar per week.

PROGRAM

10 CT 331

IN ORAL SURGERY

Functional

.

anatomy

of the

head and neck.

Professor

Moss

A

concise review of the functional interrelationships and their dynamic significance. Pertinent clinical topics are analyzed from this viewpoint. One two-hour session per week.

Roihenberg, and

rant,

Professors Friedrich, Nathan, Bund-

Theory and practice of oral surgery.

CT 333.

staff

Diagnosis for surgical treatment of diseases, malformation, and injuries of the jaws and their related tissues; fractures of the facial bones; cysts; salivary glands; neoplasms; infections; and the removal of impacted teeth. Two one-hour lectures, demonstrations, or clinical conferences per week.

CT 334.

Roentgenology.

Professor

Budowsky

The

principles of dental x-ray technique, with emphasis poromandibular joint techniques. Ten two-hour lectures.

on

lateral, anteroposterior, sinus,

and tem-

CT 380.

Medicine. Professor Cosgriff The important aspects of internal medicine with reference to basic fundamentals as well as recent diagnostic and therapeutic advances. Particular emphasis is placed on over-all medical problems and their implications for dentistry. One hour of lecture per week.

SECOND TERM: JANUARY

CT 311, 312, 329, 333, 334, CT 340.

Dr.

and psychosomatic medicine, and Dalmau

showing

psychopathology,

their synthesis with dentistry.

Therapeutics.

Drugs and

is

first

term.

their interrelationship with

and psychosomatic medicine presented with Eleven two-hour lectures.

Professor Kutscher

their clinical application. Eleven

THIRD TERM:

311

23, 1962

and 380 are continued from the

Basic concepts of psychodynamics, clinical material

CT

TO MAY

Psychiatry

dentistry.

CT 378.

1 1

two-hour lectures.

MAY 24 TO SEPTEMBER

5,

1962

continued from the second term and meets for

five

mornings and

five

afternoons per week.

SECOND YEAR FIRST TERM:

CT 311

SEPTEMBER

14, 1961,

and 333 are continued from the

TO JANUARY

first

year,

1962

10,

CT 311

meeting for

five clinical

three-hour sessions per week.

CT 347.

Maxillofacial surgery.

Attendance

Professor

at maxillofacial operations

Rankow

which are related to surgical anatomy and technique. One

four-hour session every other week.

SECOND TERM: JANUARY

1 1

TO MAY

23, 1962

CT 311 ing

and 347 are continued from the first term, and four afternoon sessions per week.

CT 313.

Surgical

anatomy

of the oral cavity, head,

CT 311

and

neck.

meeting for four morn-

Professor

Rankow

Demonstrations, lectures, and dissections. The surgical procedures performed in maxillofacial and head and neck surgery are observed and correlated. One lecture and laboratory session per week.

PROGRAM THIRD TERM:

CT

311

is

IN ORTHODONTICS

11

MAY 23, TO SEPTEMBER 5, 1962

continued from the second term and meets for

five

mornings and

five

afternoons per week.

PROGRAM

IN

A sixteen months'

ORTHODONTICS

program designed to prepare dentists for specialized and seminar instruction in the basic growth and development, in the theory and practice of orthodontics, full-time

practice in orthodontics. Included are lectures sciences, in

and

in other fields related to clinical orthodontics.

Diagnosis will be based on cephalometrics and other analytical orthodontic procedures.

The

A treatment will be planned for each case.

instruction will include laboratory procedures

and the theory and philosophy

of treatment with various appliances: removable, labio-lingual, twin-wire, extraoral forces, direction of

and edgewise. Satisfactory completion of

members of the orthodontic

staff is

clinical training

under the

required.

Classes begin September 14, 1961, and end January 9, 1963.

FIRST TERM:

SEPTEMBER

14, 1961,

TO JANUARY

10,

1962

Professor Di Solvo and staff Biological principles of dentistry. This course integrates the various basic sciences and correlates them with the clinical practice of dentistry. It is predicated on the assumption that dentists, regardless of specialty, must acquire a general knowledge of the body as a whole and a thorough and comprehensive understanding of the oral cavity and its contents. Three hours per week.

CT 300.

CT 306.

Orthodontic technique.

Professor Di Salvo

and

staff

Intensive technical instruction in the assembling and manipulation on typodonts of removable, labiolingual, edgewise, extraoral forces, and twin-wire appliances, retainers, and bite plates. Five three-hour sessions per week.

CT 31 9.

Scientific

methods.

investigation dealing with a subject of his choice and approved by the director of the division concerned. The study may encompass a clinical, technical, or biological problem and may be either original or a verification of work previously done. The results of the investigation must be presented in the form of a thesis which should be completed one month before the end of the final term.

The student conducts an

CT 327.

Dental anthropology and evolution.

Professor

Oppenheimer

Seminars on growth and development of bone are included. One hour of lecture per week.

CT 329.

Diagnosis.

Professor Zegarelli

A

comprehensive description and discussion of the diseases of the mouth, jawbones, and related structures. The application of basic scientific knowledge is emphasized in order to provide a clearer and more practical understanding. One two-hour seminar per week.

CT 331

.

Functional

anatomy

of the

head and neck.

Professor

Moss

A

concise review of the functional interrelationships and their dynamic significance. Pertinent clinical topics are analyzed from this viewpoint. One two-hour session per week.

CT 334. The

Roentgenology.

Professor

Budowsky

principles of dental x-ray technique, with emphasis poromandibular joint techniques. Ten two-hour lectures.

on

lateral,

anteroposterior, sinus, and tem-

PROGRAM

12

CT 376.

IN ORTHODONTICS

Dental materials.

Professor Ayers

Lectures and laboratory on the physical and chemical properties of the metals and other materials used in orthodontics with clinical applications. Six one-hour lectures.

CT 380.

Medicine. Professor Cosgriff The important aspects of internal medicine with reference

to basic fundamentals as well as recent diagnostic and therapeutic advances. Particular emphasis is placed on over-all medical problems and One hour of lecture per week.

their implications for dentistry.

SECOND TERM: JANUARY

CT 319, 327, 329, 334, CT 307.

1 1

TO MAY 23, 1962

and 380 are continued from the

Clinical orthodontic practice.

first

Professor Di Salvo

term.

and

staff

Supervised clinical practice in the use of removable, labio-lingual, edgewise, extraoral forces, and twin-wire appliances, retainers and bite plates. Five three-hour sessions per week.

CT 310.

Pediatrics related to dentistry.

Dr.

Williams and associates

A

synopsis of pediatrics which emphasizes points of special interest to orthodontists. Considerable time is devoted to the basic concepts and practical aspects of the psychological care of children. Two hours of lecture and one of demonstration per week.

CT 31

Theory and practice of orthodontics.

5.

Professor Di Salvo

Lectures, discussions, and demonstrations, in which theory practice. Five one-hour lectures per week.

CT 340.

is

and psychosomatic medicine, and Dalmau

Psychiatry

dentistry.

Dr.

and

staff

correlated with clinical observation and

their

interrelationship with

Basic concepts of psychodynamics, psychopathology, and psychosomatic medicine presented with showing their synthesis with dentistry. Eleven two-hour lectures.

clinical material

CT 343A.

Public health related to orthodontics.

Dr.

Huettner

Six one-hour lectures.

CT 343B.

Oral surgery related to orthodontics.

Professors Rothenberg

and Rankow

Practical considerations of unerupted teeth, extreme prognathism, intermaxillary wiring, and cleftpalate cases. Six one-hour lectures.

CT 370.

Speech pathology and therapy. Mrs. Kastein Normal and abnormal language and speech development in children; speech and patients with oral impairments. Four one-hour lectures.

voice problems in

CT 378.

Therapeutics. Professor Kutscher Drugs and their clinical application. Eleven two-hour

third term:

CT 307

may 24,

1962, to

lectures.

January

9,

1963

and 319 are continued from the second term.

CT 31

6. Orthodontic seminar. Professor Di Salvo and staff Seminars on diagnosis and treatment planning. Twelve one-hour seminars.

CT 361. Maxillofacial follow-up Two two-hour sessions. CT 377.

clinic.

The cleft-palate patient.

The various problems

Drs.

Professor

Rankow

Luban,

Kaplan,

in the treatment of the cleft-palate patient with related specialties is emphasized. Four two-hour lectures.

Bruno,

and Cole

by the orthodontist. Coordination

PROGRAM

PROGRAM

and courses for

full-

and half-time,

clinical practice in

consists of courses in applied basic

pedodontics and other closely related

phases of dentistry, including dentistry for pediatric patients. There

ment

13

IN PEDODONTICS

The curriculum, both sciences

IN PEDODONTICS

is

also assign-

and child development. In

to special courses in pediatrics, applied nutrition,

pedodontic conference and clinical practice, principles of the various courses are related to the requirements for intelligent and complete dental care for children.

full-time: classes begin September 14, 1961, and end half-time: classes for the

first

May

22, 1963. Students follow the

FULL-TIME:

on September

same curriculum

as given

13, 1962,

May

and end

below for full-time

by arrangement.

ONE YEAR

FIRST TERM:

CT 300.

1962.

year begin on September 14, 1961, and end

23, 1962. Classes for the second year begin students; hours are

May 23,

SEPTEMBER

TO JANUARY

14, 1961,

Biological principles of dentistry.

10,

1962

and

Professor Di Salvo

staff

This course integrates the various basic sciences and correlates them with the clinical practice of dentistry. It is predicated on the assumption that dentists, regardless of specialty, must acquire a general knowledge of the body as a whole and a thorough and comprehensive understanding of the oral cavity and its contents. Three hours per -week.

CT 31

2.

Theory and practice

in

general anesthesia.

Professor Fierstein

Lectures, seminars, and training in general anesthesia for oral surgery.

One

three-hour seminar per

week.

CT 327.

Dental anthropology and evolution.

Professor

Oppenheimer

Seminars on growth and development of bone are included. One hour of lecture per week.

CT 329.

Professor Zegarelli

Diagnosis.

A

comprehensive description and discussion of the diseases of the mouth, jawbones, and related structures. The application of basic scientific knowledge is emphasized in order to provide a clearer and more practical understanding. One two-hour seminar per week.

CT331.

Functional

anatomy

of the

head and neck.

Professor

Moss

A

concise review of the functional interrelationships and their dynamic significance. Pertinent clinical topics are analyzed from this viewpoint. One two-hour sessions per week.

CT 334.

Roentgenology.

Professor

Budowsky

The

principles of dental x-ray technique, with emphasis poromandibular joint techniques. Ten two-hour lectures.

CT 351

.

Clinical practice in pedodontics.

on

lateral, anteroposterior, sinus,

Professor Rosenstein

and

and tem-

staff

Supervised clinical practice in pedodontics and related fields. Management of juvenile patients, particularly the very young, and dental care for children referred from outpatient hospital clinics. In addition to the exercise of broad caries-control measures, emphasis is placed on evaluation of cariogenic factors in rampant cases, and measures for improvement. Four sessions per week.

CT 353.

Theory and practice of pedodontics.

Lectures and conferences on oral disease in children.

Two

Professor Rosenstein

factors relating to treatment planning and measures for control of one-hour lectures or conferences per week. all

PROGRAM

14 CT 365.

IN PEDODONTICS

Orthodontics

Nahoum,

Hirschfeld,

related

and

and

pedodontics

to

periodontology.

Professors

Dr. Lasoff

A

survey of orthodontics, classification, diagnosis, growth and development, and treatment planning. Seminars and laboratory sessions. One three-hour session every other week.

handicapped children at outside

Clinical practice in dentistry for severely

CT 372B.

Professor Rosenstein

affiliated hospitals.

and

Dr.

Adelson

Complete dental care for severely handicapped inpatients; and for severely handicapped outpatients requiring dental treatment under general anesthesia. One half-day session every other week.

CT 377.

The cleft-palate patient.

Drs.

Luban, Kaplan, Bruno, and Cole

The various problems

in the treatment of the cleft-palate patient with related specialties is emphasized. Four one-hour lectures.

by the orthodontist. Coordination

CT 380.

Professor Cosgriff Medicine. The important aspects of internal medicine with reference to basic fundamentals as well as recent diagnostic and therapeutic advances. Particular emphasis is placed on over-all medical problems and their implications for dentistry. One hour of lecture per week.

G.S. Psychology 57.

Autumn

Developmental psychology,

term: Tuesday, 6:35-8:15 p.m.

Dr.

I.

Room

Fromme

to be announced.

Prerequisite: G.S. Psychology Al or 1, or the equivalent. of growth during the first six years of life as it is related to personality development. The possible connections between early vegetative activities and subsequent emotional characteristics. The interaction of child and parent, sibling rivalry, as well as the character of intellectual, sexual, and social development. Experimental findings and practical suggestions for child care are both con-

The nature

sidered.

SECOND TERM: JANUARY

CT 312, CT 31 0.

1 1

TO MAY

23, 1962

327, 334, 351, 353, 365, 372B, and 380 are continued from the Pediatrics related to dentistry.

Dr.

first

term.

Williams and associates

A

synopsis of pediatrics which emphasizes points of special interest to orthodontists. Considerable time is devoted to the basic concepts and practical aspects of tiie psychological care of children. Two hours of lecture and one of demonstration per week.

CT 319.

Scientific

methods.

investigation dealing with a subject of his choice and approved by the director of the division concerned. The study may encompass a clinical, technical, or biological problem related to pedodontics and may be either original or a verification of work previously done. The results of the investigation must be presented in the form of a thesis which should be completed one month before the end of the final term.

The student conducts an

CT 343A.

Public health related to orthodontics.

Dr.

Huettner

Six one-hour lectures.

CT 353.

Theory and practice of pedodontics.

Professor Rosenstein

Conferences on factors relating to prevention of disease and disorders of the teeth and surrounding structures in children; includes reports on pertinent literature. The purpose is to demonstrate the practicability of concepts of preventive dentistry and the inclusion of sound measures for prevention of oral disease and disorders in pedodontic service. Two one-hour lectures or conferences per week.

Speech pathology and therapy. Mrs. Kastein Normal and abnormal language and speech development in children; speech and

CT 370.

patients with oral impairments.

Four one-hour

lectures.

CT 378.

Therapeutics. Professor Kutscher Drugs and their clinical application. Eleven two-hour

lectures.

voice problems in

PROGRAM IN PEDODONTICS: CEREBRAL PALSY Developmental psychology,

G.S. Psychology 58.

Dr.

II.

15

Fromme

Spring term: Tuesday, 6:35-8:15 Prerequisite: G.S. Psychology Al or 1, or the equivalent. The important phases of development from the age of six through adolescence to maturity. Efforts are made to show the connections between the various stages of personality growth within a framework of influential cultural factors. Special attention is paid to the problems of each age as well as the factors which go into the achievement of adequate adjustment.

T.C. Nutrition 101.

Spring term Monday, 5 30-7 :

:

:

1 0.

40 1 Dodge Hall, Teachers College.

candidates in pedodontics. Discussion of the food needs of persons of different ages with special regard to newer developments of the science of nutrition and their effects on health and efficiency. Planned to meet needs of professional groups such as nurses, health educators, science teachers, child development specialists, and

Required of

all certificate

others.

Students who are unable to take the course during the academic year may enroll for Session (101S). There will be an additional fee for the summer-session course.

PROGRAM

it

in the

Summer

IN PEDODONTICS:

CEREBRAL PALSY CLINICAL FELLOWSHIP IN DENTISTRY Two cil

fellowships, established with the cooperation of the Dental

Guidance Coun-

for Cerebral Palsy, are sponsored by the United Cerebral Palsy Associations, In-

corporated, to train dentists in special medico-dental problems in the treatment of children with cerebral palsy. The Cerebral Palsy Dental Fellowship is a two-year,

program and includes applied basic-science courses and medical and den-

full-time

courses in various aspects of pedodontics and cerebral palsy. During the second year there is emphasis on complete inpatient and outpatient cerebral palsy dental tal

service. Participation in a research study related to dentistry in cerebral palsy

required during the second year.

Each fellowship

carries

is

an annual stipend.

classes for the first year: begin September 14, 1961, and end

May

23, 1962.

classes for the second year: begin September 13, 1962, and end

May

22, 1963.

FIRST

YEAR

FIRST TERM: SEPTEMBER 14, 1961, TO JANUARY 10, 1962

CT 300.

Biological principles of dentistry.

Professor Di Salvo

and

staff

This course integrates the various basic sciences and correlates them with the clinical practice of dentistry. It is predicated on the assumption that dentists, regardless of specialty, must acquire a general knowledge of the body as a whole and a thorough and comprehensive understanding of the oral cavity and its contents. Three hours per week.

CT 31 2.

Theory and practice

in

general anesthesia.

Professor Fierstein

Lectures, seminars, and training in general anesthesia for oral surgery.

One

three-hour seminar per

week.

CT 31 2A.

Professor Fierstein minor oral surgery for children, with general anesthesia. One

Oral surgery and general anesthesia.

Demonstrations and

clinical practice in

three-hour clinic session per week.

CT 329.

A

Diagnosis.

Professor Zegarelli

comprehensive description and discussion of the diseases of the mouth, jawbones, and related

PROGRAM

16

IN PEDODONTICS: CEREBRAL PALSY

structures. The application of basic scientific knowledge is emphasized and more practical understanding. One two-hour seminar per week.

CT 331

Functional

.

anatomy

of the

head and neck.

in order to provide

Professor

a clearer

Moss

A

concise review of the functional interrelationships and their dynamic significance. Pertinent clinical topics are analyzed from this viewpoint. One two-hour session per week.

Roentgenology.

CT 334.

Professor

Budowsky

principles of dental x-ray technique, with emphasis poromandibular joint techniques. Ten two-hour lectures.

The

CT 351

Clinical practice in periodontics.

.

on

lateral,

anteroposterior, sinus,

Professor Rosenstein

and

and tem-

staff

Supervised clinical practice in pedodontics and related fields. Management of juvenile patients, particularly the very young, and dental care for children referred from outpatient hospital clinics. In addition to the exercise of broad caries-control measures, emphasis is placed on evaluation of cariogenic factors in rampant cases, and measures for improvement. Three sessions per week.

Theory and practice of pedodontics.

CT 353.

Lectures and conferences on oral disease in children.

Two

Professor Rosenstein

factors relating to treatment planning and measures for control of one-hour lectures or conferences per week. all

CT 365. Orthodontics related to pedodontics and periodontology. houm, Hirschfeld, and Dr. Lasoff

Na-

Professors

A survey of orthodontics, classification, diagnosis, growth and development, and treatment planning. Seminars and laboratory sessions. One three-hour session every other week. CT 371 A.

Medico-dental aspects of cerebral palsy.

Dr. Singer

and Mrs. Hendin

Assignment to the pediatric cerebral palsy clinic in order to develop an understanding of the neuromuscular and psychological problems in cerebral palsy and to train the Fellows to work with children with cerebral palsy.

One

three-hour clinic session per week.

CT 371

Dr. Singer Pediatric cerebral palsy conference. B. Weekly conferences concerning the patients seen in the pediatric cerebral palsy discipline approach to evaluation and treatment is stressed. One hour per week.

Anatomy G4023x. Structure and penter and Noback

function of the nervous system.

clinic.

The

multi-

Professors Car-

histology, development, and architectonics of the nervous system of man. Lectures, demonstrations, conferences, and laboratory work. One three-hour session per week.

The anatomy,

SECOND TERM: JANUARY

CT

1 1

TO MAY 23, 1962

312, 312A, 329, 334, 351, 353, 365, 371 A and

first

371B

are continued

from the

term.

CT 310.

Pediatrics related to dentistry.

Dr.

Williams and associates

A

synopsis of pediatrics. Certain peculiarities of growing children of significance in orthodontics. basic concepts and practical aspects of the psychological care of children. Two hours of lecture one of demonstration per week.

CT 353.

Theory and practice of pedodontics.

The and

Professor Rosenstein

Conferences on factors relating to prevention of disease and disorders of the teeth and surrounding structures in children; includes reports on pertinent literature. The purpose is to demonstrate the practicability of concepts of preventive dentistry and the inclusion of sound measures for prevention of oral disease and disorders in pedodontic service. Two one-hour lectures or conferences per week.

CT 370.

Speech pathology and therapy.

Mrs. Kastein

Language and speech development in children, and speech pathology and therapy oral impairment. Four one-hour lectures.

in the patient with

PROGRAM CT 372A.

IN PEDODONTICS: CEREBRAL PALSY

with cerebral palsy.

Clinical practice in dentistry for children

Rosenstein

and

Dr.

17

Professor

Snyder clinic for orientation and clinical practice in the procedures for cerebral palsy and accompanying conditions. One four-hour clinic

Assignment to the cerebral palsy

management of children with session per week.

CT 378.

Therapeutics.

Drugs and

Professor Kutscher

their clinical application.

Eleven two-hour lectures.

Anatomy G4024y. Structure and penter and Noback Continuation of

Neurology

1

function of the nervous system.

Professors Car-

Anatomy G4023x.

06.

Clinical neurology.

Dr.

Gallinek

Etiology, symptomatology, and treatment in diseases of the brain, spinal cord, and peripheral nerves. One two-hour lecture per week.

Psychiatry

1

02.

Elementary psychiatry.

Dr.

O'Connor

Etiology and symptomatology of the major and minor psychoses, including the psychoneuroses and their treatment. Lectures with clinical demonstrations and field trips. One two-hour lecture per week.

SECOND YEAR FIRST TERM: SEPTEMBER 14, 1961, TO JANUARY 10, 1962

CT 312 A, 371 A, CT 31 9.

and 371 B are continued from the

Scientific

first

year.

methods

investigation dealing with a subject of his choice and approved by the director of the division concerned. The study may encompass a clinical, technical, or biological problem related to dentistry in cerebral palsy, and may be either original or a verification of work previously done. The results of the investigation must be presented in the form of a thesis which should be completed one month before the end of the final term.

The student conducts an

CT 334A.

Roentgenology.

Professor

Budowsky and Mr. Linder

Clinical practice in roentgenological procedures for patients with cerebral palsy. session per week.

Theory and practice of periodontology. One hour of lecture per week.

CT 339.

CT 372A.

One

three-hour clinic

Professor Beube

Clinical practice in dentistry for patients

with cerebral palsy.

Professor

and Drs. Green, King, and Schreiber Assignment to the cerebral palsy clinic for complete dental care of outpatients with cerebral palsy and other accompanying conditions. Three clinic sessions per week. Rosenstein,

CT 372B.

Clinical practice in dentistry for severely

affiliated hospitals.

Professor Rosenstein

and

Dr.

handicapped children at outside Adelson

Complete dental care for severely handicapped inpatients; and for severely handicapped outpatients requiring dental treatment under general anesthesia. Two half-day sessions per week and a third session every other week.

SECOND TERM: JANUARY

1 1

TO MAY 23, 1962

319, 334A, 339, 37 IB, 372 A, and 372 B are continued from the 372 B meeting for three half-day sessions per week.

CT

first

term,

CT

PROGRAM

18

PROGRAM A

IN PERIODONTOLOGY

IN

FULL-TIME

PERIODONTOLOGY—FULL-TIME

two-year program of courses in the theory and practice of periodontology to

prepare the dentist for specialized service. Practical diagnosis, treatment planning,





and periodontia treatment conservative and surgical are combined with related science and theory. Training in the scientific approach to a problem is also offered. Full University credit

is

given for

all

courses that the student completes even

though the student does not continue for the second year of advanced study. classes for the first year: begin September 14, 1961, and end

May

23, 1962.

classes for the second year: begin September 13, 1962, and end

May

22, 1963.

FIRST

YEAR

FIRST TERM:

CT 300.

SEPTEMBER

14, 1961,

Biological principles of dentistry.

TO JANUARY

10,

Professor Di Salvo

1962

and

staff

This course integrates the various basic sciences and correlates them with the clinical practice of dentistry. It is predicated on the assumption that dentists, regardless of specialty, must acquire a general knowledge of the body as a whole and a thorough and comprehensive understanding of the oral cavity and its contents. Three hours per week.

CT 305.

Clinical practice in periodontology.

Professor

Beube

Demonstrations and practice in periodontal diagnosis including soft-tissue lesions of the mouth, treatment planning, and conservative and surgical periodontal treatment. Five sessions per week, Monday through Friday.

CT 329.

Diagnosis.

Professor Zegarelli

A

comprehensive description and discussion of the diseases of the mouth, jawbones, and related structures. The application of basic scientific knowledge is emphasized in order to provide a clearer and more practical understanding. One two-hour seminar per week.

CT 331

.

Functional

anatomy

of the

head and neck.

Professor

Moss

A

concise review of the functional interrelationships and their dynamic significance. Pertinent clinical topics are analyzed from this viewpoint. One two-hour session per week.

CT 334.

Roentgenology.

Professor

Budowsky

The

principles of dental x-ray technique, with emphasis poromandibular joint techniques. Ten two-hour lectures.

CT 339. One hour

CT 341

.

Theory and practice of periodontology.

on

lateral, anteroposterior, sinus,

and tem-

Professor Beube

of lecture per week.

Review of the

literature in periodontology.

Professor Beube

One two-hour seminar per week.

CT 365. Orthodontics related to pedodontics and periodontology. houm, Hirschfeld, and Dr. LasofT

Professors Na-

A

survey of orthodontics, classification, diagnosis, growth and development, and treatment planning. Seminars and laboratory sessions. One three-hour session every other week.

CT 380.

Medicine. Professor Cosgriff The important aspects of internal medicine with reference

to basic fundamentals as well as recent diagnostic and therapeutic advances. Particular emphasis is placed on over-all medical problems and their implications for dentistry. One hour of lecture per week.

PROGRAM SECOND TERM: JANUARY

CT 305, CT381.

1 1

IN PERIODONTOLOGY

TO MAY

—HALF-TIME

19

23, 1962

329, 339, 341, 365, and 380 are continued from the

first

term.

Professor Gottsegen

Periodontal surgical conference.

Seminars on special periodontal surgical problems. One and one-half hour seminar per week for eleven weeks.

Periodontal histology and histopathology. Dr. Abzug Microscopic sections of the periodontal structures in health and disease discussed and correlated to periodontal clinical findings. One-hour lecture per week for eleven weeks.

CT 383.

SECOND YEAR FIRST TERM: SEPTEMBER 14, 1961, TO JANUARY 10, 1962

CT

305 and 341 are continued from the

first

year.

CT. 354. Treatment planning in periodontology. One hour of seminar per week.

CT 373.

Temporomandibular

One one-and-one-half-hour

CT 382.

lecture

joint and occlusion. and seminar per week.

Oral soft-tissue lesions.

Study of selected oral group research projects

Professor Gottsegen

Professor Kutscher

soft-tissue lesions during the course of is

included.

One hour

SECOND TERM: JANUARY

CT

Professor Beube

1 1

experiment therapy. Participation in of clinical demonstration, alternate weeks.

TO MAY 23, 1962

305, 341, 354, 373, and 382 are continued from the

CT 340.

and psychosomatic medicine, and Dalmau

Psychiatry

dentistry.

Dr.

first

term.

their interrelationship with

Basic concepts of psychodynamics, psychopathology, and psychosomatic medicine presented with showing their synthesis with dentistry. Eleven two-hour lectures.

clinical material

CT 378.

Professor Kutscher Therapeutics. Drugs and their clinical application. Eleven two-hour

CT 384.

Restorative

dentistry

related

to

lectures.

periodontics.

Professors

Herlands and

Lucca Restorative dentistry significant to periodontal problems. One-hour lecture per

PROGRAM

IN

week for eleven weeks.

PERIODONTOLOGY—HALF-TIME

A four-year program which contains the same material as the two-year, full-time program and requires attendance two and one-half days a week. Full University credit is given for courses completed in any one or more years even though the student does not continue for the four-year period.

classes for the first year: begin September 14, 1961, and end

May

classes for the second, third, and fourth years: to be announced.

23, 1962.

PROGRAM

20

FIRST

YEAR

SEPTEMBER

FIRST TERM:

CT 300.

HALF-TIME

IN PERIODONTOLOGY

14, 1961,

Biological principles of dentistry.

TO JANUARY

10,

Professor Di Salvo

1962

and

staff

This course integrates the various basic sciences and correlates them with the clinical practice of dentistry. It is predicated on the assumption that dentists, regardless of specialty, must acquire a general knowledge of the body as a whole and a thorough and comprehensive understanding of the oral cavity and its contents. Three hours per -week.

Professor Beube Clinical practice in periodontology. Demonstrations and practice in periodontal diagnosis including soft-tissue lesions of the mouth, treatment planning, and conservative and surgical periodontal treatment. Three morning sessions per week.

CT 305.

CT 331

Functional

.

anatomy

head and neck.

of the

Professor

Moss

A

concise review of the functional interrelationships and their dynamic significance. Pertinent clinical topics are analyzed from this viewpoint. One two-hour session per week.

Roentgenology.

CT 334.

Professor

Budowsky

principles of dental x-ray technique, with emphasis poromandibular joint techniques. Ten two-hour lectures.

The

Theory and practice of periodontology.

CT 339. One hour

CT 341

.

on

lateral, anteroposterior, sinus,

Professor

and tem-

Beube

of lecture per week.

Review of the

literature in periodontology.

Professor Beube

One two-hour seminar per week.

CT 373. One

Temporomandibular

joint

and

occlusion.

Professor Gottsegen

one-and-one-half -hour lecture and seminar per week.

CT 380.

Medicine. Professor Cosgriff The important aspects of internal medicine with reference

to basic fundamentals as well as recent diagnostic and therapeutic advances. Particular emphasis is placed on over-all medical problems and their implications for dentistry. One hour of lecture per week.

SECOND TERM: JANUARY

CT 305,

1 1

TO MAY 23, 1962

334, 339, 341, 373, and 380 are continued from the

first

term.

Professor Gottsegen Periodontal surgical conference. Seminars on special periodontal surgical problems. One and one-half hour seminar per week for

CT381.

eleven weeks.

SECOND YEAR FIRST TERM:

CT

305

is

SEPTEMBER

continued from the

14, 1961,

first

TO JANUARY

10,

1962

year and meets for two three-hour afternoon

sessions per week.

CT 329.

Diagnosis.

Professor Zegarelli

A

comprehensive description and discussion of the diseases of the mouth, jawbones, and related structures. The application of basic scientific knowledge is emphasized in order to provide a clearer and more practical understanding. One two-hour seminar per week.

CT 365. Orthodontics related to pedodontics and periodontology. houm, Hirschfeld, and Dr. Lasoff

A

Professors

Na-

survey of orthodontics, classification, diagnosis, growth and development, and treatment planning. Seminars and laboratory sessions. One three-hour session every other week.

PROGRAM SECOND TERM: JANUARY

CT 305, CT 383.

1 1

IN PERIODONTOLOGY

21

TO MAY 23, 1962

329, and 365 are continued from the

first

term.

and histopathology.

Periodontal histology

HALF-TIME

Dr.

Abzug

Microscopic sections of the periodontal structures in health and disease discussed and correlated to periodontal clinical findings. One-hour lecture per week for eleven weeks.

THIRD YEAR

SEPTEMBER

FIRST TERM:

14, 1961,

TO JANUARY

10,

1962

CT 305 is continued from the second year. CT 354.

Treatment planning One two-hour seminar per week.

CT 382.

in

periodontology.

Oral soft-tissue lesions.

Study of selected oral group research projects

CT 340.

Professor Kutscher

soft-tissue lesions during the course of experimental therapy. Participation in is

included.

One hour

SECOND TERM: JANUARY

CT 305,

Professor Beube

1 1

of clinical demonstration, alternate weeks.

TO MAY

23, 1962

354, and 382 are continued from the

first

term.

and psychosomatic medicine, and Dalmau

Psychiatry

dentistry.

Dr.

their interrelationship with

Basic concepts of psychodynamics, psychopathology, and psychosomatic medicine presented with showing their synthesis with dentistry. Eleven two-hour lectures.

clinical material

CT 378.

Professor Kutscher Therapeutics. Drugs and their clinical application. Eleven two-hour

lectures.

FOURTH YEAR FIRST TERM: SEPTEMBER 14, 1961, TO JANUARY 10, 1962

CT 305 is continued from the third year. CT 341

.

Review of the

literature in periodontology.

Professor Beube

One two-hour seminar per week.

SECOND TERM: JANUARY

CT 305 CT 384.

1 1

TO MAY 23, 1962

and 341 are continued from the Restorative

dentistry

related

first

to

term.

periodontics.

Professors

Herlands and

Lucca Restorative dentistry significant to periodontal problems. One-hour lecture per week for eleven weeks.

Section 4

Training in a Basic Medical Science In recognition of the need for comprehensive training in the basic medical sciences and to qualify graduates in dentistry as teachers and investigators, fellowships are offered for study and research in anatomy, biochemistry, microbiology, pathology, pharmacology, and physiology. Fellows are normally enrolled under the Graduate Faculties of the University as prospective candidates for the degree of Doctor of

Philosophy.

Appointments are made on a yearly (twelve-month)

basis,

with opportunity for

renewal or extension at the discretion of the chairman of the department in which the student

is

enrolled.

The

specific objectives of the

program are

to furnish

more

complete preparation for careers in dental education and to offer training in investigation so that research in important unsolved problems indigenous to dental science will

be extended.

The formal

instruction

is

elected

from graduate courses offered under the Gradu-

Dental and Oral Surgery, the College of Physicians and Surgeons, and the School of Public Health and Administrative Medicine. Each fellow must formulate and carry out, under supervision, an original laboratory ate Faculties, the School of

During the period of appointment, he is expected to remain in residence and devote his entire time to study and research. In order to maintain contact with clinical dentistry, he may attend clinics in the School of Dental and Oral

investigation.

Surgery and will be given an opportunity to participate in undergraduate teaching.

FELLOWSHIP APPLICATION

To

apply for a dental fellowship, the applicant should obtain

—from

the Post-

graduate Admissions Office, School of Dental and Oral Surgery, 630 West 168th Street,

New York

32,

N.Y.

—an

returned to the same address.

He

application

form which should be

filled

out and

should also arrange for each college or university

he has attended to send two official transcripts of his record to the Postgraduate Admissions Office. A personal interview with the applicant is also required. Applications may be submitted at any time. Appointments are made as vacancies occur. ADMISSION TO THE GRADUATE FACULTIES

Upon

acceptance, the applicant must apply for admission as a regular graduate

student under the Graduate Faculties of Columbia University.

The admission payment of

cedure, and the procedure and dates for registration, including

profees,

are given in the bulletin of the Graduate Faculties, a copy of which may be secured by writing to the Office of University Admissions, 322 University Hall, Columbia University, New York 27, N.Y.

Admission, Registration, and Fees To be admitted

any course or program, an applicant must have a state license and he must fulfill the specific admission requirements of the

to

to practice dentistry

section in

which he wishes to

enroll (see below).

An

applicant

who

is

not a citizen

of the United States must comply with certain special requirements of the

York

State

Department of Education and should write

to the Postgraduate

New

Admis-

sions Office for further details.

SECTION When

AND

1

2

COURSES

to apply: as early as possible, certainly

no

later

than eight weeks before the

course begins. Applications are acted upon as soon as they are received and

enrollment in

courses

all

is

limited.

PD 419 and PD 422 (Section 2): membership American Association of Orthodontists or in a

Additional admission requirement for in a sectional society of the

generally recognized organization of orthodontic specialists in a foreign country; or, certification

by the American Board of Orthodontics.

Admission procedure and payment of fees: write to the Postgraduate Admissions Office, School of Dental and Oral Surgery, 630 West 168th Street, New York 32, N.Y., for an application form, which must be filled out and returned. The completed form should be accompanied by a check or money order made payable to Columbia University for the full amount of the tuition fee as stated in the course entry. If an applicant applies for admission to more than one course, he must send a separate application form and a separate check for each one. Tuition fees are not refundable unless the applicant is not accepted by the Postgraduate Admissions Committee or unless the course

Books and instruments:

is

cancelled.

to be purchased after the course begins. Their cost, as

stated in the course entry,

is

only an estimate, since prices fluctuate and a supply

shortage might necessitate making substitutions.

on the opening date of the course, at the Office of the Reg405, second floor, College of Physicians and Surgeons, 630 West

Registration: in person, istrar,

Room

168th Street.

SECTION

3

PROGRAMS

ADMISSION

When

to apply: before

March

1,

gives preference to applicants (a)

two years of experience

1961.

who

The Postgraduate Admissions Committee

present one of the following qualifications:

in dental practice (service as a dental officer in the

24

REGISTRATION federal services



REGULATIONS

fulfills

this qualification);

(b) completion of an internship of

twelve months or more; or (c) completion of at least twelve months of university

graduate or postgraduate work in dentistry, a basic science, or an allied

field.

Admission procedure: write to the Postgraduate Admissions Office, School of Dental and Oral Surgery, 630 West 168th Street, New York 32, N.Y., for an application form, which must be filled out and returned. The completed form should be accompanied by the application fee of $15. Since the fee covers the cost of processing the application, it is not refundable and is not credited toward tuition. As requested in the form, the applicant should ask each of the colleges or unito for both preprofessional and professional studies versities he has attended send official transcripts of his record direct to the Postgraduate Admissions Committee, and he should also submit proof of current licensure in the form of a





certificate

or statement from an

Personal interview:

if

official

of the body that issued his license.

practicable, the Postgraduate Admissions

Committee may ask

an applicant to come to the Dental School for a personal interview. Acceptance fee: within two weeks after he receives notice of his acceptance, an applicant must notify the Committee that he intends to enroll and must send a check or money order for $200 made payable to Columbia University. ters for the

his tuition;

he

If

regis-

term to which he has been admitted, the fee will be credited toward if he does not register, the fee will not be refunded.

REGISTRATION

Before attending classes, students must register in person on September 13, 1961, between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m., and should report to their divisional offices in the School of Dental and Oral Surgery as follows: students in oral surgery, to the seventh floor; those in oral medicine, eighth floor;

others, ninth floor. Registra-

all

forms required for University records and paying the fees. Late registration requires the approval of the Dean of the School and the payment

tion consists of filling out

of a late fee (see below)

REGULATIONS

Each person whose

registration has

been completed

of the University during the term for which he

with the University

is

officially

is

will

be considered a student

registered unless his connection

tered in any other school or college, either of institution,

is first

registered.

privileges of the University are not available to

of registration, no student's registration student

any student

is

is

until

permitted to attend any University course for which he

after the stated period unless

he has com-

payment of

fees

is

part

complete until his fees have been paid.

registered unless he has been granted auditing privileges.

director.

regis-

Columbia University or of any other

pleted his registration. Since, under the University statutes,

No

student

same time be

without the specific authorization of the dean or director of the school

or college of the University in which he

The

No

severed by withdrawal or otherwise.

registered in any school or college of the University shall at the

No

is

student

not

officially

may

register

he obtains the written consent of the proper dean or

FEES

25

Absences: Students are held accountable for absences incurred owing to late enrollment. Any student whose religious duties conflict at any time with academic requirements should apply to his dean or director for an equitable solution.

A

student in good standing may, for reasons of weight, be Leaves of absence: granted a leave of absence by the dean or director of the division of the University in which he is registered.

Academic sity,

discipline:

The continuance of each student upon the rolls of the Univerhim of academic credits, his graduation, and the conferring

the receipt by

of any degree or the granting of any certificate are strictly subject to the disciplinary powers of the University, which

is

free to cancel his registration at any

time on any grounds which it deems proper. The disciplinary authority of the University is vested in the President and, subject to his reserved powers, in the

dean of each faculty and the director of the work of each administrative board. FEES

Tuition and the comprehensive fee are payable each term in advance and as part The student health and hospital fee is payable at September regis-

of registration.

day of

tration. If these fees are paid after the last

duced and a

late fee of

registration, they will

$6.00 will be imposed. The following

fees,

not be re-

payable in several

by statute for programs leading to the certificate of and are subject to change at any time at the discretion of the Trustees:

installments, are prescribed

training

Number of

Fee per

Installments

Installment

Total fee

2 6

$50.00

Oral surgery Orthodontics

3

50.00

Pedodontics (half-time)

4 2

25.00 50.00

$100.00 300.00 150.00 100.00 100.00

First year

2

50.00

100.00

Second year

2

75.00

Periodontology (half-time)

8

25.00

150.00 200.00

Periodontology (full-time)

4

50.00

200.00

675.00 675.00

2,700.00

COMPREHENSIVE FEE Oral medicine

Pedodontics (full-time)

50.00

Pedodontics (cerebral palsy)

TUITION Oral medicine Oral surgery

1,850.00

Orthodontics First

two

675.00

installments, each

Third installment Pedodontics ( half-time Pedodontics (full-time) Pedodontics (cerebral palsy)

1,350.00

500.00 2

337.50 675.00

4

1,350.00 1,350.00

2

675.00

1,350.00

Periodontology (half-time)

8

337.50

2,700.00

Periodontology (full-time)

4

675.00

2,700.00

First year

26

FEES

STUDENT HEALTH AND HOSPITAL FEE For

all

academic year used to pay the annual premium of the Associated HosService of New York for hospital insurance and to pay part of

pital

$50.00

full-time students, per

This fee

is

the cost of the student health service. Students

who

are already in-

sured pay $7.28.

APPLICATION FEES AND LATE FEES $15.00

Application for admission

Application for each special examination

10.00

For renewal of application for a certificate For late registration For late application for a special examination For late application, or late renewal of application, for a WITHDRAWAL AND ADJUSTMENT OF

A

student

who

1.00

6.00

5.00 5.00

certificate

FEES

decides to withdraw from the University must notify the Regis-

He will be given an honorable discharge provided he is in good academic standing and not subject to discipline. At the Registrar's discretion and according to University policy, he will also be given a proportionate rebate of the tuition that he has paid. The rebate will be reckoned from the day on which the Registrar receives the student's written notification of withdrawal. The comprehensive fee, the student health and hospital fee, application fees, late fees, and special trar in writing at once.

fees are not refundable.

ESTIMATED EXPENSES

Since the prices of books and instruments necessary for the School to figures given

make

may

fluctuate

and since

it

may

be

substitutions because of supply shortages, the

below for instruments and books are only approximate. Estimated

Tuition

and Fees

Program

Instruments

Books

Total

$1,507

$1,450

$57

Oral surgery

3,000

125

3,125

Orthodontics

2,000

2,708

Pedodontics

1,450

Pedodontics (cerebral palsy)

1,525

Periodontology

2,900

100 83 95 92

Oral medicine

$608

195

1,533

1,620

3,187

AUDITING COURSES Certificates-of-training candidates

who have

paid

full tuition for

the term are

eligible to audit

one or two courses

Those who are

interested should inquire at the School office for further details.

in

any division of the University without charge.

HOUSING

STATEMENTS OF ATTENDANCE (SECTION

A

1

AND

2

27

COURSES)

who has completed any of the Section 1 and 2 courses will, if he rebe given a short statement of attendance signed by the Registrar. Requests for these statements should be addressed to the Registrar. student

quests

it,

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE CERTIFICATE OF TRAINING To be awarded

the certificate of training, a candidate must

fulfill

the following

requirements: 1

2.

He must complete the prescribed courses. He must pass prescribed written, oral, or

practical examinations at the

end of

the period of residence. 3.

He must

affiliated

4.

attend special courses, when assigned, at hospitals or institutions with Columbia University but separate from the Medical Center.

He must

pleted

all

satisfy the

Committee on Postgraduate Instruction

that he has

com-

the specified requirements for the certificate of training.

HOUSING Booklets describing the University residence halls and application blanks for rooms may be obtained (for men) from the Men's Residence Halls Office, 125 Livingston Hall, Columbia University, New York 27, N.Y., or (for women) from the Johnson Hall Office, 411 West 116 Street, New York 27. Rates for the academic year are $250 to $475 for men and $285 to $525 for women. Optional prepaid board plans are available in the men's residence residents are required to take breakfast

halls.

and dinner there

In Johnson Hall, the

at a cost of

$400 for the

academic year. In Woodbridge Hall, at 43 1 Riverside Drive, are one-bedroom, furnished apart-

ments, which are rented for a twelve-month period to married graduate students.

The

rates range from $1,260 to $1,620 a year, including utilities. For further information and application forms write the Residence Halls Office, 125 Livingston Hall. Students who wish to live off campus should write or call at the Registry of OffCampus Accommodations, 115 Livingston Hall, Columbia University, New York 27, for an information sheet which describes the services rendered by the Registry.

Officers of Instruction Jerry

J.

Assistant Clinical Professor of Dentistry New York University, 1951; Ed.D., Yeshiva, 1959

Adelson.

A.B., Pennsylvania. 1944; D.D.S.,

Clinical Professor of Otolaryngology

Franz Altmann. M.D., Vienna, 1925

Edmund Applebaum. D.D.S.,

New York

Herbert Ayers,

Associate Professor of Dental

Anatomy

College of Dentistry, 1922

Associate Clinical Professor of Dentistry

Jr.

A.B., Columbia, 1929; D.D.S., 1931

Assistant Professor of Pharmacology

Herbert Bartelstone.

New

B.S., College of the City of

York, 1942; D.D.S., Columbia, 1945; Ph.D., 1960

Clinical Professor of Dentistry

Frank E. Beube.

L.D.S., D.D.S., Toronto, 1930

Assistant Clinical Professor of Dentistry

Sebastian A. Bruno. D.M.D., Tufts, 1948

Jack Budowsky.

Associate Clinical Professor of Dentistry

D.D.S., Columbia, 1943

Theodore M. Bundrant.

Associate Clinical Professor of Dentistry

D.D.S., Howard, 1929

A ssociate Professor of A natomy

Malcolm B Carpenter. .

A.B., Columbia, 1943; M.D.,

Stuart

W.

Long

Island, 1947

Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine

Cosgriff.

A.B., Holy Cross, 1938; M.D., Columbia, 1942

Joseph A. Cuttita.

Associate Professor of Dentistry

A.B., Fordham, 1932; M.S., 1936; D.D.S., Columbia, 1939

Kourken A. Daglian.

Assistant Clinical Professor of Dentistry

New

B.S., College of the City of

Nicholas A. Di Salvo.

Professor of Dentistry

B.S., College of the City of

Solon A. Ellison.

New

York, 1942; D.D.S., Columbia, 1945; Ph.D., 1952

Assistant Professor of Microbiology

B.S., College of the City of

Morris Fierstein.

York, 1941; D.D.S., Columbia, 1943

New

York, 1942; D.D.S., Columbia, 1946; Ph.D., 1958

Associate Clinical Professor of Dentistry

D.D.S., Columbia, 1921

Lewis Fox.

Associate Clinical Professor of Dentistry

D.D.S., Maryland, 1927

Rudolph H. Friedrich.

Professor of Dentistry

D.D.S., Northwestern, 1930

Harry A. Galton.

Clinical Professor of Dentistry

D.D.S., Columbia, 1932

OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION Robert Gottsegen.

Associate Clinical Professor of Dentistry

A.B., Michigan, 1939; D.D.S., Columbia, 1943

Robert E. Herlands.

Associate Professor of Dentistry

A.B., Columbia, 1941; D.D.S., 1944

Leonard

S. Hirschfeld.

Associate Clinical Professor of Dentistry

A.B., Columbia, 1941; D.D.S., Columbia, 1944

Ellen N. Hosiosky.

Assistant Clinical Professor of Dentistry

D.H., Guggenheim Dental Clinic, 1939; D.M.D., Basle, Switzerland, 1935; D.D.S., Columbia, 1947

Morris Kavelle. Assistant Clinical Professor of Dentistry B.S., New York University, 1929; D.D.S., Columbia, 1933

Bertram Klatskin.

Assistant Clinical Professor of Dentistry

A.B., Cornell, 1937; D.D.S., Columbia, 1941

Austin H. Kutscher. A.B.,

New York

Francis

J.

D.D.S.,

John

J.

A.B.,

Loughlin.

New York

Lucca.

New York

Assistant Professor of Dentistry

University, 1945; D.D.S., Columbia, 1946

Assistant Clinical Professor of Dentistry

University, 1939

Associate Professor of Dentistry University, 1941; D.D.S., Columbia, 1947

Irwin D. Mandel.

Associate Clinical Professor of Dentistry

B.S., College of the City of

Melvin L. Morris.

New

York, 1942; D.D.S., Columbia, 1945

Associate Clinical Professor of Dentistry

B.S., College of the City of

New

York, 1934; M.A., Columbia, 1937; D.D.S., 1941

Melvin Moss. Associate Professor of Anatomy A.B., New York University, 1942; D.D.S., Columbia, 1946;

Henry

I.

Nahoum.

Ph.D., 1954

Assistant Clinical Professor of Dentistry

A.B., Brooklyn, 1940; D.D.S., Columbia, 1943

Alvin S. Nathan.

Clinical Professor of Dentistry New York University, 1935; M.A., 1938

D.D.S., Columbia, 1926; B.S.,

Charles R. Noback.

Associate Professor of Anatomy New York University, 1938; Ph.D., Minnesota,

B.S., Cornell, 1936; M.S.,

Armand Oppenheimer. A.B., College of the City of

Robin M. Rankow.

Assistant Clinical Professor of Dentistry

New

York, 1926;

B.S.,

Columbia, 1927; D.D.S., 1929

Assistant Clinical Professor of Oral Surgery

B.S., College of the City of

Solomon N. Rosenstein. B.S., College of the City of

Frederick Rothenberg.

New

York, 1935; D.D.S., Columbia, 1940; M.D., Rochester, 1950

Professor of Dentistry

New

York, 1929; D.D.S., Columbia, 1930

Assistant Clinical Professor of Dentistry

M.D., Goettingen, 1935; D.D.S., Pennsylvania, 1937

William B.S.,

J.

Savoy.

Clinical Professor of Dentistry

Manhattan, 1931; D.D.S., Columbia, 1935

Julian Schroff.

Assistant Clinical Professor of Dentistry

B.S., College of the City of

New

York, 1930; D.D.S., Columbia, 1934

Clinical Professor of Dentistry CoUege of the City of New York, 1927; D.D.S., Columbia,

Laszlo Schwartz. B.S.,

1942

1931

29

OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION

30

Milton Singer.

A ssistant Clinical Professor of Pediatrics

A.B., Harvard, 1933; M.D., Columbia, 1937

Julius Tarshis.

Assistant Clinical Professor of Dentistry

D.D.S., Pennsylvania, 1949

Assistant Clinical Professor of Dentistry

William A. Verlin.

A.B., Columbia, 1929; D.D.S., 1931

Clifford L.

Whitman.

Clinical Professor of Dentistry

D.D.S., Maryland, 1927

Edward V.

Zegarelli.

Edwin

S.

Robinson Professor of Dentistry

A.B., Columbia, 1934; D.D.S., 1937; M.S., Chicago, 1942

LECTURERS

ASSOCIATE Alfred Gallinek,

M.D. (Neurology)

RESEARCH ASSOCIATES Carlos Dalmau, M.D. (Psychiatry) Sidney L. Horowitz, D.D.S.

George

Stein,

Robert M. Cole, D.D.S. Robert L. Fisher, D.D.S. Allan Fromme, Ph.D. (Psychology) Joseph E. Johnson, D.D.S. Arnold C. Rosenberg, D.D.S.

M.D., D.M.D. ASSISTANTS

INSTRUCTORS

Mark L. Benes, D.D.S. Abraham M. Blechman, D.D.S.

Lionel Abzug, D.D.S.

Seymour Algus, D.D.S.

W. Anderson, D.D.S.

Julien

Harold D. Baurmash, D.D.S. Charles L. Berman, D.D.S. Jack

M.

Breuer, D.D.S.

Stanley S. Heller, D.D.S.

Norman H. Joondeph, Philip Kutner, D.D.S.

P. Levy, D.D.S. (Anatomy) Evald Linder (Dental Technic)

Henry

J.

Loscalzo, D.D.S.

Joseph Luban, D.D.S. Louis Mandel, D.D.S.

Lawrence Marder, D.D.S. George A. Minervini, D.D.S. Bernard Nathanson, D.D.S. John F. O'Connor, M.D. (Psychiatry)

Herbert

I.

I.

Kaplan, D.D.S.

Marvin B. King, D.D.S. Eugene F. Murphy, D.D.S. Russell J. Vanacek, D.D.S.

RESEARCH ASSISTANTS

D.D.S.

Seymour Koster, D.D.S.

Louis

Albert Green, D.D.S.

Jacob

Robert

J.

Huettner, D.D.S.

Solomon L. Katz, D.D.S. CLINICAL ASSISTANTS

James G. Coyle, D.D.S. Saul N. Greenberg, D.D.S. Milton

Jaffe, D.D.S. Gustave Lasoff, D.D.S. Kenneth D. Levin, D.D.S. Richard J. Lowell, D.D.S. Paul Schneider, D.D.S.

Seymour Zeff, D.M.D. PHYSICAL THERAPIST

Oshrain, D.D.S.

Arnold Rosenberg, D.D.S. Janice Schreiber, D.D.S.

Murray Schwartz, D.D.S. Boaz Shattan, D.D.S. Alvin L. Solomon, D.D.S.

Bernard H. Wasserman, D.D.S.

Jetta Hendin, R.P.T.

SPEECH PATHOLOGIST Shulamith Kastein, R.S.P. VISITING

FELLOW

Barbara Williams, M.D. (Pediatrics)

OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION

31

POSTGRADUATE FACULTY COMMITTEE Nicholas A. Di Salvo,

Joseph A. Cuttita

Edward V.

chairman Frank E. Beube

Rudolph H. Friedrich Solomon N. Rosenstein

Gilbert P. Smith,

OTHER ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS OF THE SCHOOL Eileen H. Daly.

Thomas

Assistant to the Registrar of the University

P. Fleming,

M.S.

Librarian

ex

officio

Zegarelli

COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES

0050083554

THE

BIA-PRESBYTERIAN IEDICAL CENTER

\

r-n bus

\VJ

1.

2.

BABIES HOSPITAL PRESBYTERIAN HOSPITAL

10.

CITY DEPT. OF HEALTH SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH AND ADMINISTRATIVE MEDICINE INSTITUTE OF OPHTHALMOLOGY MAXWELL HALL NEUROLOGICAL INSTITUTE

11.

N.Y.

7.

ORTHOPAEDIC HOSPITAL SLOANE HOSPITAL SQUIER UROLOGICAL CLINIC HARKNESS PAVILION POWER HOUSE COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS VANDERBILT CLINIC SCHOOL OF DENTAL AND ORAL SURGERY

N.Y.

3.

4. 5.

6.

To Reach

STATION

8.

9.

12.

13. 14. 15.

N.Y.

STATE PSYCHIATRIC INSTITUTE

BARD HALL HARKNESS MEMORIAL HALL FRANCIS DELAFIELD HOSPITAL, PAULINE A. HARTFORD

N.Y.C.

MEMORIAL CHAPEL

By subway,

the Washington Heights Express of Cortland Park train of the IRT Seventh Avenue. By bus, Fifth Avenue Bus #4 or #5. By car, the Westside Highway exit at the George Washington Bridge. Parking facilities are available at West 164th Street and Fort Washington Avenue.

the

IND

the Medical Center:

Eighth Avenue or the

Van

1917
Schools, Dental, Education, Dental, Graduate
English