Columbia University bulletin : postgraduate courses for dentists

1 Columbia University BULLETIN OF INFORMATION Fifty-sixth Series, No. May 2 ANNOUNCEMENT 26, 1956 OF POSTGRADUATE COURSES FOR DENTISTS SCHOOL...

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Columbia University BULLETIN OF INFORMATION Fifty-sixth Series,

No.

May

2

ANNOUNCEMENT

26,

1956

OF

POSTGRADUATE COURSES FOR DENTISTS SCHOOL OF DENTAL AND ORAL SURGERY OF THE FACULTY OF MEDICINE '1956-19.57

-

l??Uf7 7

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COLUMBIA-PRESBYTERIAN MEDICAL CENTER 630 WEST i68th STREET NEW YORK 32, N.Y.

Columbia l&nihzt&itp ptittetm Fifty-sixth Series,

Issued at

of Snformattoti

May 26,

No. 21

Columbia University, Morningside Heights,

New

York

27, N.Y.,

1956

weekly from

January for forty-six consecutive issues. Reentered as second-class matter August 15, 1952, at the Post Office at New York, N.Y., under the Act of August 24, 1912. Acceptance for

mailing at a special rate of postage provided for in Section 1103, Act of October

3,

1917,

authorized.

The

series includes the

of the several Colleges

made

Report of the President to the Trustees and the Announcements relating to the work of the next year. These are

and Schools

as accurate as possible,

cumstances require.

The

but the right

current

number

is

reserved to

make changes

of any of these

in detail as cir-

Announcements

will be sent

upon written application to the Office of University Admissions, 322 University Hall, Columbia University, New York 27, N.Y. Copies may be obtained in person from the Office of the Secretary, 213 Low Memorial Library. .,

C. U. P. 2,700—1956

S^^/P^ £^

c

PRINTED FOR THE UNIVERSITY BY COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY PRESS

U&

//'

FACULTY OF MEDICINE OFFICERS OF

THE FACULTY

President of the University Grayson Kirk, Ph.D., LL.D Vice President and Provost of the University John A. Krout, Ph.D., L.H.D., LL.D. Vice President in Charge of Willard C. Rappleye, A.M., M.D., Sc.D., Med.ScD. Medical Affairs; Dean of the Faculty of Medicine Associate Dean {Dental and Oral Surgery) Maurice J. Hickey, D.M.D., M.D Associate Dean; Secretary Aura E. Severinghaus, Ph.D., ScD., L.H.D Associate Dean {Public Health) Ray E. Trussell, M.D., M.P.H .

.

.

.

.

.

THE FACULTY Hattie E. Alexander

Dana W. Atchley E. Dwight Barnett James Bordley III Stanley E. Bradley

Harold W. Brown Stanley M. Bysshe E. Gurney Clark Wilfred M. Copenhaver Robert C. Darling D. Anthony D'Esopo

Samuel R. Detwiler John H. Dunnington Robert H. E. Elliott Earl T. Engle John W. Fertig Thomas P. Fleming

Goodwin L. Foster Edmund P. Fowler,

Jr.

Virginia K. Frantz

Magnus

I. Gregersen Franklin M. Hanger, Jr. Maurice J. Hickey George H. Humphreys II M. Ralph Kaufman Yale Kneeland, Jr.

Lawrence

C.

Kolb

John K. Lattimer Tiffany Lawyer, Jr. Eleanor Lee Kenneth M. Lewis Robert F. Loeb John H. McClement Rustin McIntosh Monroe A. McIver Irville H. MacKinnon

Rollo J. Masselink H. Houston Merritt Frederick A. Mettler Carl T. Nelson John L. Nickerson Carl R. Oman Emanuel M. Papper George A. Perera Pool J. Lawrence Charles A. Ragan Willard C. Rappleye Dickinson W. Richards David Rittenberg

Walter S. Root Harry M. Rose Solomon N. Rosenstein William B. Seaman Beatrice C. Seegal David Seegal Aura E. Severinghaus Lawrence W. Sloan Gilbert P. Smith

Harry P. Smith Thomas W. Stevenson Wellington B. Stewart Frank E. Stinchfield Lewis R. Stowe Howard C. Taylor

Ray E. Trussell Joseph C. Turner

Harry B. van Dyke Carmine T. Vicale Shih-Chun Wang Abner Wolf Robert H. Wylie

2



THE FACULTY COMMITTEE ON DENTAL EDUCATION Maurice J. Hickey, Chairman Samuel R. Detwiler

Magnus I. Gregersen Maxwell Karshan Barnet M. Levy Carl R.

Oman

Gilbert P. Smith

Harry P. Smith Lewis R. Stowe Arthur C. Totten Harry B. van Dyke Willard

Harry M. Rose Solomon N. Rosenstein

C. Rappleye, ex officio

Aura E. Severinghaus,

ex

officio

POSTGRADUATE FACULTY COMMITTEE Barnet M. Levy, Chairman Frank E. Beube Carl R. Oman Solomon N. Rosenstein

Gilbert P. Smith Lewis R. Stowe

Arthur C. Totten Maurice J. Hickey, ex

officio

ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF

AT THE SCHOOL OF DENTAL AND ORAL SURGERY Anna Berhowsky Thomas

P.

Fleming, M.S

Assistant to the Register

Librarian

POSTGRADUATE PROGRAM The postgraduate program

of the School of Dental

and Oral Surgery includes the

following four types of study:

Section

These are noncredit

I:

Courses for General Practitioners

courses, full-time

and

part-time, varying in length

from one

to

thirty weeks, designed as refresher courses in special aspects of dentistry particularly suit-

able for general practitioners. See pages 4-5.

Section This program

is

made up

II:

Courses for Orthodontists

of intensive short courses designed to

meet the needs of

recognized orthodontists for training in a particular aspect of their specialty. See page

Section

III:

6.

Training for Specialties

Full-Time Instruction. These are full-time courses of from nine months to two calendar years' duration offered for graduates of dental schools in the fields of oral diagnosis

and

roentgenology, oral surgery, orthodontics, pedodontics, and periodontology. These courses lead to the

award

of a certificate of training. See pages 7-15.

Half-Time Instruction.

A

two academic years and

half-time course in pedodontics of

a

half-time course in periodontology of four academic years are also offered. Both courses lead to the

award

of a certificate of training. See pages 7-10

and 14-17.

Section IV: Training in the Basic Medical Sciences

A

limited

number

of fellowships are available for dental graduates

prepare for careers in dental education and research.

The

who

desire to

courses require full-time at-

tendance and are under the direction of the Departments of Anatomy, Biochemistry, Microbiology, Pharmacology, and Physiology. See page

ADMISSION, REGISTRATION,

18.

AND

FEES

All courses are designed for dentists duly licensed to practice dentistry in their respective

may

states (licensure

ments for each

be waived by the Dean in special cases) Specific admission requireinformation on registration and fees, are given on the .

section, as well as

following pages. All correspondence and requests for information should be addressed to the Committee on Postgraduate Admissions, School of Dental and Oral Surgery, 630 West 168th Street, New York 32, N. Y. Foreign Students. The New York State Department of Education has special requirements with which students who are not citizens of this country must comply. Foreign students desiring to apply for admission should communicate with the Dean.

WITHDRAWAL An

honorable discharge will be granted

to

any student in good academic standing and

not subject to discipline. Students withdrawing are required to notify the Registrar in writing immediately.

SECTION

COURSES FOR GENERAL PRACTITIONERS

I:

This program of courses will provide opportunities for advanced study in special fields who wish to be better prepared to meet their responsibilities to the public.

for dentists

The

on clinical practice. major objective of the program is to provide opportunities for the instruction requested by returned servicemen and general practitioners. These courses are not designed to lead to specialization and may not be counted for credit toward any degree or certificate conferred by the University. courses of instruction place particular emphasis

A

ADMISSION, REGISTRATION,

AND

FEES

Application for admission to all Section I and II courses should be made not later than one month prior to the beginning of the course. The full tuition fee must be forwarded with the application and is not refundable unless an applicant is not accepted by the Committee on Postgraduate Admissions, or unless the course is canceled. Checks should be made payable to Columbia University. If an applicant applies for more than one course, a separate application and check must be submitted for each course. Applicants who may

be eligible for

New York

State

War

Service Scholarships for Veterans will be eligible for

refunds of tuition up to the limit allowed therein, upon presentation to the Registrar's office of

scholarship notification.

Applicants

who have

received notification of acceptance will register

on the opening

date of the course, unless otherwise specified, at the office of the Registrar,

Room

7-201,

School of Dental and Oral Surgery, 630 West 168th Street, New York 32, N.Y. All applications, correspondence, and requests for information should be addressed

Committee on Postgraduate Admissions, School West 1 68th Street, New York 32, N.Y.

to the

of Dental

and Oral Surgery, 630

ESTIMATED EXPENSES An

itemized estimate of the cost of the Section

be understood

making

that,

I

and

II

courses

is

given below.

Tuition

Field

$200.00 150.00 300.00 200.00 200.00 200.00 300.00 75.00

Diagnosis Periodontology Periodontology Orthodontics Orthodontics Orthodontics Orthodontics Orthodontics Clinical physiology

403 409

409A 419 420 422 426 427 428

of occlusion Principles of occlusion

429

must

substitutions in cases of a supply shortage, these are only estimates.

PD Count

It

because of the fluctuation of prices and the occasional necessity for

Instruments

Estimated Total

Books $31.50

$180.00 180.00 175.00 110.00 370.00

$231.50 330.00 480.00 375.00 310.00 585.00 300.00 75.00

15.00

150.00

150.00

150.00

150.00

STATEMENTS OF ATTENDANCE In

all

Section

I

and

II

courses, a short statement of attendance signed

of the University will be issued

on

request. Students

who

write to the Registrar, School of Dental and Oral Surgery, Street,

New York

32,

N.Y.

by the Registrar

desire such statements should

Room

7-201, 630

West 168th

COURSES FOR GENERAL PRACTITIONERS



5

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION The

University reserves the right to withdraw or modify the course of instruction or

change the instructors

to

may

as

be necessary.

Diagnosis

PD 403 —Diagnosis. and

associates.

September

20,

1956-May

One two-hour seminar

24, 1957. Professors

Stowe and Zegarelli

each week. Tuition $200.

A sis

comprehensive coverage of the diseases of the mouth, jaw bones, and related structures, with emphaon the application of basic scientific knowledge for a clearer and more practical understanding of these

diseases.

Periodontology

PD

—Periodontology.

409

September

20,

1956-May

1,

1957. Professor

Beube and

asso-

Tuition $150.

ciates.

W.

1-4.

This course consists of lectures, discussions and demonstrations, diagnosis, charting and treatment planning of periodontal diseases; nutritional and metabolic factors and development of periodontal methods. Clinical practice will include conservative treatment, surgical treatment, and pictorial demonstrations will be given.

PD 409A—Periodontology. ciates.

W.

20,

1956-May

1,

1957. Professor

Beube and

asso-

Tuition $300. 9-12 and 1-4.

Same course content

PD

September

and occlusal adjustment. Clinical

429



as

PD

409 with ninety hours of additional

Principles of occlusion.

May

15, 16,

and

clinical practice.

17, 1957. Professor

Fox and

associates.

Tuition $150. This course is designed to present the fundamentals of occlusion of the teeth in relation to the physiology and pathology of the periodontal supporting tissues. The entire course will be directed toward correlating the principles of occlusion to clinical criteria and therapeutic endeavors.

Clinical Oral Physiology

PD 428 —The and 9-12 and

22, 23,

clinical

physiology of occlusion. December 26, 27, and 28, 1956, and Schwartz and associates. Tuition $150.

May

24, 1957. Professor

1-4.

Class limited to sixteen.

The tion

clinical physiology of occlusion will be studied through lectures, demonstrations, and the examinaand treatment of patients from the Temporomandibular Joint Clinic. Current practices and concepts of

occlusion will be discussed in seminars.

PD

432

—The diagnosis and treatment

of temporomandibular joint pain

and dysfunction.

April 3-5, 1957. Professor Schwartz and associates. Tuition $150.

9-12 and 1-4. The

clinical physiology and pathology of the temporomandibular joint will be studied through lectures and demonstrations. Therapeutic procedures developed through the investigations of the temporomandibular joint clinic will be presented. The relationships to present concepts and practices of occlusion will also

be discussed.

Pedodontics

PD 353 —Theory and

practice of pedodontics.

Two

one-hour lectures and/or conferences

each week. September through May. Professor Rosenstein. Tuition $200.

Th. 9:30-11:30. First term. Lectures

and conferences on

all factors relating to

treatment planning and measures for con-

trol of oral disease in children.

Second term. Conferences on

factors relating to prevention of disease of the teeth

tures in children; includes reports

on pertinent

literature.

and surrounding

struc-

SECTION

II:

COURSES FOR ORTHODONTISTS

These courses will provide opportunities for orthodontists to become better prepared in certain technical and clinical aspects of their specialty. Admission requirements and procedure, payment of fees, and information about registration are the same as for Section I courses. See page 4. The University reserves the right to withdraw or modify the courses of instruction or to change the instructors as may be necessary.

PD 419—Twin-wire appliance therapy.

December

3-8, 1956. Dr. Johnson

and

associates.

Tuition $200. Enrollment limited.

M. through

F. 9-12

and

1-6; S. 9-12.

This course will consist of lectures and technical training in the construction of anterior and molar bands, tubular lingual arches, staple lingual arches, the twin-wire arch mechanism, and a working retainer, and the basic principles of treatment associated with the application of twin-wire appliance therapy for the correction of the malocclusion of the teeth.

PD

420

—Theory and

practice of extra-oral forces.

March

25-30, 1957. Professor Jay and

Tuition $200. Enrollment limited.

associates.

M. through

F. 9-12

and

1-6; S. 9-12.

This course presents a total concept of orthodontic diagnosis,

treatment planning, and appliance technique. It applies the basic principles of extra-oral forces as a complete approach to orthodontic therapy, rather than as an auxiliary aid to existing therapies. The course will be presented by means of lectures and clinical and laboratory demonstrations, as well as technical and clinical practice. Audio-visual and clinical aids will be used to clarify procedures.



PD

422 Edgewise appliance therapy. February 25-March and associates. Tuition $200. Enrollment limited. M. through F. 9-12, 1-6, and 7-9; S. 9-12 and 1-6.

2, 1957.

Professor

Whitman

This course includes: the technique of constructing and assembling the edgewise appliance; its applicaand manipulation; the philosophy governing its use; the treatment of various types of malocclusions. wealth of visual-aid material in the form of slides, movies, charts, etc., will be used. The laboratory technique will be supplemented by observation of actual patients in various stages of treatment. Lectures, discussions, and question-and-answer periods have been arranged to acquaint the specialist with every phase of the edgewise technique and its most recent refinements. This course is planned to be of the greatest practical value to the orthodontist and only the necessary essentials of the theory will be included. Lectures in diagnosis and anatomy of the head and neck (anatomy lectures by Dr. Harry Shapiro) and efficiency and time-saving methods in the use of the edgewise appliance will be stressed throughout the entire course. tion

A

PD and



426

Clinical orthodontic practice. Sixteen

weeks by arrangement. Professor Totten

Tuition $300. Enrollment limited. Full-time, M. through F. 9-12 and 1-4:30. associates.

Supervised clinical instruction in the gnathostatic method; the manipulation of the labio-lingual, extraand twin-wire appliances; retainers; and bite plates.

oral force, edgewise,

PD

427

—Applied cephalometrics. June

3-5, 1957. Professor Witol

and

associates.

Tuition

$75. Enrollment limited.

M. Tu. W. 9-12 and

1-5.

This course in cephalometrics will consist of the theory and practice of taking standardized head roentgenograms by utilizing a cephalostat; laboratory practice in the methods of making tracings, and the clinical evaluation of the headfilms. Diagnostic procedures in cephalometrics according to the analysis of

Downs, Margolis, Steiner, and Wylie will be discussed. Lectures in the following subjects will be inanatomy of the skull; anthropology; principles of roentgenology, and clinical photography. Emphasis will be placed on the practical application of cephalometric techniques in orthodontic diagnosis. cluded:

SECTION

III:

PROGRAMS IN DENTAL SPECIALTIES

COURSES LEADING TO A CERTIFICATE OF TRAINING The program

of courses leading to the certificate of training

better qualified practitioners of dentistry. It

vanced study in special

is

Training in these courses

fields.

is

based on the need for

intended to provide opportunities for ad-

may

be counted toward

speciali-

zation. Fields of specialization are as follows:

Oral Diagnosis and Roentgenology Classes will begin September 20, 1956,

This

is

a one-year course in the theory

and end May 22, 1957. and practice of oral diagnosis and roentgenology

designed to prepare dentists for specialized practice or clinical teaching in

this field.

Oral Surgery Classes for the

first

year will begin September 20, 1956, and end September

Classes for the second year will begin September, 1957,

and end September,

5,

1957.

1958, the

exact dates to be announced.

and associated surgery; and general anesthesia; the diagnosis and surgical treatment of diseases, malformation and injuries of the jaws and their related tissues; basic-science lectures, laboratory, and seminar instruction in anatomy, pathology, and other fields pertinent and Instruction will include clinical practice in the removal of teeth

training in local

related to clinical oral surgery.

A

one-year internship

is

prerequisite for admission to this

program.

Orthodontics Classes will begin

This

is

dontics.

September

20, 1956,

and end

in January, 1958.

a three-term course designed to prepare dentists for specialized practice in ortho-

The

course will include lectures and seminar instruction in the basic sciences,

growth and development, the theory and

practice of orthodontics,

and other

fields related

to clinical orthodontics.

The

gnathostatic

nosis will be based

ment

method will be used in making a study model and classification. Diagon cephalometrics and other analytical orthodontic procedures. A treat-

will be planned for each case.

The instruction will include laboratory procedures; the theory and philosophy of treatment with various appliances: removable, labio-lingual, twin-wire, extra-oral forces, and edgewise. Satisfactory completion of clinical training under the direction of members of the orthodontic staff

is

required.

Pedodontics Full-time: Classes will begin September 20, 1956,

Half-time: Classes for the 22, 1957.

The

curriculum, both

full-

and

and end May

half-time, consists of courses in applied basic sciences

and other

including dentistry for pediatric patients. There

and

is

closely related phases of dentis-

also assignment to special courses

child development. In pedodontic conference

clinical practice, principles of the various courses are related to the

telligent

and complete dental care

May

dates for the second year will be announced.

for clinical practice in pedodontics

in pediatrics, applied nutrition,

22, 1957.

year will begin on September 20, 1956, and end

The beginning and ending

and courses try,

first

for children.

and

requirements for in-

8

PROGRAMS



DENTAL SPECIALTIES

IN

Cerebral Palsy Dental Fellowship:

Two Palsy

fellowships have been established by the Dental Guidance Council and sponsored by the United Cerebral Palsy of New York City, Inc., to

for Cerebral train dentists

in special medico-dental problems in the treatment of children with cerebral palsy.

The

Cerebral Palsy Dental Fellowship

is

a two-year full-time

program and includes

applied basic-science courses and medical and dental courses in various aspects of pedo-

and cerebral palsy. During the second year there is emphasis on complete inand outpatient cerebral palsy dental service. Each fellowship carries an annual

dontics patient

stipend of $3,000 to $3,600.

Periodontology

F nil-Time Classes for the first year will begin

September

20, 1956,

and end May 22, and end May,

Classes for the second year will begin September, 1957,

1957. 1958, the exact

dates to be announced.

This

a course in the theory

is

and

practice of periodontology to prepare the dentist for

and periodontia combined with related science and theory. problem is offered. The course will be given in

specialized service in this field. Practical diagnosis, treatment planning,

treatment

—conservative

Training in the

two

and

scientific

surgical

—are

approach to a

parts, covering a period of

two academic years. Full University credit will be given though the student does not continue for the

for all courses successfully completed even

advanced study of the second period.

Half-Time Classes for the

first

year will begin September 20, 1956, and end

May

22, 1957;

morning

sessions.

The beginning and ending (morning

dates for the second year (afternoon sessions), third year

and fourth year (afternoon sessions) will be announced. This half-time program will contain the same material as presented in the sessions),

full-time

course. Full University credit will be given for the successful completion of the courses in

any one or more years even though the student does not continue for the four-year period.

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS Applicants for admission to the School of Dental and Oral Surgery as candidates for the certificate of training

must be

licensed to practice dentistry within the United States

or a foreign country.

The

must request

that official transcripts of his preprofessional and profesforwarded to the Committee on Postgraduate Admissions directly from the colleges and universities which he has attended. A personal interview and proof of current licensure are also required. Such proof must be in the form of a certificate or statement issued by an official of the licensing body concerned. Acceptance Fee. Within two weeks after an applicant receives notice of acceptance, he must indicate his intention to enroll and forward a check or money order for $50 payable to Columbia University. Upon registration, the acceptance fee will be deducted from his tuition. If the applicant does not register for the specific session to which he has been ad-

applicant

sional training be

mitted, the acceptance fee will not be refunded.

PROGRAMS

IN

DENTAL SPECIALTIES



9

REGISTRATION Dates for registration for 1956-1957 are Monday, September

17, Tuesday, September and Wednesday, September 19, 1956, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Registration at a later date is permitted only upon payment of a late registration fee, satisfactory cause for the delay having been shown.

18,

FEES The

University Statutes provide that tuition fees, the University fee, and the student

health service fee are payable each term in advance. Registration will not be complete until such fees are paid,

nor are the privileges of the University available to any student Checks should be drawn to the order of Columbia

until the completion of his registration.

University.

Payment

of fees after the last day of registration automatically imposes the

statutory charge of $3.00.

The following

fees,

No

reduction

is

made

for late registration.

payable in several installments, are prescribed by statute for courses

leading to the certificate of training and are subject to change at any time at the discretion of the Trustees: a)

University fee

Orthodontics, payable in three installments Pedodontics, payable in two installments Oral diagnosis and roentgenology, payable in two installments Periodontology, full-time First year, payable in two installments Second year, payable in two installments Periodontology, half-time, for four years Oral surgery First year, payable in three installments Second year, payable in three installments b)

New York For

1,200.00 900.00 900.00 900.00

900.00 900.00 1,800.00 900.00 900.00

to

pay the annual premium of the Associated Hospital Service of and to pay part of the cost of the student health service.

for hospital insurance

all students,

per academic year

d)

Instrument case rental (for each term of orthodontics)

e)

Application fees

For each deficiency or special examination For renewal of application for a certificate

25 .00 2 .50

10 .00 I .00

Late fees

For late registration For late application for a deficiency or special examination For late application, or renewal of application, for a degree g)

72.00 72.00

Student health service fee

This fee will be used

/)

48.00 48.00 96.00

Tuition fee Orthodontics, payable in three installments Pedodontics, payable in two installments Oral diagnosis and roentgenology, payable in two installments Pedodontics, half-time, payable in two installments each year for two years Periodontology, full-time First year, payable in two installments Second year, payable in two installments Periodontology, half-time, payable in two installments each year, for four years Oral surgery First year, payable in two installments Second year, payable in two installments

c)

72.00 48.00 48.00

Rebates In cases of withdrawal, a proportionate rebate will be made subject to the University policy. University fee, the student health service fee, application fees, and late fees are not

The

subject to rebate.

3 .00 5 .00 5 .00

10

ORAL DIAGNOSIS AND ROENTGENOLOGY



ESTIMATED EXPENSES As an aid in determining the approximate cost of books, instruments, and supplies needed to pursue the certificate of training courses, an estimate of the expenses in each course is given below. It must be understood that, because of the fluctuation of prices and the occasional

necessity for

making

substitutions in cases of supply shortage, these

are only estimates. Tuition

and

Course

Oral diagnosis and roentgenology Oral Surgery Orthodontics Pedodontics full-time Pedodontics half-time Periodontology full-time Periodontology half-time

$

Books

Estimated Total

$ 57-0° 125.00 100.00 83.00 83.00 92.00 92.00

1,030.00 2,071.00 2,004.50 1,056.00 1,081.00 2,233.00 2,283.00

Instruments

fees

973.00 1,994.00 1,304.00 973.00

$600.00

998.00 1,946.00 1,996.00

195.00 195.00

CERTIFICATE REQUIREMENTS number

1.

Satisfactory completion of the prescribed

2.

Successful completion of written, oral, or practical examinations at the

of courses.

end of the

residence period, the type of examination to be determined by the divisions of the

Department of Dentistry. 3.

Attendance at the hospitals or institutions separated from the Medical Center but with Columbia University for special courses when assigned.

affiliated 4.

Evidence satisfactory to the Committee on Postgraduate Instruction that the candidate has completed all the specified requirements for the certificate of training.

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION The to

University reserves the right to withdraw or modify the courses of instruction or

change the instructors

CT

300—

as

may

be necessary.

Biological principles of dentistry.

weeks. Professor Levy and

Two

sessions each

week

for twenty-two

staff.

This course is a prerequisite for all certificate of training programs offered by the dental school. It is predicated on the assumption that dentists, regardless of specialty, must acquire a general knowledge of the body as a whole and a thorough and comprehensive understanding of the oral cavity and its contents. The course is an attempt to integrate the various basic sciences and to correlate them with the clinical practice of dentistry.

ORAL DIAGNOSIS AND ROENTGENOLOGY FIRST TERM:

CT

303

SEPTEMBER

20, I956,

TO JANUARY



Clinical practice in oral diagnosis

Professors Stowe

and

l6,

I957

and roentgenology.

Six sessions each week.

Zegarelli.

Clinical practice in history-taking, comprehensive oral diagnosis, treatment planning, pulp abnormalities, diseases of the mouth and jaw bones.

roentgenologic

interpretation, diagnosis of

CT

329

—Diagnosis. One two-hour seminar each week.

Identical to

CT

331



PD

403; for description, see page

Maxillofacial anatomy.

Professor Shapiro. Review of anatomy of head and neck.

Two

Professors Stowe

and

Zegarelli.

5.

hours each week. Lectures and demonstrations.

ORAL SURGERY



11



CT

334 Roentgenology. One two-hour session each week. Professors Stowe, Zegarelli, and Budowsky. Principles of dental X-ray technique with emphasis on mandibular joint techniques.

SECOND TERM: JANUARY 17 TO

CT

303 and

CT

329

MAY

lateral,

anteroposterior, sinus,

and temporo-

22, I957

are continued

from the

first

term.

ORAL SURGERY First

SEPTEMBER

FIRST TERM:

CT

311

20, I956,

TO JANUARY



Clinical oral surgery practice.

Year l6, 1 957

Six clinical three-hour sessions each week.

Professors Schroff, Hickey, Savoy, Nathan, Bundrant,

and

staff.

Discussions, demonstrations, and supervised clinical practice in the application of forceps and elevators for the extraction of teeth, and its associated surgery; the preparation of the mouth for dentures. Clinical practice in the use of general anesthesia for oral surgery.

CT 312—Theory

and practice in general and staff.

anesthesia.

One

three-hour seminar each week.

Professor Fierstein

This course will consist of lectures, seminars, and training in general anesthesia for oral surgery.

CT

329

—Diagnosis. One two-hour seminar each week. PD

Identical to

CT

333

403; for description, see page

—Theory and

Professors Stowe

and

Zegarelli.

5.

practice of oral surgery.

Two

one-hour lectures, demonstrations,

or clinical conferences each week. Professors Schroff, Hickey, Savoy, Nathan, Bundrant,

and

staff.

This course is devoted to diagnosis for surgical treatment of diseases, malformation, and injuries of the jaws and their related tissues; fractures of the facial bones; cysts; salivary glands; neoplasms; infections; and the removal of impacted teeth.

SECOND TERM: JANUARY

CT 311, CT 312, CT THIRD TERM:

CT

311

MAY

17

TO

MAY

329, and

22, I957

CT 333

23 TO SEPTEMBER

5,

are continued

from the

first

term.

I957

continued from the second term; five mornings and five afternoons per week.

is

Second Year FIRST TERM:

CT

311



SEPTEMBER

20, I956,

l6,

1957

Clinical oral surgery practice. Five clinical three-hour sessions each week. Pro-

fessors Schroff, Hickey, Savoy,

CT 313 — Surgical anatomy ture each

TO JANUARY

week

Nathan, Bundrant, and

staff.

Continuation of

and the head and neck. One two-hour Rankow.

of the oral cavity

for sixteen weeks. Dr.

first year.

lec-

Demonstrations, lectures, and discussions. Applications of the basic anatomy to oral surgical procedures anatomy of local anesthesia, oral-antral complications, alveolar bone surgery, soft-tissue plastic surgery of the oral cavity, surgical preparation of soft tissues, traumatic surgery, and acute infections. The surgical procedures seen in maxillofacial and head and neck surgery are also are stressed, including such topics as

discussed.

CT

333

—Theory and

practice of oral surgery. Continuation of first year.

12

ORTHODONTICS



CT 334—Roentgenology. One two-hour

session each

week. Professors Stowe, Zegarelli,

and Budowsky. Principles of dental X-ray technique with emphasis on mandibular joint techniques.

CT



347

One

Maxillofacial surgery.

anteroposterior,

lateral,

sinus,

and temporo-

three-hour session each week. Professor Hickey.

This course will consist of observation and assistance in the operating room.

SECOND TERM: JANUARY

CT

7 TO

MAY

22, I957

311 (four morning and four afternoon sessions each week),

are continued

THIRD TERM:

CT

1

311

is

from the

MAY

first

23, 1957,

CT

333, and

CT

347

term.

TO SEPTEMBER, I958

continued from the second term; five mornings and

five afternoons

each

week.

ORTHODONTICS Sixteen FIRST TERM:

CT



307

SEPTEMBER

20, I956,

TO JANUARY

Months l6,

I957

morning sessions each week. and Whitman, and Drs. Loughlin, Tarshis,

Clinical orthodontic practice. Five three-hour

Professors Totten, Galton, Witol,

Nahoum, and

Jay,

Breuer.

Intensive technical instruction in the gnathostatic method: the assembling and manipulation on typodonts of the labiolingual, edgewise, extra-oral forces, and twin-wire appliances, retainers, and the bite plates. These procedures are followed by supervised clinical practice.

CT

315

—Theory and

practice of orthodontics. Five one-hour lectures each week. Pro-

fessors Totten, Galton, Witol, Jay,

and Whitman, and Drs. Loughlin, Tarshis, Nahoum,

and Breuer. Lectures, discussions, and demonstrations by members of the orthodontic staff, in lated with clinical observation and practice. Basic principles of metallurgy.

which theory

is

corre-



CT 327 Dental anthropology and evolution. One hour lecture each week. Professor Oppenheimer. Seminars on growth and development of bone will be included in

—Diagnosis. One two-hour seminar each week. anatomy. One two-hour CT 331 — CT

329

Maxillofacial

lecture

this course.

Professors Stowe

and

Zegarelli.

and demonstration each week.

Professor Shapiro. Review of anatomy of head and neck.

CT

340

—Psychiatry

dentistry.

Ten

and psychosomatic medicine applied to the general practice of one and one-half hour lectures. Drs. Horowitz and

sessions consisting of

Moulton. The purpose of this course is to give dentists a background for evaluating certain dental problems in the light of emotional factors and to indicate how such considerations may influence therapy.

SECOND TERM: JANUARY 17 TO

CT

307,

CT

315,

CT

MAY

327, and

22, I957

CT

329 are continued from the

first

term.

.

PEDODONTICS CT 310—

Pediatrics related to dentistry.

Two

lecture hours



13

and one demonstration hour

each week. Drs. Davis, Schlaeger, and Wilking. This course provides a synopsis of pediatrics and emphasizes certain peculiarities of growing children of significance in orthodontics. Considerable time is devoted to the basic concepts and practical aspects of the psychologic care of children.

THIRD TERM:

MAY

CT 307

CT 315

and

23, 1957,

CT 343A—Public

TO JANUARY, I958

are continued

from the second term.

health related to orthodontics. Six one-hour lectures. Dr. Ackerman.

Public health and orthodontics.

CT 343B—Oral surgery

related to orthodontics. Six one-hour lectures. Professors

Hickey

and Schroff Practical considerations of unerupted teeth, extreme prognathism, intermaxillary wiring,

and

cleft-palate

cases.

— follow-up CT 370— Speech pathology and CT

361

One two-hour

Maxillofacial

clinic.

Languages and speech development

in children

session each

Four one-hour

therapy.

lectures.

week. Dr. Rankow.

Mrs. Kastein.

and speech pathology and therapy

in the patient with

oral impairments.

PEDODONTICS One Year SEPTEMBER

FIRST TERM:

CT 312—Theory and Professor Fierstein

20, I956,

—Full-Time

TO JANUARY

l6,

I957

practice in general anesthesia.

and

One

three-hour seminar each week.

staff.

This course will consist of lectures, seminars, and training in general anesthesia for oral surgery.



CT

327 Dental anthropology and evolution. One hour Oppenheimer. Seminars on growth and development of bone will be included in

CT

329

331

week. Professor

this course.

—Diagnosis. One two-hour seminar each week. Professors Stowe and

Identical to

CT

lecture each



PD

403; for description, see page

Maxillofacial anatomy.

Zegarelli.

5.

One two-hour

lecture

and demonstration each week.

Professor Shapiro. Review

of

anatomy of head and neck.

CT 334—Roentgenology. One two-hour

session each

week. Professors Stowe, Zegarelli,

and Budowsky. Principles of dental X-ray technique with emphasis on mandibular joint techniques.

CT and

351



Clinical practice in pedodontics.

Four

lateral,

anteroposterior,

sessions each

sinus,

and temporo-

week. Professor Rosenstein

staff.

Supervised clinical practice in pedodontics and related fields. Includes management of juvenile patients, particularly the very young, and dental care for children referred from out-patient hospital clinics. In addition to the exercise of broad caries control measures, emphasis is placed on evaluation of cariogenic factors in rampant cases, and measures for improvement.

CT 353 —Theory and practice of pedodontics. Two one-hour

lectures

and/or conferences

each week. Professor Rosenstein. Lectures and conferences on all factors relating to treatment planning and measures for control of oral disease in children.

14

CT

'

PERI ODONTOLOGY— FULL TIME

365

—Orthodontics

related to pedodontics

sion every other week. Dr.

A

and periodontology. One three-hour

ses-

Nahoum.

survey of orthodontics, classification, diagnosis, growth and development, and treatment planning.

Seminars and laboratory sessions.

Special courses in applied nutrition

SECOND TERM: JANUARY 17 TO Except for

CT

310



CT

327,

CT

MAY

and child development are

22, 1957

CT

331, and

also required.

334,

Pediatrics related to dentistry.

the first-term courses are continued.

all

Two

lecture hours

and one demonstration hour

each week. Drs. Davis, Schlaeger, and Wilking. This course provides a synopsis of pediatrics and emphasizes certain peculiarities of growing children is devoted to the basic concepts and practical aspects of

of significance in orthodontics. Considerable time the psychologic care of children.

CT 353 —Theory and practice of pedodontics. Two one-hour

lectures

and/or conferences

each week. Professor Rosenstein. Conferences on factors relating to prevention of disease of the teeth and surrounding structures in children; includes reports

CT

on pertinent

—Speech pathology and

370

literature.

therapy. Four one-hour lectures. Mrs. Kastein.

Language and speech development in children and speech pathology and therapy

in the patient with

oral impairment.

Continuation of special course in child development.

Two The same curriculum

is

Years

—Half-Time

followed for half-time students; hours by arrangement.

PERIODONTOLOGY—FULL-TIME First

JANUARY

FIRST TERM: SEPTEMBER 20, I956, TO

CT

Year l6,

I957



Clinical practice in periodontology. Five sessions each

305

Friday. Professor Beube

and

week, Monday through

staff.

Demonstrations and practice in periodontal diagnosis including soft-tissue lesions of the mouth, ment-planning, and conservative and surgical periodontal treatment.

CT

—Diagnosis. One two-hour seminar each week.

329

Identical to

CT

331



PD

403; for description, see page

Maxillofacial anatomy.

Professors Stowe

and

treat-

Zegarelli.

5.

One two-hour

lecture

and demonstration each week.

Professor Shapiro. Review of anatomy of head and neck.

CT



339 Theory and practice of periodontology. One hour Beube and staff.

CT

340

—Psychiatry

dentistry.

Ten

lecture each week. Professor

and psychosomatic medicine applied to the general practice of one and one-half hour lectures. Drs. Horowitz and

sessions consisting of

Moulton. The purpose of this course is to give dentists a background for evaluating certain dental problems in the light of emotional factors; and to indicate how such considerations may influence therapy.

PERIODONTOLOGY—HALF TIME CT 341 —Review Professor Beube

CT

373

of the literature in periodontology.

and

One two-hour seminar



IS

each week.

staff.

—Temporomandibular

joint

and

occlusion.

One two-hour

and seminar

lecture

presentation each week. Professor Fox.

CT 374



Principles of surgery.

Ten one and

one-half hour lectures. Dr.

Rankow.

Basic fundamentals of general surgery and surgical physiology are presented as a background to the care of patients.

SECOND TERM: JANUARY 17 TO

CT

305,

CT

CT

339, and

MAY

22, I957

341 are continued from the

CT 353 —Theory and practice of pedodontics. Two

first

term.

one-hour lectures and/or conferences

each week. Professor Rosenstein.

—Treatment-planning

CT 354

Beube and

CT

375

in periodontology.

One hour

seminar each week. Professor

staff.

—Fundamentals

of medicine.

Ten one and

one-half hour lectures and ten clini-

Dr. Rankow.

cal sessions.

The basic mechanisms and cardinal manifestations of medical diseases are discussed. Patients are presented to emphasize bedside techniques in history-taking and differential diagnosis.

Second Year FIRST TERM: SEPTEMBER 20, I956, TO

CT

305,

CT

341, and

CT

354

JANUARY

are continued



CT

l6, 1 957

334 Roentgenology. One two-hour and Budowsky.

from the

session each

Principles of dental X-ray technique with emphasis

mandibular

CT

related to pedodontics

sion every other week. Dr.

A

week. Professors Stowe, Zegarelli,

lateral,

anteroposterior,

sinus,

and temporo-

joint techniques.

—Orthodontics

365

on

first year.

and periodontology. One three-hour

ses-

Nahoum.

survey of orthodontics, classification, diagnosis, growth and development, and treatment planning.

Seminars and laboratory sessions.

CT



369 Student seminar Beube and staff.

in periodontology.

One two-hour seminar

each week. Pro-

fessor

CT

373

—Temporomandibular

joint

and

occlusion.

One two-hour

lecture

and seminar

presentation each week. Professor Fox.

SECOND TERM: JANUARY Continuation of

all

1

7 TO

MAY

22, I957

first-term courses except

CT

334.

PERIODONTOLOGY— HALF-TIME First

FIRST TERM:

CT sor



SEPTEMBER

20, I956, TO

JANUARY

Year l6,

I957

305 Clinical practice in periodontology. Three morning Beube and staff.

sessions each

week. Profes-

Demonstrations and practice in periodontal diagnosis including soft-tissue lesions of the mouth, ment-planning, and conservative and surgical periodontal treatment.

treat-

16



PERI OD

ONTOLOGY— HALF TIME

CT 339—Theory and Beube and

CT

341

—Review

of the literature in periodontology.

and

Professor Beube

CT

lecture each

week. Professor

One two-hour seminar

each week.

staff.

—Temporomandibular

373

One hour

practice of periodontology.

staff.

joint

and

One two-hour

occlusion.

lecture

and seminar

presentation each week. Professor Fox.

SECOND TERM: JANUARY 17 TO

MAY

22, I957

All four first-term courses are continued.

CT

354

—Treatment-planning

Professor Beube

and

One two-hour seminar

in periodontology.

each week.

staff.

Second Year FIRST TERM:

CT

305



SEPTEMBER

329

331

staff.

1

957

Two

Continuation of

three-hour afternoon sessions each

first

year.

—Diagnosis. One two-hour seminar each week.

Identical to

CT

l6,

Clinical practice in periodontology.

week. Professor Beube and

CT

JANUARY

20, I956, TO



PD

403; for description, see page

Maxillofacial anatomy.

Professors Stowe

and

Zegarelli.

5.

One two-hour

lecture

and demonstration each week.

Professor Shapiro. Review of anatomy of head and neck.

CT

—Psychiatry

340

dentistry.

Ten

and psychosomatic medicine applied to the general practice of one and one-half hour lectures. Drs. Horowitz and

sessions consisting of

Moulton. The purpose of this course is to give dentists a background for evaluating certain dental problems in the light of emotional factors; and to indicate how such considerations may influence therapy.

SECOND TERM: JANUARY

CT

305

CT

365

is

1

7 TO

continued from the

—Orthodontics

first

22, I957

term.

related to pedodontics

sion every other week. Dr.

A

MAY

and periodontology. One three-hour

ses-

Nahoum.

survey of orthodontics, classification, diagnosis, growth and development, and treatment planning.

Seminars and laboratory sessions.

Third Year FIRST TERM:

CT

305

is

SEPTEMBER

20, I956,

TO JANUARY

continued from the second year;

l6,

CT

I957

341 and

CT

354

are continued

from the

first year.

CT



334 Roentgenology. One two-hour and Budowsky.

session each

Principles of dental X-ray technique with emphasis on mandibular joint techniques.

week. Professors Stowe, Zegarelli,

lateral,

anteroposterior, sinus,

and temporo-

PERIODONT OLOGY—HALF TIME CT 365 —Orthodontics

related to pedodontics

sion every other week. Dr.

A



and periodontology. One three-hour

11 ses-

Nahoum.

survey of orthodontics, classification, diagnosis, growth and development, and treatment planning.

Seminars and laboratory sessions.



CT 369 Student seminar Beube and staff.

CT

373

in periodontology.

—Temporomandibular

joint

and

One two-hour seminar

occlusion.

presentation each week. Professor Fox.

SECOND TERM: JANUARY TO MAY, I958 All first-term courses, except

CT

334, are continued.

Fourth Year FIRST TERM: SEPTEMBER, I958, TO JANUARY, I959

CT

305

is

continued from the third year.

SECOND TERM: JANUARY TO MAY, I959

CT

305

is

continued from the

first

term.

One two-hour

each week. Professor

lecture

and seminar

TRAINING IN THE BASIC MEDICAL SCIENCES

SECTION

IV:

In recognition of the need for comprehensive training in the basic medical sciences and to qualify graduates in dentistry as teachers

and research

and

investigators, fellowships are offered

anatomy, biochemistry, microbiology, pharmacology, and physiology. Fellows will normally be enrolled under the Faculty of Pure Science as prospective candidates for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. Appointments will be made on a yearly (twelve-month) basis, with opportunity for renewal or extension at the discretion of the executive officers of the basic medical science departments involved. The specific objectives of the program are:

for study

To

1.

in

furnish dentists with a

more complete preparation

for a career in dental educa-

tion.

To

2.

offer training in investigation so that research

on important unsolved problems

indigenous to dental science will be extended.

APPLICATION To

apply for a dental fellowship in the basic medical sciences the applicant should

obtain

—from

168th Street,

the Postgraduate Division, School of Dental

New York

32,

N.Y.

and Oral Surgery, 630 West should be filled out and

—an application form which

returned to the same address. As part of his application, the applicant should arrange for each college or university he has attended to send two the

same

may

address.

A

official transcripts

personal interview with the applicant

be submitted at any time. Appointments are

made

is

of his record to

also required. Applications

as vacancies occur.

ADMISSION AS A GRADUATE STUDENT, FACULTY OF PURE SCIENCE Upon acceptance by the School of Dental and Oral Surgery and the basic medical science department concerned, the applicant must apply for admission and registration as a regular graduate student under the Faculty of Pure Science, where, in accordance with the rules

and regulations of

that faculty, he

may become a candidate for the degree of Doctor is to be made on a form supplied on request

of Philosophy. Application for admission

by the

York

Office of University Admissions, 322 University Hall,

27,

Columbia University,

New

N.Y.

REGISTRATION Before attending University courses, every student must obtain from the Office of University

Admissions an admission permit, present

registration

form giving such information

as

together with a statement of the courses he fees.

The

is

this at the Office of

may

the Registrar,

file

a

be required for the University records,

authorized to pursue, and pay the required

Office of the Registrar, 315 University Hall,

is

open on registration days from

9 a.m. to 4 p.m. and 6 p.m. to 8 p.m., except on Saturday, when it is open from 9 a.m. to 12 m. The periods set aside for registration in each session are stated in the University

Calendar of the announcement of the Faculty of Pure Science. Under the statutes

of the University,

payment

student's registration

is

of fees

is

constituted a part of registration; accordingly,

complete until his fees have been paid.

No

student

is

no

permitted

any University course for which he is not officially registered. To receive credit toward a degree under the Faculty of Pure Science a student must register under that to attend

TRAINING IN THE BASIC MEDICAL SCIENCES faculty.



19

Except as specified in the section "Courses in Professional Schools," graduate

announcements of other schools of the University will not be is enrolled for such courses on a Graduate

courses listed in the

credited toward a degree unless the student Faculties permit

and

registration form.

PROGRAM OF STUDIES During the

gram with

registration period the student will

required before registration

is

Names

completed.

have an opportunity to discuss his pro-

whose signed approval of

a departmental representative,

the

program

is

of the departmental representatives are

given under the several departmental sections of the announcement of the Faculty of

Pure Science, a copy of which

may

Admissions, Columbia University, the Secretary, 213

Low Memorial

be obtained by mail from the Office of University 27, N.Y., or in person from the Office of

New York

Library.

INSTRUCTION The formal

instruction will be elected

from courses offered under the graduate program and Oral Surgery, the College of

of the Faculty of Pure Science, the School of Dental

Physicians

and Surgeons, and the School of Public Health.

RESEARCH Each fellow

will be expected to formulate

and carry

out,

under supervision, an original

investigation in the laboratories of a basic science department.

CLINICAL EXPERIENCE Each fellow may attend maintain contact with

clinics of the

clinical dentistry

AND TEACHING

School of Dental and Oral Surgery in order to

and

will be given

an opportunity

to participate in

undergraduate teaching.

ATTENDANCE During the period of appointment, fellows

will be expected to

remain in residence and

devote their entire time to study and investigation at Columbia University.

BOOKS TO BE USED BY POSTGRADUATE STUDENTS

THE VARIOUS COURSES

IN Adriani, John. Techniques

Thomas,

and Procedures

of Anesthesia. Springfield,

111.:

Charles C.

1952.

Beder, Oscar E. Surgical

and

New

Maxillofacial Prosthesis.

York: Columbia University

Press, 1949.

Berger, Adolph.

The

and Technique of Oral Surgery. New York: Dental Items Company, 1946. Principles and Techniques of the Removal of York: Dental Items of Interest Publishing Company, 1923.

Principles

of Interest Publishing

Teeth. 1st ed.

New

Beube, Frank E. Periodontology.

New

York: The Macmillan Company, 1953.

Brauer Higley, Massler and Schour. Dentistry for Children. 3d ed. Philadelphia: Blakiston Company, 1953. Burket, Lester Cecil

W.

Oral Medicine. 2d ed. Philadelphia:

and Loeb. Textboo\

W.

of Medicine. 8th ed.

Diamond, M., and Weinmann,

J.

The Enamel

B.

J.

1952.

Saunders Company, 1951.

Human

of the

Company,

B. Lippincott

Teeth.

New

York: Colum-

bia University Press, 1940.

Goldman, Henry. Periodontia.

St.

Mosby Company,

Louis: C. V.

Orban, and Diamond. Biology of the Tooth and York: The Macmillan Company, 1938.

Gottlieb,

New

Its

1953.

Supporting Mechanism.

Gray, Horace, and Ayres. Growth in Private School Children. Chicago: University of

Chicago Press, 1931.

Homans, John. Textboo\ Howells, William.

of Surgery. 6th ed. Springfield,

Mankind So

Far.

New

111.:

Charles C. Thomas, 1945.

York: Doubleday Company, 1950.

Kolmer, John A. Clinical Diagnosis by Laboratory Examinations.

New

York: D. Apple-

ton-Century-Crofts Company, 1949. Leicester,

Henry. Biochemistry of the Teeth.

Nevin and Puterbaugh. Conduction,

St.

Louis: C. V.

Infiltration,

Mosby Company,

and General Anesthesia.

1949.

New

York:

Dental Items of Interest Publishing Company, 1948. Oliver, Irish,

and Wood. Labio-Lingual Technic.

Orban, Balint. Oral Histology and Embryology.

St.

St.

Louis: C. V.

Mosby Company,

1940.

Louis: C. V.

Mosby Company,

1953.

Parker, Douglas B. Synopsis of Traumatic Injuries of the Face

Mosby Company,

and Jaws.

St.

Louis: C. V.

1942.

Salzmann, Jacob A. Principles of Orthodontics. Philadelphia:

J.

B. Lippincott

Company,

1950.

Shapiro,

Harry H. Maxillofacial Anatomy. Philadelphia:

J.

B. Lippincott

Company,

1954.

TEXTBOOKS Sherman, Henry C. Chemistry of Food and Nutrition. 8th

Company,

ed.

New York: The

21



Macmillan

1947.

Strang, Robert

H. W.

A

Textbook^ of Orthodontia. 3d ed. Philadelphia: Lea and Febiger,

1950.

Sutton,

Don

C. Physical Diagnosis.

Thoma, Kurt H. Oral Pathology.

Weinmann,

J.,

and H.

Weiss, E., and O.

S.

Sicher.

St.

St.

Louis: C. V.

Louis: C. V.

Bone and Bones.

Mosby Company,

Mosby Company,

St.

Louis: C. V.

English. Psychosomatic Medicine.

W.

B.

1937.

1950.

Mosby Company,

1947.

Saunders Company, 1949.

REQUIRED BOOKS

The

following books, listed by author, are required in certain Section

I

and Section

II

courses:

PD 403: Burket, Thoma PD 422 Strang :

RECOMMENDED BOOKS

The following

books, listed by author, are

recommended

for use in Section III courses:

Oral Diagnosis and Roentgenology: Burket, Cecil, Kolmer,

Thoma

Oral Surgery: Adriani, Beder, Berger, Cecil, Diamond, Gray, Homans, Leicester,

Nevin, Orban, Parker, Shapiro, Sherman, Sutton, Thoma, Weiss Orthodontics: Beder, Cecil,

Diamond, Gray, Howells,

Leicester,

Oliver,

Orban,

Salzmann, Shapiro, Sherman, Strang, Weiss Pedodontics: Brauer, Cecil, Diamond, Gray, Howells, Orban, Shapiro, Sherman,

Thoma Periodontology: Beube, Burket, Cecil, Diamond, Goldman, Gray, Leicester, Orban, Shapiro, Sherman,

Thoma, Weiss

OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION FRANZ ALTMANN,

Clinical Professor of Otolaryn-

BARNET M. LEVY,

Professor of Dentistry; A.B., Pennsylvania, 1938; D.D.S., 1942; M.S., Medical College of Virginia, 1944

gology; M.D., Vienna, 1925

EDMUND APPLEBAUM, tal

Anatomy; D.D.S.,

tistry,

Associate Professor of DenYork College of Den-

New

MELVIN

L. MORRIS, Assistant Clinical Professor of Dentistry; B.S., College of the City of New York,

1922

1934; A.M., Columbia, 1937; D.D.S., 1941

HERBERT AYERS,

Jr., Assistant Clinical Professor of Dentistry; A.B., Columbia, 1929; D.D.S., 1931

HERBERT BARTELSTONE,

Assistant

Professor

Pharmacology; B.S., College of the City of York, 1942; D.D.S., Columbia, 1945

FRANK

E.

BEUBE,

of

New

L.D.S., D.D.S., Toronto, 1930

BUNDRANT,

M.

Professor of Dentistry; D.D.S.,

LESTER CAHN,

New

D.D.S.,

NICHOLAS

Associate Clinical Professor of S. Dentistry; D.D.S., Columbia, 1936; B.S., New York University, 1935; A.M., 1938

ARMAND OPPENHEIMER,

Associate

Clinical

fessor

New

Howard, 1929

Associate Professor of Oral Pathology; York College of Dentistry, 1918

1929

SAUL SCHLUGER, Dentistry; D.D.S.,

Maryland, 1927

L.

Clinical

Dentistry; D.D.S., Columbia,

Dentistry;

A.B.,

Professor

of

1932

Assistant Clinical Professor

Michigan,

1939;

D.D.S.,

Co-

HICKEY,

Associate Dean (Dental and J. Oral Surgery); Professor of Oral Surgery; D.M.D.,

Harvard, 1932; M.D., Columbia, 1937

LEONARD

S.

HIRSCHFELD,

Associate Clinical Pro-

fessor of Dentistry; A.B., Columbia, 1941; D.D.S.,

1943 Assistant Clinical Professor of Dentistry; D.D.S., Pennsylvania, 1940

JACK M. BREUER, D.D.S., Clinical Assistant RUTH-ALICE DAVIS, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics

SOLON

A. ELLISON, D.D.S., Associate in Micro-

SIDNEY

L.

HOROWITZ,

D.D.S., Research Associ-

ate in Dentistry

ELLEN N. HOSIOSKY, D.M.D.,

D.D.S., Assistant

E. JOHNSON, D.D.S., Lecturer in Dentistry SHULAMITH KASTEIN, Dipl. (Vienna), Speech

JOSEPH

Pathologist

Den-

York, 1927;

Professor

of

Dentistry;

of Anat-

D.D.S.,

Minnesota, I9r6

ARTHUR TOTTEN,

Professor of Dentistry; D.D.S.,

Pennsylvania, 1926

WHITMAN,

CLIFFORD

Assistant Clinical ProfesL. sor of Dentistry; D.D.S., Maryland, 1927

V. ZEGARELLI, Associate Professor

A.B., Columbia, M.S., Chicago, 1942

Dentistry;

FRANCIS

J.

LOUGHLIN,

1934;

D.D.S.,

D.D.S.,

of

1937;

Instructor

in

Dentistry

IRWIN

D.

MANDEL,

D.D.S., Instructor in Dentistry

I.

NAHOUM,

D.D.S., Instructor in Dentistry

RALPH SCHLAEGER,

M.D.,

JULIUS TARSHIS, D.D.S.,

Clinical Professor of Dentistry

New

H. SHAPIRO, Assistant Professor omy; D.M.D., Tufts, 1918

HENRY

biology

Clinical Professor of

College of the City of

HARRY

EDWARD

JAMES JAY,

of

1931

Louisville,

D.D.S., Columbia, 1931

LEWIS STOWE,

lumbia, 1943

MAURICE

Professor

Clinical

Associate

LASZLO SCHWARTZ, tistry; B.S.,

ROBERT GOTTSEGEN, of

J. SAVOY, Clinical Professor of Dentistry; B.S., Manhattan, 1931; D.D.S., Columbia, 1935

Associate Professor of Dentistry; D.D.S.,

Associate

Dentistry;

Columbia, 1930

Associate Clinical Professor of

Dentistry; D.D.S., Columbia, 1921

HARRY GALTON,

of

1929; D.D.S.,

WILLIAM

1942; D.D.S., Columbia, 1945; Ph.D., 1952

LEWIS FOX,

Professor

New York,

B.S., College of the City of

Assistant Professor of Physiology; B.S., College of the City of New York,

MORRIS FIERSTEIN,

Assistant Clinical ProDentistry; A.B., College of the City of York, 1926; B.S., Columbia, 1927; D.D.S., of

SOLOMON ROSENSTEIN,

DI SALVO,

A.

of

NATHAN,

ALVIN

Associate Clinical Professor of

Dentistry; D.D.S., Columbia, 1943

THEODORE

1946; Ph.D., 1954

RUTH MOULTON,

Assistant Clinical Professor Psychiatry; B.S., Chicago, 1936; M.D., 1939

Clinical Professor of Dentistry;

JACK BUDOWSKY,

MELVIN MOSS, Assistant Professor of Anatomy; A.B., New York University, 1942; D.D.S., Columbia,

VIRGINIA WILKING, M.D.,

AARON

L.

Assistant

ACKERMAN,

Instructor in Radiology

Instructor in Dentistry Instructor in Psychiatry

D.D.S., M.P.H., Clinical

COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES

0050083430

CONDENSED ACADEMIC CALENDAR, Tuesday. Last day for

September

filing application or

1956-1957

renewal of application for

be awarded in October. The privilege of be granted on payment of a late fee.

all certificates to

may End of

plication

September

6

Thursday.

certificate of training course in oral

later ap-

surgery started

in September, 1954.

September

17

Monday,

to

September

19,

Wednesday. Registration

for all

new

stu-

dents in the certificate of training courses and students entering the second year of the certificate of training courses in oral sur-

gery and periodontology, including payment of fees for

September

20

November November December

22

6

3

Thursday. Classes begin for

all

all

students.

postgraduate students.

Tuesday. Election Day. Holiday.

Thursday. Thanksgiving Day. Holiday.

Monday. Last day for

for filing application or renewal of application

all certificates

application

may

to be

awarded

in February.

be granted on payment of a

The

privilege of later

late fee.

January

24 23

Monday, through January 6, 1957, Sunday. Christmas holidays. Wednesday. End of first term. End of certificate of training course

February

22

in orthodontics started in September, 1955. Friday. Washington's Birthday. Holiday.

December

March

1

Friday. Last day for filing application or renewal of application for all certificates

April

15

May

29

to be conferred in June.

The

privilege of later appli-

may

be granted on payment of a late fee. Monday, through April 21, Sunday. Easter holidays. cation

Wednesday. End of second term. End of certificate of training course in oral diagnosis and roentgenology and in pedodontics started in

End

September, 1956.

of certificate of training courses in periodon-

tology and Cerebral Palsy Dental Fellowship started in September, 1955-

May

30

Thursday. Memorial Day. Holiday.

June

4

July

4

September September

2

Monday. Labor Day. Holiday.

3

Tuesday. Last day for

Tuesday. Conferring of degrees. Monday. Independence Day. Holiday. filing application or

renewal of application for

be awarded in October. The privilege of be granted on payment of a late fee.

all certificates to

may End of

plication

Thursday.

September

certificate of training course in oral

later ap-

surgery started

in September, 1955.

September

16

Monday,

to

September

18,

Wednesday. Registration for

all

new

stu-

dents in the certificate of training courses and students entering the second year of the certificate of training courses in oral surgery

and periodontology, including payment September

19

November November December

28

5 2

of fees for all students.

Thursday. Classes begin for all postgraduate students. Tuesday. Election Day. Holiday. Thursday. Thanksgiving Day. Holiday. Monday. Last day for filing application or renewal of application for

be awarded in February. The privilege of be granted on payment of a late fee.

all certificates to

application

may

later

THE

MBIA-PRESBYTERIAN IEDICAL CENTER NEW YORK

BABIES HOSPITAL

PRESBYTERIAN HOSPITAL N. Y. ORTHOPAEDIC HOSPITAL SLOANE HOSPITAL SQUIER UROLOGICAL CLINIC

5. 6.

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CITY

7.

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8.

OPHTHALMOLOGY MAXWELL HALL

ADMINISTRATIVE MEDICINE 9.

10.

11. 12.

13. 14.

15.

INSTITUTE OF

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1917
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